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City of Portland, Oregon

Portland Bureau of Transportation

Portland 2035 Transportation System Plan

Portland 2035 Transportation System Plan

July 2018

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Introduction

Portland is projected to add 140,000 new jobs and 260,000 new residents over the next 20 years. As Portland and the region grow, however, there is a continuing challenge to maintain the natural environment, economic prosperity, and overall quality of life. If in 2035 the percentage of people who drive alone to work remains the same as it is now (nearly 60 percent), traffic, carbon emissions, and household spending on vehicles and fuel will all worsen significantly. In order to accommodate this growth, our transportation system must provide Portlanders safer and more convenient ways to walk, bike, and take transit for more trips. The 2035 Transportation System Plan guides investments to maintain and improve the livability of Portland by:

  • supporting the City’s commitment to Vision Zero by saving lives and reducing injuries to all people using our transportation system

  • limiting traffic congestion so transit and freight vehicles can move more reliably

  • reducing, carbon emissions and promoting healthy lifestyles

  • keeping more money in the local economy, as we spend less on vehicles and fuel

  • creating great places

The Transportation System Plan is the 20-year plan to guide transportation policies and investments in Portland. The TSP meets state and regional planning requirements and addresses local transportation needs. Transportation planning that promotes active transportation modes is essential to preserving the City’s livability and for the protection of the natural environment. Constructing significant amounts of new automobile capacity to accommodate growth is not a viable option because of the enormous costs and impacts. Adding more streets and parking lots divides neighborhoods, uses valuable land, encourages urban sprawl, and has negative environmental impacts. Alternative approaches, supporting a safer, more affordable and more complete multimodal transportation network must be used to ensure integrated, comprehensive solutions. The first TSP was adopted by Council in 2002 (Ordinance 177028).

The Transportation System Plan helps implement the City’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan in addition to the region’s 2040 Growth Concept by supporting a transportation system that makes it more convenient for people to walk, bicycle, use transit, and drive less to meet their daily needs. The TSP also recognizes that the transportation system must help grow and sustain the City’s economic health by accommodating the needs of businesses and supporting Portland’s role in the international economy.

The 2035 TSP includes:

  • Goals and policies that guide the maintenance, development and implementation of Portland’s transportation system

  • Objectives that further the implementation of the goals and policies

  • A list of projects and City wide programs along with a financial plan that would accommodate 20 years of population and employment growth

  • Master street plans and modal plans

  • Strategies and regulations for implementation, including street classifications

Elements of the TSP

The goals and policies, street classification descriptions and maps, the financial plan and the master street plan maps in the TSP were adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plan by City Council in 2016. The TSP was adopted concurrently with the Comprehensive Plan, but published under a separate cover. Stage 3 Update will be adopted separately from the Comp Plan and Stages 1 and 2, then incorporated into one TSP document.

The TSP is both an implementation tool and a supporting document to the Comprehensive Plan. It contains the transportation element of the City’s Public Facilities Plan, and the List of Significant Projects and Citywide Programs. The TSP also provides more detail than the Comprehensive Plan by including additional supporting information about transportation system conditions.

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Transportation System Plan Updates

In order to keep the TSP current and up-to-date with recent transportation planning and development activities, it is updated at regular intervals. The first two updates in the mid-2000s were not intended to include new policy initiatives. They were primarily technical in nature and included corrections, updates to project descriptions, updates on studies, and inclusion of new master street plans adopted as a part of planning efforts.

The first update was completed and adopted by City Council on October 13, 2004 (effective date, November 12, 2004; Ordinance Nos. 178815 and 178826).

The second update was completed and adopted by City Council on April 5, 2007 (effective date, May 5, 2007; Ordinance No 180871). While primarily technical in nature, this update also included new policy language to implement the City’s Green Street Policy.

Stage 1 TSP Update was a part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan update process and a component of the state’s Periodic Work Plan Task 4. It included Goals, Policies, Projects and Programs and a Financial Plan. It was adopted by City Council in June 2016.

The Stage 2 TSP Update was a part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan update and changes were made to implement the Comp Plan, as well as reflect adopted plans and classification changes since the last update in 2007. Periodic Work Plan Task 5 was adopted by City Council in December 2016.

TSP Stage 3 TSP Update is incorporating regional information, updating geographic policies and objectives, updating objectives, adding a few policies, changes to street classification for traffic, transit and emergency response, modal plans, and other changes as identified. There is also parallel staff process to reformat the document and create a new user friendly digital document.

Regulatory Framework

The TSP addresses and complies with a number of State and regional goals, policies, and regulations, as summarized below.

State of Oregon

Statewide Planning Goals

Oregon has 19 goals that provide a foundation for the State’s land use planning program. The TSP must comply with all applicable State goals. The two goals directly applicable to the TSP are Goal 11: Public Facilities Plan and Goal 12: Transportation.

Transportation Planning Rule

The Transportation Planning Rule (TPR) implements statewide planning Goal 12: Transportation. The TPR requires State, regional, and local jurisdictions to develop Transportation System Plans (TSPs) that comply with TPR provisions. These provisions include reducing vehicle miles traveled (VMT) per capita by 10 percent over the next 20 years, reducing parking spaces per capita, and improving opportunities for alternatives to the automobile.

Oregon Transportation Plan

The Oregon Transportation Plan (OTP) serves as the State’s TSP. Regional and local TSPs must be consistent with the OTP.

Regional Metro

Regional Transportation Plan

First adopted by Metro in 1983, with latest update in 2014, the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) serves as the regional TSP. As such, the RTP:

  • Is consistent with the requirements of the State TPR and OTP

  • Implements the 2040 Growth Concept and Regional Framework Plan

  • Focuses on the regional transportation system

  • Includes multimodal functional classifications and street design classifications

  • Includes a list of major system improvements

  • Includes a funding plan

As of August 2017 Metro and regional partners are updating the RTP with a new RTP to be issued in 2018.

Region 2040 Growth Concept

Metro adopted the 2040 Growth Concept as part of the Regional Urban Growth Goals and Objectives (RUGGOs) in 1995. The 2040 Growth Concept stated the preferred form of long-term regional growth and development, including the urban growth boundary (UGB), density, and open space protection. It also designates design types, such as central city, regional center, town center, and main street.

Regional Transportation Functional Plan

The Regional Transportation Functional Plan (first adopted in 2010, last updated in 2012; Ordinance No 10-1241B) implements the Goals and Objectives in section 2.3 of the RTP and the policies of the RTP, and replaces the regional parking policy of the Urban Growth Management Functional Plan (See RTFP Title 4: Regional Parking Management.) It provides policy basis and direction for local TSPs. The RTFP codifies requirements that local plans must comply with to be consistent with the Regional Transportation Plan. Therefore, its requirements are binding on cities and counties.

Urban Growth Management Functional Plan

Metro adopted the Urban Growth Management Functional Plan (UGMFP) in 1996 and updated it 2014 to implement regional goals and objectives adopted by the Metro Council as the Regional Growth Goals and Objectives (RUGGO), including the 2040 Growth Concept and the Regional Framework Plan. The UGMFP addresses the accommodation of regional population and job growth. Its requirements are binding on cities and counties.

Regional Framework Plan

The Regional Framework Plan, adopted in 1997, identifies regional policies to implement the 2040 Growth Concept, preserving access to nature and building great communities for today and the future. The plan was amended in 2005 and 2010, and again in 2014 as part of the adoption of the Climate Smart Strategy.

City of Portland

Comprehensive Plan

Portland’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan guides land use development and public facility investment decisions between now and 2035. This guidance is intended to help make Portland more prosperous, healthy, equitable and resilient.

The Comprehensive Plan includes five elements that work together to accomplish this goal:

  1. Vision and Guiding Principles

  2. Goals and Policies

  3. Comprehensive Plan Map

  4. List of Significant Projects

  5. Transportation policies, classifications and master street plans

Within the Comprehensive Plan and TSP, there are nine Transportation goals:

  1. Safety

  2. Multiple goals

  3. Great places

  4. Environmentally sustainable

  5. Equitable transportation

  6. Positive health outcomes

  7. Opportunities for prosperity

  8. Cost effectiveness

  9. Airport futures

Transportation related policies from the 2035 Comprehensive Plan (2015) are located in Chapter 9 (Transportation), Chapter 3 (Urban Design), Chapter 4 (Development) and Chapter 8 (Public Facilities). The TSP also includes additional sub-policies and geographic-specific policies and objectives.

Chapter 9: Transportation (policies are grouped in these subject areas:)

  • Designing and planning

  • Land use, development, and placemaking

  • Streets as public spaces

  • Modal Policies

  • Airport Futures

  • System Management

  • Transportation Demand Management

  • Parking Management

  • Finance, Programs and Coordination

Chapter 8: Public Facilities

  • Funding

  • Public Benefits

  • Public Rights of Way

  • Trails

  • Stormwater systems

Chapter 3: Urban Form

  • Citywide design and development

  • Centers

  • Corridors

  • Transit Station Areas

  • City Greenways

  • Employment areas

  • Pattern Areas

Chapter 4: Development

  • Design and Development of centers and corridors

  • Designing with nature

Portland Bureau of Transportation also using Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community Involvement for its public involvement policies.

Chapter 2 has seven goals and 41 policies.

Goals:

  • Community Involvement as a Partnership

  • Social Justice and Equity

  • Value Community Wisdom and Participation

  • Transparency and Accountability

  • Meaningful Participation

  • Accessible and Effective Participation

  • Strong Civic Infrastructure

Chapter 2 policies are grouped in these major areas:

  • Partners in decision making

  • Environmental justice

  • Invest in education and training

  • Community assessment

  • Transparency and accountability

  • Community involvement program

  • Process design and evaluation

  • Information design and development

Seven Outcomes

Working with our partners at Metro, the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, and the Oregon Department of Transportation, with direction from the Portland Plan (2012), the Climate Action Plan (2010), Health Equity & the Transportation System Plan Report (2012), and from the Comprehensive Plan Update, PBOT staff developed an outcome based approach to the TSP.

These seven outcomes directed policy choices as well as informed the development of criteria for selecting and prioritizing TSP Projects and Programs. The Transportation System Improvements Chapter contains details on the citywide project and programs process and evaluation.

These seven outcomes are:

  1. Reduce/eliminate transportation fatalities and injuries

  2. Improve access to daily needs, such as jobs, schools, grocery stores, and health care

  3. Improve health by increasing walking and bicycling

  4. Increase economic benefits, such as access to family wage jobs and freight access

  5. Ensure disadvantaged communities benefit as much or more than non-disadvantaged communities

  6. Reduce global warming pollution from transportation

  7. Prioritize the most cost-effective projects

Transportation Goals

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9)

Safety

The City achieves the standard of zero traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries. Transportation safety impacts the livability of a city and the comfort and security of those using City streets. Comprehensive efforts to improve transportation safety through equity, engineering, education, enforcement and evaluation will be used to eliminate traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries from Portland’s transportation system. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.A)

Multiple goals

Portland’s transportation system is funded and maintained to achieve multiple goals and measurable outcomes for people and the environment. The transportation system is safe, complete, interconnected, multimodal, and fulfills daily needs for people and businesses. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.B)

Great places

Portland’s transportation system enhances quality of life for all Portlanders, reinforces existing neighborhoods and great places, and helps make new great places in town centers, neighborhood centers and corridors, and civic corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.C)

Environmentally sustainable

The transportation system increasingly uses active transportation, renewable energy, or electricity from renewable sources, achieves adopted carbon reduction targets, and reduces air pollution, water pollution, noise, and Portlanders’ reliance on private vehicles. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.D)

Equitable transportation

The transportation system provides all Portlanders options to move about the city and meet their daily needs by using a variety of safe, efficient, convenient, and affordable modes of transportation. Transportation investments are responsive to the distinct needs of each community. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.E)

Positive health outcomes

The transportation system promotes positive health outcomes and minimizes negative impacts for all Portlanders by supporting active transportation, physical activity, and community and individual health. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.F)

Opportunities for prosperity

The transportation system supports a strong and diverse economy, enhances the competitiveness of the city and region, and maintains Portland’s role as a West Coast trade gateway and freight hub by providing efficient and reliable goods movement, multimodal access to employment areas and educational institutions, as well as enhanced freight access to industrial areas and intermodal freight facilities. The transportation system helps people and businesses reduce spending and keep money in the local economy by providing affordable alternatives to driving. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.G)

Cost effectiveness

The City analyzes and prioritizes capital and operating investments to cost effectively achieve the above goals while responsibly managing and protecting our past investments in existing assets. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.H)

Airport futures

Promote a sustainable airport (Portland International Airport [PDX]) by meeting the region’s air transportation needs without compromising livability and quality of life for future generations. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 9.I)

Transportation Policies

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 9)

Design and Planning Policies

Street design classifications: Maintain and implement street design classifications consistent with land use plans, environmental context, urban design pattern areas, and the Neighborhood Corridor and Civic Corridor Urban Design Framework designations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.1)

Street policy classifications: Maintain and implement street policy classifications for pedestrian, bicycle, transit, freight, emergency vehicle, and automotive movement, while considering access for all modes, connectivity, adjacent planned land uses, and state and regional requirements. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.2)

a: Designate district classifications that emphasize freight mobility and access in industrial and employment areas serving high levels of truck traffic and to accommodate the needs of intermodal freight movement. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.2.a)

b: Designate district classifications that give priority to pedestrian access in areas where high levels of pedestrian activity exist or are planned, including the Central City, Gateway regional center, town centers, neighborhood centers, and transit station areas. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.2.b)

c: Designate district classifications that give priority to bicycle access and mobility in areas where high levels of bicycle activity exist or are planned, including Downtown, the River District, Lloyd District, Gateway Regional Center, town centers, neighborhood centers, and transit station areas. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.2.c)

Transportation System Plan: Maintain and implement the Transportation System Plan (TSP) as the decision-making tool for transportation-related projects, policies, programs, and street design. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.3)

Use of classifications: Plan, develop, implement, and manage the transportation system in accordance with street design and policy classifications outlined in the Transportation System Plan. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.4)

a: Classification descriptions are used to describe how streets should function for each mode of travel, not necessarily how they are functioning at present. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.4.a)

Mode share goals and vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reduction: Increase the share of trips made using active and low-carbon transportation modes. Reduce VMT to achieve targets set in the most current Climate Action Plan and Transportation System Plan, and meet or exceed Metro’s mode share and VMT targets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.5)

Transportation strategy for people movement: Implement a prioritization of modes for people movement by making transportation system decisions according to the following ordered list:

  1. Walking

  2. Bicycling

  3. Transit

  4. Fleets of electric, fully automated, multiple passenger vehicles

  5. Other shared vehicles

  6. Low or no occupancy vehicles, fossil-fueled non-transit vehicles

(Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.6)

When implementing this prioritization, ensure that:

  • The needs and safety of each group of users are considered, and changes do not make existing conditions worse for the most vulnerable users higher on the ordered list.

  • All users’ needs are balanced with the intent of optimizing the right of way for multiple modes on the same street.

  • When necessary to ensure safety, accommodate some users on parallel streets as part of a multi-street corridor.

  • Land use and system plans, network functionality for all modes, other street functions, and complete street policies, are maintained.

  • Policy-based rationale is provided if modes lower in the ordered list are prioritized.

Moving goods and delivering services: In tandem with people movement, maintain efficient and reliable movement of goods and services as a critical transportation system function. Prioritize freight system reliability improvements over single-occupancy vehicle mobility where there are solutions that distinctly address those different needs. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.7)

Affordability: Improve and maintain the transportation system to increase access to convenient and affordable transportation options for all Portlanders, especially those who have traditionally been under-served or under-represented or have historically borne unequal burdens. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.8)

Accessible and age-friendly transportation system: Ensure that transportation facilities are accessible to people of all ages and abilities, and that all improvements to the transportation system (traffic, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian) in the public right-of-way comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Improve and adapt the transportation system to better meet the needs of the most vulnerable users, including the young, older adults, and people with different abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.9)

Geographic policies: Adopt geographically-specific policies in the Transportation System Plan to ensure that transportation infrastructure reflects the unique topography, historic character, natural features, system gaps, economic needs, demographics, and land uses of each area. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.10)

a: Refer to adopted area plans for additional applicable geographic objectives related to transportation. (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.10.a)

Land Use, Development, and Placemaking Policies

Land use and transportation coordination: Implement the Comprehensive Plan Map and the Urban Design Framework through coordinated long-range transportation and land use planning. Ensure that street policy and design classifications and land uses complement one another. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.11)

Growth strategy: Use street design and policy classifications to support goals 3A-3G in Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Urban Form. Consider the different design contexts and transportation functions in Town Centers, Neighborhood Centers, Neighborhood Corridors, Employment Areas, Freight Corridors, Civic Corridors, Transit Station Areas, and Greenways. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.12)

Development and street design: Evaluate adjacent land uses to help inform street classifications in framing, shaping, and activating the public space of streets. Guide development and land use to create the kinds of places and street environments intended for different types of streets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.13)

Streets as Public Spaces Policies

Streets for transportation and public spaces: Integrate both placemaking and transportation functions when designing and managing streets by encouraging design, development, and operation of streets to enhance opportunities for them to serve as places for community interaction, environmental function, open space, tree canopy, recreation, and other community purposes. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.14)

Repurposing street space: Encourage repurposing street segments that are not critical for transportation connectivity to other community purposes. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.15)

Design with nature: Promote street and trail alignments and designs that respond to topography and natural features, when feasible, and protect streams, wildlife habitat, and native trees. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.16)

Pedestrian transportation: Encourage walking as the most attractive mode of transportation for most short trips, within neighborhoods and to centers, corridors, and major destinations, and as a means for accessing transit. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.17)

Pedestrian networks: Create more complete networks of pedestrian facilities, and improve the quality of the pedestrian environment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.18)

Pedestrian safety and accessibility: Improve pedestrian safety, accessibility, and convenience for people of all ages and abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.19)

Bicycle transportation: Create conditions that make bicycling more attractive than driving for most trips of approximately three miles or less. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.20)

Accessible bicycle system: Create a bicycle transportation system that is safe, comfortable, and accessible to people of all ages and abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.21)

Public transportation: Coordinate with public transit agencies to create conditions that make transit the preferred mode of travel for trips that are not made by walking or bicycling. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.22)

Transportation to job centers: Promote and enhance transit to be more convenient and economical than the automobile for people traveling more than three miles to and from the Central City and Gateway. Enhance regional access to the Central City and access from Portland to other regional job centers. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.23)

Transit service: In partnership with TriMet, develop a public transportation system that conveniently, safely, comfortably, and equitably serves residents and workers 24 hours a day, seven days a week. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.24)

Transit equity: In partnership with TriMet, maintain and expand high-quality frequent transit service to all Town Centers, Civic Corridors, Neighborhood Centers, Neighborhood Corridors, and other major concentrations of employment, and improve service to areas with high concentrations of poverty and historically under-served and under-represented communities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.25)

a: Support a public transit system and regional transportation that address the transportation needs of historically marginalized communities and provide increased mobility options and access. (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.25.a)

Transit funding: Consider funding strategies and partnership opportunities that improve access to and equity in transit service, such as raising metro-wide funding to improve service and decrease user fees/fares. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.26)

Transit service to centers and corridors: Use transit investments as a means to shape the city’s growth and increase transit use. In partnership with TriMet and Metro, maintain, expand, and enhance Portland Streetcar, frequent service bus, and high-capacity transit, to better serve centers and corridors with the highest intensity of potential employment and household growth. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.27)

a: Locate major park-and-ride lots only where transit ridership is increased significantly, vehicle miles traveled are reduced, transit-supportive development is not hampered, bus service is not available or is inadequate, and the surrounding area is not negatively impacted. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.27.a)

Intercity passenger service: Coordinate planning and project development to expand intercity passenger transportation services in the Willamette Valley, and from Portland to California, Seattle, and Vancouver, BC. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.28)

Regional trafficways and transitways: Maintain capacity of regional transitways and existing regional trafficways to accommodate through-traffic. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.29)

Multimodal goods movement: Develop, maintain, and enhance a multimodal freight transportation system for the safe, reliable, sustainable, and efficient movement of goods within and through the city. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.30)

Economic development and industrial lands: Ensure that the transportation system supports traded sector economic development plans and full utilization of prime industrial land, including brownfield redevelopment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.31)

Multimodal system and hub: Maintain Portland’s role as a multimodal hub for global and regional movement of goods. Enhance Portland’s network of multimodal freight corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.32)

Freight network: Develop, manage, and maintain a safe, efficient, and reliable freight street network to provide freight access to and from intermodal freight facilities, industrial and commercial districts, and the regional transportation system. Invest to accommodate forecasted growth of interregional freight volumes and provide access to truck, marine, rail, and air transportation systems. Ensure designated routes and facilities are adequate for over-dimensional trucks and emergency equipment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.33)

Sustainable freight system: Support the efficient delivery of goods and services to businesses and neighborhoods, while also reducing environmental and neighborhood impacts. Encourage the use of energy efficient and clean delivery vehicles, and manage on- and off-street loading spaces to ensure adequate access for deliveries to businesses, while maintaining access to homes and businesses. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.34)

Freight rail network: Coordinate with stakeholders and regional partners to support continued reinvestment in, and modernization of, the freight rail network. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.35)

Portland Harbor: Coordinate with the Port of Portland, private stakeholders, and regional partners to improve and maintain access to marine terminals and related river-dependent uses in Portland Harbor. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.36)

a: Support continued reinvestment in, and modernization of, marine terminals in Portland Harbor. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.36.a)

b: Facilitate continued maintenance of the shipping channels in Portland Harbor and the Columbia River. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.36.b)

c: Support shifting more long-distance, high-volume movement of goods to river and oceangoing ships and rail. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.36.c)

Portland Heliport: Maintain Portland’s Heliport functionality in the Central City. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.37)

Automobile transportation: Maintain acceptable levels of mobility and access for private automobiles while reducing overall vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and negative impacts of private automobiles on the environment and human health. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.38)

Automobile efficiency: Coordinate land use and transportation plans and programs with other public and private stakeholders to encourage vehicle technology innovation, shifts toward electric and other cleaner, more energy-efficient vehicles and fuels, integration of smart vehicle technology with intelligent transportation systems, and greater use of options such as car-share, carpool, and taxi. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.39)

Emergency response: Maintain a network of accessible emergency response streets to facilitate safe and expedient emergency response and evacuation. Ensure that police, fire, ambulance, and other emergency providers can reach their destinations in a timely fashion, without negatively impacting traffic calming and other measures intended to reduce crashes and improve safety. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.40)

Airport Futures Policies

Portland International Airport: Maintain the Portland International Airport (PDX) as an important regional, national, and international transportation hub serving the bi-state economy. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.41)

Airport regulations: Implement the Airport Futures Plan through the implementation of the Portland International Airport Plan District. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.42)

a: Prohibit the development of a potential third parallel runway at PDX unless need for its construction is established through a transparent, thorough, and regional planning process. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.42.a)

b: Support implementation of the Aircraft Landing Zone to provide safer operating conditions for aircraft in the vicinity of PDX by limiting the height of structures, vegetation, and construction equipment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.42.b)

c: Support the Port of Portland’s Wildlife Hazard Management Plan by implementing airport-specific landscaping requirements in the Portland International Airport Plan District to reduce conflicts between wildlife and aircraft. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.42.c)

Airport partnerships: Partner with the Port of Portland and the regional community to address the critical interconnection between economic development, environmental stewardship, and social responsibility. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.43)

Support an ongoing public advisory committee for PDX to:

a: Support meaningful and collaborative public dialogue and engagement on airport related planning and development. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.43.a)

b: Provide an opportunity for the community to inform the decision-making related to the airport of the Port, the City of Portland, and other jurisdictions/organizations in the region. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.43.b)

c: Raise public knowledge about PDX and impacted communities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.43.c)

Airport investments: Ensure that new development and redevelopment of airport facilities supports the City’s and the Port’s sustainability goals and policies, and is in accordance with Figure 9-3 — Portland International Airport. Allow the Port flexibility in configuring airport facilities to preserve future development options, minimize environmental impacts, use land resources efficiently, maximize operational efficiency, ensure development can be effectively phased, and address Federal Aviation Administration’s airport design criteria. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.44)

System Management Policies

System management: Give preference to transportation improvements that use existing roadway capacity efficiently and that improve the safety of the system for all users. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.45)

a: Support regional equity measures for transportation system evaluation. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.45.a)

Traffic management: Evaluate and encourage traffic speed and volume to be consistent with street classifications and desired land uses to improve safety, preserve and enhance neighborhood livability, and meet system goals of calming vehicle traffic through a combination of enforcement, engineering, and education efforts. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.46)

a: Use traffic calming tools, traffic diversion and other available tools and methods to create and maintain sufficiently low automotive volumes and speeds on neighborhood greenways to ensure comfortable cycling environment on the street. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.46.a)

Connectivity: Establish an interconnected, multimodal transportation system to serve centers and other significant locations. Promote a logical, direct, and connected street system through street spacing guidelines and district-specific street plans found in the Transportation System Plan, and prioritize access to specific places by certain modes in accordance with Comprehensive Plan Policies 9.6 and 9.7. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47)

a: Develop conceptual master street plans for areas of the City that have significant amounts of vacant or underdeveloped land and where the street network does not meet City and Metro connectivity guidelines. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47.a)

b: As areas with adopted Street Plans develop, provide connectivity for all modes by developing the streets and accessways as shown on the Master Street Plan Maps in the Comp Plan. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47.b)

c: Continue to provide connectivity in areas with adopted Street Plans for all modes of travel by developing public and private streets as shown on the Master Street Plan Maps in the Comp Plan. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47.c)

d: Provide street connections with spacing of no more than 530 feet between connections except where prevented by barriers such as topography, railroads, freeways, or environmental constraints. Where streets must cross over protected water features, provide crossings at an average spacing of 800 to 1,000 feet, unless exceptional habitat quality of length of crossing prevents a full street connection. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47.d)

e: Provide bike and pedestrian connections at approximately 330 feet intervals on public easements or rights-of-way when full street connections are not possible, except where prevented by barriers s such as topography, railroads, freeways, or environmental constraints. Bike and pedestrian connections that cross protected water features should have an average spacing of no more than 530 feet, unless exceptional habitat quality or length of connection prevents a connection. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.47.e)

Technology: Encourage the use of emerging vehicle and parking technology to improve real-time management of the transportation network and to manage and allocate parking supply and demand. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.48)

Performance measures: Establish multimodal performance measures and measures of system completeness to evaluate and monitor the adequacy of transportation services based on performance measures in goals 9.A. through 9.I. Use these measures to evaluate overall system performance, inform corridor and area-specific plans and investments, identify project and program needs, evaluate and prioritize investments, and regulate development, institutional campus growth, zone changes, Comprehensive Plan Map amendments, and conditional uses. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.49)

a: Eliminate deaths and serious injuries for all who share Portland streets by 2025. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.a)

b: Maintain or decrease the number of peak period non-freight motor vehicle trips, system-wide and within each mobility corridor to reduce or manage congestion. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.b)

c: By 2035, reduce the number of miles Portlanders travel by car to 11 miles per day or less, on average. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.c)

d: Establish mode split targets in 2040 Growth Concept areas within the City, consistent with Metro’s targets for these areas. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.d)

e: By 2035, increase the mode share of daily non-drive alone trips to 70 percent citywide, and to the following in the five pattern areas:

Pattern Area 2035 Daily Target Mode Share
Central City > 85%
Inner Neighborhoods > 70%
Western Neighborhoods > 65%
Eastern Neighborhoods > 65%
Industrial and River > 55%

(Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.e)

f: By 2035, 70 percent of commuters walk, bike, take transit, carpool, or work from home at approximately the following rates:

Mode Mode Share
Walk 7.5%
Bicycle 25%
Transit 25%
Carpool 12.5%
Single Occupant Vehicle (SOV) 30% or less
Work at home 10% below the line (calculated outside of the modal targets above)

(Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.f)

g: By 2035, reduce Portland’s transportation-related carbon emissions to 50% below 1990 levels, at approximately 934,000 metric tons. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.g)

h: By 2025, increase the percentage of new mixed use zone building households not owning an automobile from approximately 13% (2014) to 25%, and reduce the percentage of households owning two automobiles from approximately 24% to 10%. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.h)

i: Develop and use alternatives to the level-of-service measure to improve safety, encourage multimodal transportation, and to evaluate and mitigate maintenance and new trip impacts from new development. (Transportation System Plan Plan Policy 9.49.i)

j: Use level-of-service, consistent with Table 9.1, as one measure to evaluate the adequacy of transportation facilities in the vicinity of sites subject to land use review. (Transportation System Plan Plan Policy 9.49.i)

k: Maintain acceptable levels of performance on state facilities and the regional arterial and throughway network, consistent with the interim standard in Table 9.2, in the development and adoption of, and amendments to, the Transportation System Plan and in legislative amendments to the Comprehensive Plan Map. (Transportation System Plan Plan Policy 9.49.k)

l: In areas identified by Metro that exceed the level-of-service in Table 9.2 and are planned to, but do not currently meet the alternative performance criteria, establish an action plan that does the following:

  • Anticipates growth and future impacts of motor vehicle traffic on multimodal travel in the area

  • Establishes strategies for mitigating the future impacts of motor vehicles

  • Establishes performance standards for monitoring and implementing the action plan. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.l)

m: Develop performance measures to track progress in creating and maintaining the transportation system. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.49.m)

Regional congestion management: Coordinate with Metro to establish new regional multimodal mobility standards that prioritize transit, freight, and system completeness. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.50)

a: Create a regional congestion management approach, including a market-based system, to price or charge for auto trips and parking, better account for the cost of auto trips, and to more efficiently manage the regional system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.50.a)

b: In the interim, use the deficiency thresholds and operating standards of the Regional Mobility Policy, in Figure 9‐4, for evaluation of impacts to state facilities and the regional arterial and throughway network. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.50.b)


Multimodal Mixed-Use Area: Designate a Central City Multimodal Mixed-Use Area (MMA) in the geography indicated in Figure 9‐2, which will render state congestion / mobility standards inapplicable to proposed plan amendments under OAR 660-0012-0060(10), subject to ODOT concurrence and execution of an agreement between ODOT and the City of Portland. The agreement should emphasize potential safety and operational impacts. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.51)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Policies

Outreach: Create and maintain TDM outreach programs that work with Transportation Management Associations (TMA), residents, employers, and employees that increase the modal share of walking, bicycling, and shared vehicle trips while reducing private vehicle ownership, parking demand, and drive-alone trips, especially during peak periods. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.52)

New development: Create and maintain TDM regulations and services that prevent and reduce traffic and parking impacts from new development and redevelopment. Encourage coordinated area-wide delivery of TDM programs. Monitor and improve the performance of private-sector TDM programs. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.53)

Projects and programs: Integrate TDM information into transportation project and program development and implementation to increase use of new multimodal transportation projects and services. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.54)

Parking Management Policies

Parking management: Reduce parking demand and manage supply to improve pedestrian, bicycle and transit mode share, neighborhood livability, safety, business district vitality, vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reduction, and air quality. Implement strategies that reduce demand for new parking and private vehicle ownership, and that help maintain optimal parking occupancy and availability. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.55)

Curb Zone: Recognize that the Curb Zone is a public space, a physical and spatial asset that has value and cost. Evaluate whether, when, and where parking is the highest and best use of this public space in support of broad City policy goals and local land use context. Establish thresholds to utilize parking management and pricing tools in areas with high parking demand to ensure adequate on-street parking supply during peak periods. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.56)

On-street parking: Manage parking and loading demand, supply, and operations in the public right of way to achieve mode share objectives, and to encourage safety, economic vitality, and livability. Use transportation demand management and pricing of parking in areas with high parking demand. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.57)

Off-street parking: Limit the development of new parking spaces to achieve land use, transportation, and environmental goals, especially in locations with frequent transit service. Regulate off-street parking to achieve mode share objectives, promote compact and walkable urban form, encourage lower rates of car ownership, and promote the vitality of commercial and employment areas. Use transportation demand management and pricing of parking in areas with high parking demand. Strive to provide adequate but not excessive off-street parking where needed, consistent with the preceding practices. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.58)

Share space and resources: Encourage the shared use of parking and vehicles to maximize the efficient use of limited urban space. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.59)

Cost and price: Recognize the high public and private cost of parking by encouraging prices that reflect the cost of providing parking and balance demand and supply. Discourage employee and resident parking subsidies. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.60)

Bicycle parking: Promote the development of new bicycle parking facilities including dedicated bike parking in the public right-of-way. Provide sufficient bicycle parking at high-capacity transit stations to enhance bicycle connection opportunities. Require provision of adequate off-street bicycle parking for new development and redevelopment. Encourage the provision of parking for different types of bicycles. In establishing the standards for long-term bicycle parking, consider the needs of persons with different levels of ability. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.61)

Finance, Programs, and Coordination Policies

Coordination

Coordinate with state and federal agencies, local and regional governments, special districts, other City bureaus, and providers of transportation services when planning for, developing, and funding transportation facilities and services. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.62)

New development impacts: Prevent, reduce, and mitigate the impacts of new development and redevelopment on the transportation system. Utilize strategies including transportation and parking demand management, transportation system analysis, and system and local impact mitigation improvements and fees. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.63)

Education and encouragement: Create, maintain, and coordinate educational and encouragement programs that support multimodal transportation and that emphasize safety for all modes of transportation. Ensure that these programs are accessible to historically underserved and under-represented populations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.64)

Telecommuting: Promote telecommuting and the use of communications technology to reduce travel demand. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.65)

Project and program selection criteria: Establish transportation project and program selection criteria consistent with [Transportation] goals 9A through 9I, to cost-effectively achieve access, placemaking, sustainability, equity, health, prosperity, and safety goals. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.66)

Funding: Encourage the development of a range of stable transportation funding sources that provide adequate resources to build and maintain an equitable and sustainable transportation system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 9.67)

Connected and Automated Vehicles Policies

Connected and automated vehicles priorities and outcomes: Prioritize connected and automated vehicles that are fleet/shared ownership, fully automated, electric and, for passenger vehicles, shared by multiple passengers (known by the acronym FAVES). Develop and implement strategies for each following topic. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.68)

a: Ensure that all levels of automated vehicles advance Vision Zero by operating safely for all users, especially for vulnerable road users. Require adequate insurance coverage for operators, customers, and the public at-large by providers of connected and autonomous vehicles. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.68.a)

b. Ensure that connected and automated vehicles improve travel time reliability and system efficiency by:

  1. maintaining or reducing the number of vehicle trips during peak congestion periods;

  2. reducing low occupancy vehicle trips during peak congestion periods;

  3. paying for use of, and impact on, Portland’s transportation system including factors such as congestion level, vehicle miles traveled, vehicle occupancy, and vehicle energy efficiency.

  4. Supporting and encouraging use of public transportation (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.68.b)

c. Cut vehicle carbon pollution by reducing low occupancy “empty miles” traveled by passenger vehicles with zero or one passengers. Prioritize electric and other zero direct emission vehicles operated by fleets and carrying multiple passengers. (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.68.c)

d. Make the benefits of automated mobility available on an equitable basis to all segments of the community while ensuring traditionally disadvantaged communities are not disproportionately hurt by connected and autonomous vehicle use. This includes people with disabilities, as well as communities of color, women, and geographically underserved communities. (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.68.d)

e. Identify, prevent, identify, and mitigate potential adverse impacts from connected and automated vehicles. (Transportation System Plan Policy Policy 9.68.e)

Connected and automated vehicles tools: Use a full range of tools to ensure that connected and automated vehicles and private data communications devices installed in the City right of way contribute to achieving Comprehensive Plan and Transportation System Plan goals and policies. (Transportation System PlanPolicy 9.69)

a: Maintain City authority to identify and develop appropriate data sharing requirements to inform and support safe, efficient, and effective management of the transportation system. Ensure that when connected and automated vehicles use City rights-of-way or when vehicles connect with smart infrastructure within the City they share information including, but not limited to, vehicle type, occupancy, speed, travel routes, and travel times, with appropriate privacy controls. Ensure that private data communications devices installed in the City right of way are required to share anonymized transportation data. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.69.a)

b: Design and manage the mobility zone, curb zone, and traffic control devices, e.g. to limit speeds to increase safety, to minimize cut-through traffic, evaluate future demand for pick-up and drop-off zones, and to prioritize automated electric vehicles carrying more passengers in congested times and locations. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.69.b)

c: Evaluate the public cost and benefit of investments in wayside communication systems serving connected and automated vehicles. Develop a criteria-driven automated vehicle wayside infrastructure investment plan. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.69.c)

d. Develop sustainable user-pays funding mechanisms to support connected and automated vehicle infrastructure and service investments, transportation system maintenance, and efficient system management. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.69.d)

e. Ensure that automated vehicles and vehicles that connect to smart City infrastructure, and private data communications devices installed in the City right of way, help pay for infrastructure and service investments, and support system reliability and efficiency. Develop a tiered pricing structure that reflects vehicle impacts on the transportation system, including factors such as congestion level, vehicle miles traveled, vehicle occupancy, and vehicle energy efficiency. (Transportation System Plan Policy 9.69.e)

Public Facilities and Services Goals

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8)

Public rights-of-way

Public rights-of-way enhance the public realm and provide a multi-purpose, connected, safe, and healthy physical space for movement and travel, public and private utilities, and other appropriate public functions and uses. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 8.D)

Public Facilities and Services Policies

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 8)

Funding Policies

Cost-effectiveness: Establish, improve, and maintain the public facilities necessary to serve designated land uses in ways that cost-effectively provide desired levels of service, consider facilities’ lifecycle costs, and maintain the City’s long-term financial sustainability. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.27)

Shared costs: Ensure the costs of constructing and providing public facilities and services are equitably shared by those who benefit from the provision of those facilities and services. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.28)

System development: Require private or public entities whose prospective development or redevelopment actions contribute to the need for public facility improvements, extensions, or construction to bear a proportional share of the costs. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.29)

Partnerships: Maintain or establish public and private partnerships for the development, management, or stewardship of public facilities necessary to serve designated land uses, as appropriate. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.30)

Public Benefit Policies

Application of Guiding Principles: Plan and invest in public facilities in ways that promote and balance the Guiding Principles established in The Vision and Guiding Principles of this Comprehensive Plan. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.31)

Community benefits: Encourage providing additional community benefits with large public facility projects as appropriate to address environmental justice policies in Comprehensive Plan Chapter 2: Community Involvement. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.32)

Community knowledge and experience: Encourage public engagement processes and strategies for large public facility projects to include community members in identifying potential impacts, mitigation measures, and community benefits. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.33)

Resource efficiency: Reduce the energy and resource use, waste, and carbon emissions from facilities necessary to serve designated land uses to meet adopted City goals and targets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.34)

Natural systems: Protect, enhance, and restore natural systems and features for their infrastructure service and other values. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.35)

Context-sensitive infrastructure: Design, improve, and maintain public rights-of-way and facilities in ways that are compatible with, and that minimize negative impacts on, their physical, environmental, and community context. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.36)

Site- and area-specific needs: Allow for site- and area-specific public facility standards, requirements, tools, and policies as needed to address distinct topographical, geologic, environmental, and other conditions. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.37)

Age-friendly public facilities: Promote public facility designs that make Portland more age-friendly. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.38)

Public Rights-of-Way Policies

Interconnected network: Establish a safe and connected rights-of-way system that equitably provides infrastructure services throughout the city. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.39)

Transportation function: Improve and maintain the right-of-way to support multimodal transportation mobility and access to goods and services as is consistent with the designated street classification. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.40)

Utility function: Improve and maintain the right-of-way to support equitable distribution of utilities, including water, sanitary sewer, stormwater management, energy, and communications, as appropriate. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.41)

Stormwater management function: Improve rights-of-way to integrate green infrastructure and other stormwater management facilities to meet desired levels-of-service and economic, social, and environmental objectives. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.42)

Trees in rights-of-way: Integrate trees into public rights-of-way to support City canopy goals, transportation functions, and economic, social, and environmental objectives. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.43)

Community uses: Allow community use of rights-of-way for purposes such as public gathering space, events, food production, or temporary festivals, as long as the community uses are integrated in ways that balance and minimize conflict with the designated through movement and access roles of rights-of-ways. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.44)

Pedestrian amenities: Encourage facilities that enhance pedestrian enjoyment, such as transit shelters, garbage containers, benches, etc. in the right of way. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.45)

Commercial uses: Accommodate allowable commercial uses of the rights-of-way for the purpose of enhancing commercial vitality, if the commercial uses can be integrated in ways that balance and minimize conflict with the other functions of the right-of-way. Restrict the size of signage in the right-of-way. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.46)

Flexible design: Allow flexibility in right-of-way design and development standards to appropriately reflect the pattern area and other relevant physical, community, and environmental contexts and local needs. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.47)

a: Use a variety of transportation resources in developing and designing projects for all City streets, such as the City of Portland’s Pedestrian Design Guide, Bicycle Master Plan-Appendix A, NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide, NACTO Urban Street Design Guide, Portland Parks and Recreation Trail Design Guidelines, Designing for Truck Movements and Other Large Vehicles, and City of Portland Green Street Policy, Stormwater Management Manual, Design Guide for Public Street Improvements, and Neighborhood Greenways. (Transportation System Plan Policy 8.47.a)

Corridors and City Greenways: Ensure public facilities located along Civic Corridors, Neighborhood Corridors, and City Greenways support the multiple objectives established for these corridors. Corridor and City Greenway goals and policies are listed in Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Urban Form. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.48)

Coordination. Coordinate the planning, design, development, improvement, and maintenance of public rights-of-way among appropriate public agencies, private providers, and adjacent landowners. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.49)

a. Coordination efforts should include the public facilities necessary to support the uses and functions of rights-of-way, as established in policies 8.40 to 8.46. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.49.a.)

b. Coordinate transportation and stormwater system plans and investments, especially in unimproved or substandard rights-of-way, to improve water quality, public safety, including for pedestrians and bicyclists, and neighborhood livability. (Transportation System Plan Policy 8.49.b.)

Undergrounding: Encourage undergrounding of electrical and telecommunications facilities within public rights-of-way, especially in centers and along Civic Corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.50)

Right-of-way vacations: Maintain rights-of-way if there is an established existing or future need for them, such as for transportation facilities or for other public functions established in policies 8.40 to 8.46. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.51)

Rail rights-of-way: Preserve existing and abandoned rail rights-of-way for future rail or public trail uses. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.52)

Trails Policies

Public trails: Establish, improve, and maintain a citywide system of local and regional public trails that provide transportation and/or recreation options and are a component of larger network of facilities for bicyclists, pedestrians, and recreational users. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.53)

Trail system connectivity: Plan, improve, and maintain the citywide trail system so that it connects and improves access to Portland’s neighborhoods, commercial areas, employment centers, schools, parks, natural areas, recreational facilities, regional destinations, the regional trail system, and other key places that Portlanders access in their daily lives. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.54)

Trail coordination: Coordinate planning, design, improvement, and maintenance of the trail system among City agencies, other public agencies, non-governmental partners, and adjacent landowners. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.55)

Trail diversity: Allow a variety of trail types to reflect a trail’s transportation and recreation roles, requirements, and physical context. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.56)

Public access requirements: Require public access and improvement of Major Public Trails as shown in Figure 8-2 — Major Public Trails. Major Public Trails include regional trails and other significant trail connections that provide for the movement of pedestrians, cyclists, and other users for recreation and transportation purposes. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.57)

Trail and City Greenway coordination: Coordinate the planning and improvement of trails as part of the City Greenways system. See Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Urban Form for additional policies related to City Greenways. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.58)

Trail and habitat corridor coordination: Coordinate the planning and improvement of trails with the establishment, enhancement, preservation, and access to habitat corridors. See Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3: Urban Form for additional policies related to Habitat Corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.59)

Intertwine coordination: Coordinate with the Intertwine Alliance and its partners, including local and regional parks providers, to integrate Portland’s trail and active transportation network with the bi-state regional trail system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.60)

Stormwater System Policies

Stormwater facilities: Provide adequate stormwater facilities for conveyance, flow control, and pollution reduction. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.68)

Green infrastructure: Promote the use of green infrastructure, such as natural areas, the urban forest, and landscaped stormwater facilities, to manage stormwater. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.71)

Stormwater discharge: Avoid or minimize the impact of stormwater discharges on the water and habitat quality of rivers and streams. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.72)

On-site stormwater management: Encourage on-site stormwater management, or management as close to the source as practical, through land use decisions and public facility investments. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 8.73)

Urban Form Goals

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3)

A city designed for people

Portland’s built environment is designed to serve the needs and aspirations of all Portlanders, promoting prosperity, health, equity, and resiliency. New development, redevelopment, and public investments reduce disparities and encourage social interaction to create a healthy connected city. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 3.A)

A climate and hazard resilient urban form

Portland’s compact urban form, sustainable building development practices, green infrastructure, and active transportation system reduce carbon emissions, reduce natural hazard risks and impacts, and improve resilience to the effects of climate change. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 3.B)

Focused growth

Household and employment growth is focused in the Central City and other centers, corridors, and transit station areas, creating compact urban development in areas with a high level of service and amenities, while allowing the relative stability of lower-density single-family residential areas. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 3.C)

A system of centers and corridors

Portland’s interconnected system of centers and corridors provides diverse housing options and employment opportunities, robust multimodal transportation connections, access to local services and amenities, and supports low-carbon complete, healthy, and equitable communities. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 3.D)

Connected public realm and open spaces

A network of parks, streets, City Greenways, and other public spaces supports community interaction; connects neighborhoods, districts, and destinations; and improves air, water, land quality, and environmental health. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 3.E)

Urban Form Policies

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 3)

Citywide Design and Development Policies

All ages and abilities: Strive for a built environment that provides a safe, healthful, and attractive environment for people of all ages and abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.4)

Centers Policies

Investments in centers: Encourage public and private investment in infrastructure, economic development, and community services in centers to ensure that all centers will support the populations they serve. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.15)

Accessibility: Design centers to be compact, safe, attractive, and accessible places, where the street environment makes access by transit, walking, biking, and mobility devices such as wheelchairs, safe and attractive for people of all ages and abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.18)

Center connections: Connect centers to each other and to other key local and regional destinations, such as schools, parks, and employment areas, by pedestrian trails and sidewalks, bicycle sharing, bicycle routes, frequent and convenient transit, and electric vehicle charging stations. Prepare and adopt future street plans for centers that currently have poor street connectivity, especially where large commercial parcels are planned to receive significant additional housing density. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.19)

Green infrastructure in centers: Integrate nature and green infrastructure into centers and enhance public views and connections to the surrounding natural features. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.20)

Central City Policies

Transportation hub: Enhance the Central City as the region’s multimodal transportation hub and optimize regional access as well as the movement of people and goods among key destinations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.25)

Regional transportation hub: Strengthen the Central City as the highly accessible and multimodal hub for moving people and goods, reinforcing its regional center roles, enabling successful high density employment and housing development, and thereby affirming its role in Metro’s Region 2040 Framework Plan. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.40)

Portals: Manage entry points into the Central City to provide balanced multimodal access to efficiently accommodate the increase in person trips and goods delivery as a result of growth and development. Discourage through trips from using Central City streets. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.41)

Optimized street network:. Improve street design and function to increase efficiency and safety for all transportation modes and the ability of the existing network to meet the access needs of businesses, shoppers, residents and visitors. Establish a system and standards that emphasize walking, bicycling, transit use and freight access while continuing to provide automobile access. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.42)

Transportation system management: Manage access and circulation to reduce traffic speeds and provide for safe street crossings, while balancing the need for vehicle and freight access to and from the district. Manage the roadway system within the Central City in a way that allows greater levels of traffic congestion. In congested areas, prioritize modes other than automobiles to accommodate travel demand. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.43)

Regional multimodal access: Work with the Oregon Department of Transportation on improvements to I-405, I-5 and US26 to enhance regional access to the Central City. Minimize through traffic on Central City streets, improve pedestrian and bicycle connectivity across the freeways and create opportunities for capping freeways to lessen the barrier effect of the freeway and open new areas for potential development and/or parks, open space, and recreation opportunities. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.44)

Mode split: Strive to achieve the Central City targets set in the most current Transportation System Plan. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.45)

Street diversity: Differentiate the character of key streets to offer a diversity of urban experiences and connections, reflect the character of unique districts and expand open space and recreation functions in the right-of-way where possible. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.46)

Streetscape: Improve the street environment and pedestrian experience by providing urban greenery, community uses of the right-of-way and by integrating high-density uses to activate the pedestrian environment and encourage community gathering. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.47)

Walking: Encourage walking as the principal way to get around the Central City, with improved on-street and off-street infrastructure that enhances safety and closes access gaps to areas within, and adjacent to, the Central City. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.48)

Bicycling: Prioritize bicycling by implementing world-class on-street and offstreet infrastructure that is safe, comfortable and convenient for people of all ages and abilities. Augment capital improvements with robust encouragement, education and enforcement efforts. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.49)

Transit: Continue to strengthen the regional role of transit in the Central City. Support increased frequency, span-of-service, reliability and safety, as well as expansion of the rail, bus and streetcar systems. Explore river transit opportunities. Facilitate safe, pleasant and efficient access and transfer opportunities for transit riders via a clear, intuitive and convenient transit network that consolidates fragmented routes and provides high standards of transit amenities. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.50)

Transportation demand management: Foster the development of business and property owner supported programs, incentives and activities that encourage employees, residents, students and visitors to use walking, cycling, transit, carpool and car-share, as well as telecommuting and traveling outside the hours of peak congestion. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.51)

Auto parking: Support Central City parking needs, particularly for retail, employment and residential growth, as well as for access to major attractions such as universities and event venues. Continue to limit the growth of the overall auto parking supply, and maximize the joint use of existing and new stalls to manage parking in a more efficient and dynamic manner, lower the costs of construction and meet mode split and climate action goals for the city. Maintain no auto parking minimum requirements in the Central City and set maximum auto parking ratios to encourage other modes and allow new long-term parking only if associated with new development or to serve buildings with little parking. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.52)

Bicycle Parking: Encourage the provision of bicycle parking to serve the expected increase in bicycle trips in the Central City. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.53)

Public Parking: Continue to manage public parking on the street system and in public garages to support Central City parking needs, prioritizing short trips and turnover to serve retail and visitor needs. Develop a performance-based parking program that manages Central City public parking to meet performance targets via dynamic pricing and other parking management tools and by providing clear and transparent parking information. Balance the need for on street parking with other uses of the curb zone. In managing the supply of on-street parking, the first priority is for short-term parking, followed by carpool and finally long-term parking. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.54)

Loading: Support the delivery of goods in the Central City. Pursue strategies that bring new ways of delivering goods to the Central City in a way that optimizes loading and freight access and makes efficient use of limited urban space. (Central City 2035 TSP Policy 9.55)

Gateway Regional Center Policies

Transportation: Enhance Gateway’s role as a regional high-capacity transit hub that serves as an anchor for East Portland’s multimodal transportation system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.29)

Town Centers Policies

Transportation: Improve Town Centers as multimodal transportation hubs that optimize access from the broad area of the city they serve and are linked to the region’s high-capacity transit system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.33)

Neighborhood Centers Policies

Transportation: Design Neighborhood Centers as multimodal transportation hubs that are served by frequent-service transit and optimize pedestrian and bicycle access from adjacent neighborhoods. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.37)

Inner Ring Districts Policies

Corridors: Guide growth in corridors to transition to mid-rise scale close to the Central City, especially along Civic Corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.40)

Active transportation: Enhance the role of the Inner Ring Districts’ extensive transit, bicycle, and pedestrian networks in conjunction with land uses that optimize the ability for more people to utilize this network. Improve the safety of pedestrian and bike connections to the Central City. Strengthen transit connections between the Inner Ring Districts and to the Central City. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.43)

Corridors Policies

Growth and mobility: Coordinate transportation and land use strategies along corridors to accommodate growth and mobility needs for people of all ages and abilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.44)

Connections: Improve corridors as multimodal connections providing transit, pedestrian, bicycle, and motor vehicle access and that serve the freight needs of centers and neighborhood business districts. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.45)

Design: Encourage street design that balances the important transportation functions of corridors with their roles as the setting for commercial activity and residential living. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.46)

Green infrastructure in corridors: Enhance corridors with distinctive green infrastructure, including landscaped stormwater facilities, extensive tree plantings, and other landscaping that both provide environmental function and contribute to a quality pedestrian environment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.47)

Civic Corridors Policies

Integrated land use and mobility: Enhance Civic Corridors as distinctive places that are models of ecological urban design, with transit-supportive densities of housing and employment, prominent street trees and other green features, and high-quality transit service and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.48)

Design great places: Improve public streets and sidewalks along Civic Corridors to support the vitality of business districts, create distinctive places, provide a safe, healthy, and attractive pedestrian environment, and contribute to quality living environments for residents. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.49)

Mobility corridors: Improve Civic Corridors as key mobility corridors of citywide importance that accommodate all modes of transportation within their right-of-way or on nearby parallel routes. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.50)

Freight: Maintain freight mobility and access on Civic Corridors that are also Major or Priority Truck Streets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.51)

Neighborhood Corridors Policies

Neighborhood Corridors: Enhance Neighborhood Corridors as important places that support vibrant neighborhood business districts with quality multi-family housing, while providing transportation connections that link neighborhoods. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.52)

Transit Station Area Policies

Transit-oriented development: Encourage transit-oriented development and transit-supportive concentrations of housing and jobs, and multimodal connections at and adjacent to high-capacity transit stations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.53)

Community connections: Integrate transit stations into surrounding communities and enhance pedestrian and bicycle facilities (including bike sharing) to provide safe and accessible connections to key destinations beyond the station area. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.54)

Transit station area safety: Design transit areas to improve pedestrian, bicycle, and personal safety. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.55)

City Greenways Policies

Connections: Create a network of distinctive and attractive City Greenways that link centers, parks, schools, rivers, natural areas, and other key community destinations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.60)

Integrated system: Create an integrated City Greenways system that includes regional trails through natural areas and along Portland’s rivers, connected to neighborhood greenways, and heritage parkways. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.61)

Multiple benefits: Design City Greenways that provide multiple benefits that contribute to Portland’s pedestrian, bicycle, green infrastructure, and parks and open space systems. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.62)

Design: Use design options such as distinctive street design, motor vehicle diversion, landscaping, tree plantings, scenic views, and other appropriate design options, to create City Greenways that extend the experience of open spaces and nature into neighborhoods, while improving stormwater management and calming traffic. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.63)

Employment Areas Policies

Regional Truck Corridors: Enhance designated streets to accommodate forecast freight growth and support intensified industrial use in nearby freight districts. See Figure 3-7 — Employment Areas. Designated regional truckways and priority truck streets (Transportation System Plan classifications are shown to illustrate this network). (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.68)

Pattern Areas

Portland has five distinct Pattern Areas. The development patterns and characteristics of these areas are influenced by the natural landscape and how and when these parts of the city were developed.

  1. Rivers

  2. Central City

  3. Inner Neighborhoods

  4. Western Neighborhoods

  5. Eastern Neighborhoods

Each Pattern Area has unique physical, social, cultural, and environmental qualities that differentiate them and create their sense of place. To maintain and enhance the positive qualities and sense of place in each pattern area, it is desirable to have policies and regulations that respond to each area’s unique natural and built assets.

The following policies identify key positive characteristics of each of Portland’s Pattern Areas that are relevant to decisions related to future development in these areas. Area and neighborhood plans should be consulted for more detailed guidance on design priorities in different parts of the city.

Rivers Pattern Area Policies

River transportation: Recognize and enhance the roles of the Willamette and Columbia rivers as part of Portland’s historic, current, and future transportation infrastructure, including for freight, commerce, commuting, and other public and private transportation functions. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.70)

Recreation: Improve conditions along and within the Willamette and Columbia rivers to accommodate a diverse mix of recreational users and activities. Designate and invest in strategically‐located sites along the length of Portland’s riverfronts for passive or active recreation activities that are compatible with nearby land uses, historically and culturally important sites, significant habitat areas, restoration sites, and native fish and wildlife usage. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.71)

Industry and port facilities: Enhance the regionally significant economic infrastructure that includes Oregon’s largest seaport and largest airport, unique multimodal freight, rail, and harbor access; the region’s critical energy hub; and proximity to anchor manufacturing and
distribution facilities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.72)

Commercial activities: Enhance the roles of the Willamette and Columbia rivers in supporting local and regional business and commerce, including commercial fishing, tourism, recreation, and leisure. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.74)

River access: Enhance and complete Portland’s system of river access points and riverside trails, including the Willamette Greenway Trail, and strengthen active transportation connections between neighborhoods and the rivers. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.76)

River management and coordination: Coordinate with federal, state, regional, special districts, and other agencies to address issues of mutual interest and concern, including economic development, recreation, water transportation, flood and floodplain management and protection, regulatory compliance, permitting, emergency management, endangered species recovery, climate change preparation, Portland Harbor Superfund, brownfield cleanup, and habitat restoration. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.77)

Columbia River: Enhance the role of the Columbia River for river dependent industry, fish and wildlife habitat, subsistence and commercial fisheries, floating‐ and land‐based neighborhoods, recreational uses, and water transportation. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.78)

Willamette River Central Reach: Enhance the role of the Willamette River Central Reach as the Central City and region’s primary riverfront destination for recreation, history and culture, emergency response, water transportation, and as habitat for fish and wildlife. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.80)

Willamette River Greenway: Maintain multi-objective plans and regulations to guide development, infrastructure investments, and natural resource protection and enhancement within and along the Willamette Greenway. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.82)

Central City Pattern Area Policies

Central City pedestrian system: Maintain and expand the Central City’s highly interconnected pedestrian system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.85)

Central City bicycle system: Expand and improve the Central City’s bicycle system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.86)

Inner Neighborhoods Pattern Area Policies

Inner Neighborhoods main streets: Maintain and enhance the Streetcar Era pattern of street-oriented buildings along Civic and Neighborhood corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.87)

Inner Neighborhoods street patterns: Preserve the area’s urban fabric of compact blocks and its highly interconnected grid of streets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.88)

Inner Neighborhoods active transportation: Use the extensive street, sidewalk, and bikeway system and multiple connections to the Central City as a key part of Portland’s active transportation system. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.90)

Inner Neighborhoods residential areas: Continue the patterns of small, connected blocks, regular lot patterns, and streets lined by planting strips and street trees in Inner Neighborhood residential areas. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.91)

a: Support development of, access to, and service enhancement for North-South transit. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.91.a)

b: Promote and guide the implementation of alley improvements that result in alleys that are safe, well maintained, and an asset for the community. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.91.b)

Eastern Neighborhoods Pattern Area Policies

Eastern Neighborhoods street, block, and lot pattern: Guide the evolving street and block system in the Eastern Neighborhoods in ways that build on positive aspects of the area’s large blocks, such as opportunities to continue mid-block open space patterns and create new connections through blocks that make it easier to access community destinations. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.92)

Eastern Neighborhoods site development: Require that land be aggregated into larger sites before land divisions and other redevelopment occurs. Require site plans which advance design and street connectivity goals. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.93)

Eastern Neighborhoods trees and natural features: Encourage development and right-of-way design that preserves and incorporates Douglas fir trees and groves, and that protects the area’s streams, forests, wetlands, steep slopes, and buttes. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.94)

Eastern Neighborhoods corridor landscaping: Encourage landscaped building setbacks along residential corridors on major streets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.96)

Eastern Neighborhoods active transportation: Enhance access to centers, employment areas, and other community destinations in Eastern Neighborhoods by ensuring that corridors have safe and accessible pedestrian and bicycle facilities and creating additional secondary connections that provide low-stress pedestrian and bicycle access. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.97)

a: Prioritize new sidewalk connections. Prioritize adding sidewalks where there are none over expanding/ widening existing connections. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.97.a)

b: Support development of, access to, and service enhancement for North-South transit. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.97.b)

Western Neighborhoods Pattern Area Policies

Western Neighborhoods active transportation: Provide safe and accessible pedestrian and bicycle connections, as well as off-street trail connections, to and from residential neighborhoods. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.99)

Western Neighborhoods trails: Develop pedestrian-oriented connections and enhance the Western Neighborhoods’ distinctive system of trails to increase safety, expand mobility, access to nature, and active living opportunities in the area. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 3.102)

a: Explore and emphasize Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and tools, that function in spite of unique topographic conditions of the West Hills, to provide effective options for commuters while reducing carbon emissions, improving neighborhood livability and cycling safety, and protecting important natural resources. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.102.a)

b: Protect the ecological quality and function of natural Forest Park’s natural resources in the design and development of transportation projects in or near the park and avoid, minimize, then mitigate adverse impacts to wildlife, habitat, and riparian corridors. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.102.b)

c: Primarily focus sidewalk and bicycle route improvements in (and in close proximity to) the designated Centers and Corridors of the Comp Plan. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.102.c)

d: Fill gaps in important access connections, including exploring traditional ROW acquisition and partnerships with other City bureaus. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.102.d)

e: Improve accessibility/create parallel routes in some cases (for motor vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians, and/or both). Explore what existing facilities and connections most merit upgrades or secondary accessible routes. (Transportation System Plan Policy 3.102.e)

Design and Development Goals

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 4)

Context-sensitive Design and Development

New development is designed to respond to and enhance the distinctive physical, historic, and cultural qualities of its location, while accommodating growth and change. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 4.A)

Human and Environmental Health

Neighborhoods and development are efficiently designed and built to enhance human and environmental health: they protect safety and livability; support local access to healthy food; limit negative impacts on water, hydrology, and air quality; reduce carbon emissions; encourage active and sustainable design; protect wildlife; address urban heat islands; and integrate nature and the built environment. (Comprehensive Plan Goal 4.C)

Design and Development Policies

(Comprehensive Plan Chapter 4)

Context Policies

Pattern areas: Encourage building and site designs that respect the unique built natural, historic, and cultural characteristics of Portland’s five pattern areas described in Chapter 3: Urban Form. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.1)

Community identity: Encourage the development of character-giving design features that are responsive to place and the cultures of communities. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.2)

Site and context: Encourage development that responds to and enhances the positive qualities of site and context — the neighborhood, the block, the public realm, and natural features. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.3)

Natural features and green infrastructure: Integrate natural and green infrastructure such as trees, green spaces, ecoroofs, gardens, green walls, and vegetated stormwater management systems, into the urban environment. Encourage stormwater facilities that are designed to be a functional and attractive element of public spaces, especially in centers and corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.4)

Pedestrian-oriented design: Enhance the pedestrian experience throughout Portland through public and private development that creates accessible, safe, and attractive places for all those who walk and/or use wheelchairs or other mobility devices. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.5)

Street orientation: Promote building and site designs that enhance the pedestrian experience with windows, entrances, pathways, and other features that provide connections to the street environment. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.6)

Development and public spaces: Guide development to help create high-quality public places and street environments while considering the role of adjacent development in framing, shaping, and activating the public space of streets and urban parks. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.7)

Alleys: Encourage the continued use of alleys for parking access, while preserving pedestrian access. Expand the number of alley-facing accessory dwelling units. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.8)

Transitional urbanism: Encourage temporary activities and structures in places that are transitioning to urban areas to promote job creation, entrepreneurship, active streets, and human interaction. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.9)

Design and Development of Centers and Corridors Policies

Walkable scale: Focus services and higher-density housing in the core of centers to support a critical mass of demand for commercial services and more walkable access for customers. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.20)

Street environment: Encourage development in centers and corridors to include amenities that create a pedestrian-oriented environment and provide places for people to sit, spend time, and gather. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.21)

Relationship between building height and street size: Encourage development in centers and corridors that is responsive to street space width, thus allowing taller buildings on wider streets. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.22)

Design for pedestrian and bicycle access: Provide accessible sidewalks, high-quality bicycle access, and frequent street connections and crossings in centers and corridors. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.23)

Designing with Nature Policies

Design with nature: Encourage design and site development practices that enhance, and avoid the degradation of, watershed health and ecosystem services and that incorporate trees and vegetation. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.73)

Flexible development options: Encourage flexibility in the division of land, the siting and design of buildings, and other improvements to reduce the impact of development on environmentally-sensitive areas and to retain healthy native and beneficial vegetation and trees. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.74)

Low-impact development and best practices: Encourage use of low-impact development, habitat-friendly development, bird-friendly design, and green infrastructure. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.75)

Impervious surfaces: Limit use of and strive to reduce impervious surfaces and associated impacts on hydrologic function, air and water quality, habitat connectivity, tree canopy, and urban heat island effects. (Comprehensive Plan Policy 4.76)

Street Classification Descriptions

Pedestrian Classification Descriptions (adopted 2002, currently under review. See the update of the Pedestrian Master Plan at https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/72504)

Pedestrian Classification Descriptions maintain a system of pedestrianways to serve all types of pedestrian trips, particularly those with a transportation function.

Pedestrian Districts

Pedestrian Districts are intended to give priority to pedestrian access in areas where high levels of pedestrian activity exist or are planned, including the Central City, Gateway regional center, town centers, and station communities.

Land Use: Zoning should allow a transit-supportive density of residential and commercial uses that support lively and intensive pedestrian activity. Auto-oriented development should be discouraged in Pedestrian Districts. Institutional campuses that generate high levels of pedestrian activity may be included in Pedestrian Districts. Exceptions to the density and zoning criteria may be appropriate in some designated historic districts with a strong pedestrian orientation.

Streets within a District: Make walking the mode of choice for all trips within a Pedestrian District. All streets within a Pedestrian District are equal in importance in serving pedestrian trips and should have sidewalks on both sides.

Characteristics: The size and configuration of a Pedestrian District should be consistent with the scale of walking trips. A Pedestrian District includes both sides of the streets along its boundaries, except where the abutting street is classified as a Regional Trafficway. In these instances, the land up to the Regional Trafficway is considered part of the Pedestrian District, but the Regional Trafficway itself is not.

Access to Transit: A Pedestrian District should have, or be planned to have, frequent transit service and convenient access to transit stops.

Improvements: Use the Pedestrian Design Guide to design streets within Pedestrian Districts. Improvements may include widened sidewalks, curb extensions, street lighting, street trees, and signing. Where two arterials cross, design treatments such as curb extensions, median pedestrian refuges, marked crosswalks, and traffic signals should be considered to minimize the crossing distance, direct pedestrians across the safest route, and provide safe gaps in the traffic stream.

Pedestrian-Transit Streets

Pedestrian-Transit Streets are intended to create a strong and visible relationship between pedestrians and transit within the Central City.

Land Use: Pedestrian-Transit Streets respond to significant public investments in public transportation, including light rail, the transit mall, and streetcar, and enhance the pedestrian environment adjacent to high-density land uses.

Improvements: Improvements should include wide sidewalks to accommodate high levels of pedestrian traffic, urban design features that promote pedestrian activity, and visual signals to motor vehicles to recognize the priority of pedestrian and transit vehicles.

City Walkways

City Walkways are intended to provide safe, convenient, and attractive pedestrian access to activities along major streets and to recreation and institutions; provide connections between neighborhoods; and provide access to transit.

Land Use: City Walkways should serve areas with dense zoning, commercial areas, and major destinations. Where auto-oriented land uses are allowed on City Walkways, site development standards should address the needs of pedestrians for access.

Improvements: Use the Pedestrian Design Guide to design City Walkways. Consider special design treatment for City Walkways that are also designated as Regional or Community Main Streets.

Off-Street Paths

Off-Street Paths are intended to serve recreational and other walking trips.

Function: Use Off-Street Paths as shortcuts to link urban destinations and origins along continuous greenbelts such as rivers, park and forest areas, and other scenic corridors, and used as elements of a regional, citywide, or community recreational trail plan.

Location: Establish Off-Street Paths in corridors not well served by the street system. On existing rights-of-way that are not developed or likely to be developed in the near future, Off-Street Paths may be designated where needed to complete the pedestrian system.

Improvements: Use the Pedestrian Design Guide to design Off-Street Paths. Design Off-Street Paths as separated facilities that accommodate pedestrians and may accommodate other non-motorized vehicles.

Local Service Walkways

Local Service Walkways are intended to serve local circulation needs for pedestrians and provide safe and convenient access to local destinations, including safe routes to schools.

Land Use: Local Service Walkways are usually located in residential, commercial, or industrial areas on Local Service Traffic Streets.

Classification: All streets not classified as City Walkways or Off-Street Paths, with the exception of Regional Trafficways not also classified as Major City Traffic Streets, are classified as Local Service Walkways.

Improvements: Use the Pedestrian Design Guide to design Local Service Walkways.

Bicycle Classification Descriptions

Major City Bikeways

Major City Bikeways form the backbone of the city’s bikeway network and are intended to serve high volumes of bicycle traffic and provide direct, seamless, efficient travel across and between transportation districts.

Land Use: Major City Bikeways should support 2040 land use types.

Improvements: Major City Bikeways should be designed to accommodate large volumes of bicyclists, to maximize their comfort and to minimize delays by emphasizing the movement of bicycles. Build the highest quality bikeway facilities. Motor vehicle lanes and on-street parking may be removed on Major City Bikeways to provide needed width for separated-in-roadway facilities where compatible with adjacent land uses and only after performing careful analysis to determine potential impacts to the essential movement of all modes. Where improvements to the bicycling environment are needed but the ability to reallocate road space is limited, consider alternative approaches that include property acquisition, or dedication, parallel routes and/or less desirable facilities. On Major City Bikeways developed as shared roadways, use all appropriate tools to achieve recommended performance guidelines. Where conditions warrant and where practical, Major City Bikeways should have separated facilities for bicycles and pedestrians.

City Bikeways

City Bikeways are intended to establish direct and convenient bicycle access to significant destinations, to provide convenient access to Major City Bikeways and to provide coverage within three city blocks of any given point.

Land Use: City Bikeways should support 2040 land use types and residential neighborhoods.

Improvements: City Bikeways emphasize the movement of bicycles. Build the highest quality bikeway facilities. Motor vehicle lanes and on-street parking may be removed on City Bikeways to provide needed width for separated-in-roadway facilities where compatible with adjacent land uses and only after taking into consideration the essential movement of all modes. Where improvements to the bicycling environment are needed but the ability to reallocate road space is limited, consider alternative approaches that include property acquisition, or dedication, parallel routes and/or less desirable facilities. On City Bikeways developed as shared roadways, use all appropriate tools to achieve recommended performance guidelines.

Local Service Bikeways

Local Service Bikeways are intended to serve local circulation needs for bicyclists and provide access to adjacent properties.

Classification: All streets not classified as City Bikeways or Major City Bikeways with the exception of Regional Trafficways not also classified as Major City Traffic Streets, are classified as Local Service Bikeways.

Improvements: Consider the following design treatments for Local Service Bikeways: shared roadways, traffic calming, bicycle lanes, and extra-wide curb lanes. Crossings of Local Service Bikeways with other rights-of-way should minimize conflicts.

On-Street Parking: On-street parking on Local Service Bikeways should not be removed to provide bicycle lanes.

Operation: Treatment of Local Service Bikeways should not have a side effect of creating, accommodating, or encouraging automobile through-traffic.

Bicycle Districts

Bicycle Districts are areas with a dense concentration of commercial, cultural, institutional and/or recreational destinations where the City intends to make bicycle travel more attractive than driving.

Land Use: High density and mixed-use neighborhoods should be targeted as bicycle districts. Auto-oriented development should be discouraged in Bicycle Districts.

Characteristics: The size and configuration of a Bicycle District should be consistent with the scale of bicycling trips. A Bicycle District includes the streets along its boundaries, except where the abutting street is classified as a Regional Trafficway.

Improvements: All streets within a Bicycle District are important in serving bicycle trips. Appropriate bicycle facilities should be determined for each street based on the desired bicycling conditions and operations. Use the bikeway design and engineering guidelines to design streets within Bicycle Districts.

Transit Classification Descriptions

Maintain a system of transit streets that supports the movement of transit vehicles for regional, interdistrict, and local trips.

Regional Transitways

Regional Transitways are intended to facilitate regional and interdistrict transit trips with fast and reliable service over long distances, operating in right-of-way exclusively reserved for transit use to the extent possible.

Land Use: Development with a regional attraction (e.g., shopping centers, arenas) are encouraged to locate adjacent to Regional Transitway stations to reduce traffic impacts on adjoining areas and streets. Locate high-density development within a half-mile of transit stations on Regional Transitways, with the highest densities closest to the stations.

Access to Transit: Transit stations should be designed to accommodate a high level of safe multimodal access within a half-mile radius of the station. Provide convenient connection opportunities at Regional Transitway stations when feasible, including feeder bus service, bike-share stations, secure bicycle parking, pick-up and drop-off zones, and shuttle services. Use park-and-ride facilities to access Regional Transit stations only at ends of Regional Transitways or where adequate feeder bus service is not feasible.

Improvements: Use transit-preferential treatments to facilitate fast and reliable transit operations. Provide signal preemption or transit signal priority at major intersections, prioritize transit stations or transit lanes over on-street parking, and provide enough lane width to accommodate standard transit vehicles. Provide exclusive or semi-exclusive transitways wherever possible, including treatments on freeways and expressways such as transit lanes, HOV lanes, HOT lanes, and “bus on shoulder” operations. Employ access management measures to reduce conflicts between transit vehicles and other vehicles. Right-of-way acquisition or parking removal may occur to accommodate transit-preferential measures and improve access to transit. Carefully consider any street design changes to Regional Transitways that impact travel time in light of the potential costs and benefits to transit riders, while also taking into account other adopted goals and policies.

Transit Stations: Locate Regional Transitway stations at intervals of approximately one-half mile to two miles, while taking into account other factors including the need to serve major destinations, activity centers, transfer points, and people with disabilities. Express or limited service may have stations located further apart, as appropriate to serve origins and destinations. Transit stations should have a full range of passenger services, including accessible boarding platforms, covered waiting areas, route information, benches, secure bicycle parking, trash receptacles, enhanced signing, lighting, and telephones.

Bus stops: Buses providing local service along Regional Transitways should have more frequent stop spacing, similar to stop spacing along Major Transit Priority Streets.

Dual Classification: A street with a dual Regional Transitway and Major Transit Priority Street classifications should retain the operational characteristics of a Major Transit Priority Street and respond to adjacent land uses.

Connections: A ramp that connects to a Regional Transitway is classified as a Regional Transitway up to its intersection with a lower-classified street.

Major Transit Priority Streets

Major Transit Priority Streets facilitate the frequent and reliable movement of transit vehicles that connect Central City, regional centers, and town centers with each other and to other major destinations. Major Transit Priority Streets are provided frequent service, or are expected to receive that level of service in the future to support envisioned growth.

Land Use: Transit-oriented land uses should be encouraged to locate along Major Transit Priority Streets, especially in centers. Discourage auto-oriented develop­ment from locating on a Major Transit Priority Street, except where the street is outside the Central City, center, station community, or main street and is also classified as a Major City Traffic Street. Support land use densi­ties that vary directly with the existing and planned capacity of transit service.

Access to Transit: Provide safe and convenient access for pedestrians and bicyclists to, across, and along Major Transit Priority Streets. Provide safe and accessible pedestrian crossings at all transit stops along Major Transit Priority Streets.

Improvements: Provide transit signal priority at major intersections, prioritize transit stops or transit lanes over on-street parking, and provide enough lane width to accommodate standard transit vehicles. Consider the use of exclusive or semi-exclusive transit lanes where needed to reduce congestion-related transit delay. Design intersections of Major Transit Priority Streets with other Major Transit Priority Streets or Transit Access Streets to allow turning movements of a standard transit vehicle. Where compatible with adjacent land use designations, right-of-way acquisition or parking removal may occur to accommodate transit-preferential measures or improve access to transit. The use of access manage­ment should be considered where needed to reduce conflicts between transit vehicles and other vehicles.Carefully consider any street design changes to Major Transit Priority Streets that impact travel time in light of the potential costs and benefits to transit riders, while also taking into account other adopted goals and policies.

Traffic Slowing: Major Transit Priority Streets are not eligible for new traffic slowing devices such as speed bumps or speed cushions. Existing traffic slowing devices on Major Transit Priority Streets may remain and may be maintained and replaced as needed.

Transfer Points: Provide safe and convenient transfer points with accessible stops, covered waiting areas, transit route information, benches, trash receptacles, enhanced signing, lighting, and telephones.

Bus Stops: Locate bus stops to provide convenient access to neighborhoods and commercial centers. Stops should be located roughly every one-quarter to one-half mile, while taking into account other factors including the need to serve major destinations, activity centers, transfer points and people with disabilities. Stop spacing should also take into account existing sidewalk and street connectivity, with potentially closer stop spacing where sidewalk and street connectivity is more limited. On-street parking should be prohibited at bus stops in order to provide accessible waiting areas. Passenger amenities should include shelters and route information.

Transit Access Streets

Transit Access Streets facilitate movement of transit vehicles connecting town centers, neighborhood centers, and industrial and employment areas with other destinations and other transit service. Transit Access Streets are provided fixed-route service that is commensurate with the level of demand.

Land Use: Encourage pedestrian- and transit-oriented development in commercial, institutional, and mixed-use areas along Transit Access Streets.

Access to Transit: Provide safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle access to transfer points and stops and along Transit Access Streets. Provide safe and accessible pedestrian crossings at all transit stops along Transit Access Streets.

Transfer Points: Provide bus shelters, safe and convenient pedestrian crossings, and transit information at transfer points.

Improvements: Provide transit signal priority as needed at major intersections and prioritize transit stops over on-street parking. Provide sufficient lane width to accommodate standard transit vehicles where appropriate, taking into account other street classifications.

Traffic Slowing: Transit Access Streets that also have a Local Service or Neighborhood Collector traffic classification are eligible for traffic slowing devices such as speed bumps or speed cushions. Traffic slowing devices should be designed in accordance with TriMet guidelines.

Bus Stops: Stops should be located roughly every one-quarter mile, while taking into account other factors including the need to serve major destinations, activity centers, and transfer points. Stop spacing should also take into account existing sidewalk and street connectivity, with potentially closer stop spacing where sidewalk and street connectivity is more limited. On-street parking should be prohibited at bus stops in order to provide accessible waiting areas. Passenger amenities, including covered waiting areas, are appropriate along Transit Access Streets.

Local Service Transit Streets

Local Service Transit Streets primarily facilitate movement of smaller transit vehicles, including paratransit and community/jobs connector shuttles. Local Service Transit Streets seldom have regular transit service except for short street segments and do not typically include transit-specific street design elements such as bus stops. Local Service Transit Streets may be used for bus movements to and from a layover facility or bus garage, for turning around at the end of a line, or for temporary reroutes of a fixed-route line.

Land Use: Transit operations on Local Service Transit Streets should give preference to access for individual properties and to the specific needs of property owners and residents along the street.

Classification: Streets not classified as Regional Transitways, Major Transit Priority Streets, or Transit Access Streets are classified as Local Service Transit Streets.

Function: Local Service Transit Streets may be used for paratransit service, community/jobs connector service, end loops for regularly scheduled routes, or temporary detours, and may carry school buses.

Bus Stops: If needed, locate stops along Local Service Transit Streets based on adopted service standards.

Intercity Passenger Rail

Intercity Passenger Rail provides commuter and other rail passenger service.

Station Spacing: Stations are typically located one or more miles apart, depending on overall route length.

Passenger Intermodal Facilities

Passenger Intermodal Facilities serve as the hub for various passenger modes and the transfer point between modes.

Connections: Passenger Intermodal Facilities connect inter-urban passenger service with urban public transportation service and are highly accessible by all modes.

Freight Classification Descriptions (adopted 2007)

Designate a system of truck streets, railroad lines, and intermodal freight facilities. That support local, national, and international distribution of goods and services.

Freight Districts

Freight Districts are intended to provide safe and convenient truck mobility and access in industrial and employment areas serving high levels of truck traffic and to accommodate the needs of intermodal freight movement.

Land Use: Support locating industrial and employment land uses that rely on multimodal freight movement in Freight Districts.

Function: Freight District streets provide local truck access and circulation to industrial and employment land uses.

Connections: In Freight Districts, streets not classified as Regional Truckways or Priority Truck Streets are classified as Freight District streets. Freight Districts connect individual properties to Priority Truck Streets.

Design: Freight District streets should be designed to facilitate the movement of all truck types and over-dimensional loads, as practicable.

Explanation: Within Freight Districts, only Regional Truckways, Priority Truck Streets and Major Truck Streets are mapped. All streets within Freight Districts should be designed to accommodate truck movement. Streets with multiple designations should be designed to accommodate trucks and the other designated modes.

Regional Truckways

Regional Truckways are intended to facilitate interregional and movement of freight.

Land Use: Support locating industrial and employment land uses with high levels of truck activity near Regional Truckway interchanges.

Function: Provide for safe and efficient continuous-flow operation for trucks.

Connections: Provide Regional Truckway interchanges that directly serve Freight Districts and connect to Priority Truck Streets and other streets with high levels of truck activity. A ramp that connects to a Regional Truck Street is classified as a Regional Truck Street up to its intersection with a lower-classified street.

Design: Design Regional Truckways to be limited access facilities and to standards that facilitate the movement of all types of trucks.

Priority Truck Streets

Priority Truck Streets are intended to serve as the primary route for access and circulation in Freight Districts, and between Freight Districts and Regional Truckways.

Land Use: Support locating industrial and employment uses that generate high truck activity on corridors served by Priority Truck Streets.
Function: Priority Truck Streets accommodate high truck volumes and provide high-quality mobility and access.
Connections: Priority Truck Streets connect Freight Districts to Regional Truckways.
Design: Priority Truck Streets should be designed to facilitate the movement of all truck classes and over-dimensional loads, as practicable. Buffer adjacent residential uses from noise impacts, where warranted.

Major Truck Streets

Major Truck Streets are intended to serve as principal routes for trucks in a Transportation District.

Land Use: Commercial and employment land uses that generate high levels of truck activity should locate along Major Truck Streets.
Function: Major Truck Streets provide truck mobility within a Transportation District and access to commercial and employment uses along the corridor.
Connections: Major Truck Streets connect Transportation district-level truck trips to Regional Truckways. Trucks with no trip ends within a Transportation District should be discouraged from using Major Truck Streets.
Design: Major Truck Streets should accommodate all truck types, as practicable.

Truck Access Streets

Truck Access Streets are intended to serve as access and circulation routes for delivery of goods and services to neighborhood-serving commercial and employment uses.

Land Use: Support locating commercial land uses that generate lower volumes of truck trips on Truck Access Streets.
Function: Truck Access Streets provide access and circulation to land uses within a Transportation District. Non-local truck trips are discouraged from using Truck Access Streets.
Connections: Truck Access Streets should distribute truck trips from Major Truck Streets to neighborhood-serving destinations.
Design: Design Truck Access Streets to accommodate truck needs in balance with other modal needs of the street.

Local Service Truck Streets

Local Service Truck Streets are intended to serve local truck circulation and access.

Land Use: Local Service Truck Streets provide for goods and service delivery to individual commercial, employment, and residential locations outside of Freight Districts.
Function: Local Service Truck Streets should provide local truck access and circulation only.
Connections: All streets, outside of Freight Districts, not classified as Regional Truckways, Priority Truck Streets, Major Truck Streets, or Truck Access Streets are classified as Local Service Truck Streets. Local Service Truck Streets with a higher Traffic classification are the preferred routes for local access and circulation.
Design: Local Service Truck Streets should give preference to accessing individual properties and the specific needs of property owners and residents along the street. Use of restrictive signage and operational accommodation are appropriate for Local Service Truck Streets.

Railroad Main Lines

Railroad Main Lines transport freight cargo and passengers over long distances as part of a railway network.

Railroad Branch Lines

Railroad Branch Lines transport freight cargo over short distances on local rail lines that are not part of a rail network and distribute cargo to and from mail line railroads.

Freight Facilities

Freight Facilities include the major shipping and marine, air, rail, and pipeline terminals that facilitate the local, national, and international movement of freight.

Street Design Classification Descriptions

Street Design Classification Descriptions provide general design guidance based on the current and planned land use context around the street. Whenever possible, a “complete streets” approach should be taken during street design to accommodate all necessary modes and functions, taking into account the modal classifications. Where right-of-way is limited and tradeoffs must be made, refer to the modal street classifications as well as the Transportation Strategy for People Movement (Policy 9.6) to help guide decision-making regarding allocation of right-of-way. If one or more modes are still unable to be accommodated in the available right-of-way, a “complete networks” approach should be used to ensure that those modes are still accommodated on parallel routes as a part of project design.

Civic Main Streets

Civic Main Streets serve people throughout the City and are designed to emphasize multimodal access to major activity centers.

Land Use: Civic Main Streets are segments of Civic Corridors located within the Central City, Regional Centers, Town Centers, Neighborhood Centers, and other areas of intensive commercial activity. Development consists of a mix of uses that are oriented to the street.

Lanes: Civic Main Streets typically include two to four vehicle lanes, with additional turning lanes as needed. Lanes may be dedicated as transit-only or business-access-transit lanes if needed to improve transit speed and reliability.

Width: Civic Main Streets generally feature a wider right-of-way than Neighborhood Main Streets and are more often able to provide the desired space for each mode and function.

Function: Civic Main Streets should emphasize pedestrian access to adjacent land uses while also accommodating access and mobility for other modes.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Civic Main Streets should emphasize access and place-making functions (such as parking, loading, transit stops, street trees, curb extensions, and street seats) to support adjacent land use and improve the pedestrian realm. The curb zone may be used for mobility functions if space is needed to provide bicycle facilities or provide turn lanes near intersections.

Separation: Civic Main Streets have frequent street connections and support multimodal access to destinations. Sidewalks should be provided, and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic.

Design Elements: Civic Main Street design should typically include the following: wide sidewalks with a through pedestrian zone, a furnishing zone, and a frontage zone; closely-spaced pedestrian crossings; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; low vehicle speeds; medians and/or turn lanes as needed; and limited driveway access.

Design Treatment: During improvement projects, the preservation of existing vegetation, topography, vistas and viewpoints, driver perception, street lighting, and sight distance requirements should be considered.

Utilities: Consider undergrounding or reducing the visual impact of overhead utilities along Civic Main Streets.

Neighborhood Main Streets

Neighborhood Main Streets primarily serve surrounding neighborhoods and are designed to emphasize multimodal access to activity centers.

Land Use: Neighborhood Main Streets are segments of Neighborhood Corridors located within the Central City, Regional Centers, Town Centers, Neighborhood Centers, and other areas of intensive commercial activity. Development consists of a mix of uses oriented to the street.

Lanes: Neighborhood Main Streets typically include two vehicle lanes with additional turning lanes as needed,

Width: Neighborhood Main Streets generally feature a narrower right-of-way than Civic Main Streets and may not be able to accommodate the full desired space for each mode.

Function: Neighborhood Main Streets should emphasize pedestrian access to adjacent land uses while also accommodating access and mobility for other modes.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Neighborhood Main Streets should emphasize access and place-making functions (such as parking, loading, transit stops, street trees, curb extensions, and street seats) as needed to support adjacent land use and improve the pedestrian realm. The curb zone may be used for mobility functions if space is needed to provide bicycle facilities or provide turn lanes near intersections.

Separation: Neighborhood Main Streets have frequent street connections and support multimodal access to destinations. Sidewalks should be provided and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should generally be separated from motor vehicle traffic, though shared roadway facilities may be acceptable if traffic volumes and speeds are sufficiently low.

Design Elements: Neighborhood Main Street design should typically include the following: wide sidewalks with a through pedestrian zone, a furnishing zone, and a frontage zone; closely-spaced pedestrian crossings; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; low vehicle speeds; medians and/or turn lanes as needed; and limited driveway access.

Design Treatment: During improvement projects, the preservation of existing vegetation, topography, vistas and viewpoints, driver perception, street lighting, and sight distance requirements should be considered.

Utilities: Consider undergrounding or reducing the visual impact of overhead utilities along Neighborhood Main Streets.

Civic Corridors

Civic Corridors serve people throughout the City and are designed to emphasize multimodal mobility between major activity centers.

Land Use: Civic Corridors are located primarily along major transit corridors and between Civic Main Street segments, connecting the Central City, Regional Centers, Town Centers, and Neighborhood Centers. Development consists of a mix of uses that are oriented to the street.

Lanes: Civic Corridors typically include two to four vehicle lanes, with additional turning lanes as needed. Lanes may be dedicated as transit-only or business-access-transit lanes if needed to improve transit speed and reliability.

Width: Civic Corridors generally feature a wider right-of-way than Neighborhood Corridors and are more often able to provide the desired space for each mode and function.

Function: Civic Corridors emphasize mobility for all modes between major activity centers while also accommodating access to adjacent land uses along the corridor.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Civic Corridors should typically emphasize mobility functions such as bicycle facilities or turn lanes near intersections. The curb zone may be used for access functions such as parking and loading if needed to support adjacent land use.

Separation: Civic Corridors have frequent street connections. Sidewalks should be provided and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic.

Design Elements: Civic Corridor design should typically include the following: wide sidewalks with a through pedestrian zone, a furnishing zone, and a frontage zone; closely-spaced pedestrian crossings; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; low to moderate speeds; and medians and/or turn lanes as needed.

Neighborhood Corridors

Neighborhood Corridors primarily serve surrounding neighborhoods and are designed to emphasize multimodal mobility between activity centers.

Land Use: Neighborhood Corridors are primarily located along transit corridors and between segments of Neighborhood Main Streets, connecting the Central City, Regional Centers, Town Centers, and Neighborhood Centers. Development consists of a mix of uses that are oriented to the street.

Lanes: Neighborhood Corridors typically include two vehicle lanes with additional turning lanes as needed.

Width: Neighborhood Corridors generally feature a narrower right-of-way than Civic Corridors and may not be able to accommodate the full desired space for each mode.

Function: Neighborhood Corridors emphasize mobility for all modes between activity centers while also accommodating access to adjacent land uses along the corridor.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Neighborhood Corridors should emphasize mobility functions such as bicycle facilities or turn lanes near intersections. The curb zone may be used for access functions such as parking and loading if needed to support adjacent land use.

Separation: Neighborhood Corridors have frequent street connections. Sidewalks should be provided and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic, though shared roadway bicycle facilities may be acceptable if traffic volumes and speeds are sufficiently low.

Design Elements: Neighborhood Corridor design should typically include the following: wide sidewalks with a through pedestrian zone, a furnishing zone, and a frontage zone; closely-spaced pedestrian crossings; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; low to moderate speeds; and medians and/or turn lanes as needed.

Regional Corridors

Regional Corridors serve people throughout the City and are designed to emphasize multimodal mobility between cities in the region.

Land Use: Regional Corridors connect Regional, Town, and Neighborhood Centers to other cities in the region.

Lanes: Regional Corridors usually include two to four vehicle lanes. They occasionally have additional lanes in some situations, such as to allow turning movements. Lanes may be dedicated as transit-only or business-access-transit lanes if needed to improve transit speed and reliability.

Width: Regional Corridors generally feature a wider right-of-way than Community Corridors and are more often able to provide the full desired space for each mode.

Function: Regional Corridors emphasize mobility for all modes between cities while also accommodating access to adjacent land uses along the corridor.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Regional Corridors should emphasize mobility functions such as bicycle facilities or turn lanes near intersections. The curb zone may be used for access functions such as parking and loading if needed to support adjacent land use.

Separation: Regional Corridors can have moderately spaced street connections. Sidewalks should be provided and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic.

Design Elements: Regional Corridor design should typically include the following: sidewalks; pedestrian crossings where needed to serve transit stops or destinations; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; and medians and/or turn lanes as needed.

Community Corridors

Community Corridors primarily serve surrounding neighborhoods and are designed to emphasize multimodal mobility between neighborhoods.

Land Use: Community Corridors connect Regional, Town, and Neighborhood Centers to surrounding neighborhoods.

Lanes: Lanes may be dedicated as transit-only or business-access-transit lanes if needed to improve transit speed and reliability.

Width: Community Corridors generally feature a narrower right-of-way than Regional Corridors and may not be able to accommodate the full desired space for each mode.

Function: Community Corridors emphasize mobility for all modes between neighborhoods while also accommodating access to adjacent land uses along the corridor.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Community Corridors should emphasize mobility functions such as bicycle facilities or turn lanes near intersections. The curb zone may be used for access functions such as parking and loading if needed to support adjacent land use.

Separation: Community Corridors have closely spaced street connections. Sidewalks should be provided and pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be signalized or improved with median refuge islands or curb extensions as needed to provide safety and comfort. Bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic, though shared roadway bicycle facilities may be acceptable if traffic volumes and speeds are sufficiently low.

Design Elements: Community Corridor design should typically include the following: sidewalks; pedestrian crossings where needed to serve transit stops or destinations; separated bicycle facilities; way-finding; transit priority treatments as needed; vehicle lanes; and medians and/or turn lanes as needed.

Urban Throughways

Urban Throughways are designed to emphasize long-distance mobility for motor vehicle, freight, and transit trips throughout the region.

Land Use: Urban Throughways connect major activity centers, industrial areas, and intermodal facilities. Adjacent land uses sometimes orient directly to Urban Throughways.

Lanes: Urban Throughways usually have four to six vehicle lanes, with additional lanes in some situations. Dedicated high-occupancy-vehicle, freight-only, or transit-only lanes may be provided to support more efficient use of Urban Throughways.

Function: Urban Throughways primarily serve a mobility function, with little or no local access provided along the street.

Separation: Urban Throughways may be completely divided, with no left turns, or they may be mostly divided, with limited opportunities for left turns. Street connections may occur at separated grades, with access controlled by ramps, or there may be limited street connections at grade. If designed as a grade-separated freeway, pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be provided on overpasses or underpasses, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities along the corridor should be provided on parallel pathways. If designed as a limited-access highway or expressway, pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be either grade-separated or signalized, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic.

Design Elements: Urban Throughway design typically includes vehicle lanes, grade-separated or signalized pedestrian and bicycle, parallel pathways or separated facilities for pedestrian and bicycle travel, clear sightlines, median barriers, shoulders, and motor vehicle lane widths that accommodate freight movement. Where appropriate, transit priority treatments should be used to enhance transit speed and reliability. Encourage the Oregon Department of Transportation to maintain a continuous landscape along Urban Throughways that reduces the visual impacts of the throughway on motorists and adjacent land uses.

Connections: A ramp that connects to an Urban Throughway is classified as an Urban Throughway up to its intersection with a differently-classified street. An interchange between an Urban Throughway and a differently-classified street should be designed to safely accommodate all modes and provide the least possible disruption to the surrounding modal networks. Connections should be provided across Urban Throughways at closely-spaced intervals to provide greater street connectivity.

Industrial Roads

Industrial Roads are designed to emphasize freight mobility while also accommodating other modes and providing local access.

Land Use: Industrial Roads typically serve industrial areas and freight intermodal sites, with a significant percentage of trips being made by trucks. Adjacent land uses sometimes orient to the Industrial Road.

Lanes: Industrial Road design typically includes two to four vehicle lanes, with additional turning lanes as needed. Dedicated freight-only lanes or turn pockets may be provided as needed to support roadway efficiency.

Function: Industrial Roads emphasize freight mobility while accommodating other modes and providing access to industrial sites and freight districts.

Curb zone: The curb zone along Industrial Roads primarily serves mobility functions such as vehicle lanes or bike lanes. The curb zone may be used for access functions such as parking and loading at limited locations if needed to support adjacent land use.

Separation: Industrial Roads have limited street connections that may occur at the same grade or separate grades. Pedestrian and bicycle crossings should be grade-separated or signalized, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities should be separated from motor vehicle traffic.

Design Elements: Industrial Road design typically includes vehicle lanes, medians or center turn lanes where needed, limited driveway access, pullouts for bus stops, transit priority treatments, separated pedestrian and bicycle facilities, and improved pedestrian crossings located on overpasses, underpasses, or signalized at-grade intersections. Industrial Roads may also include design treatments that improve freight mobility, such as freight-only lanes, freight signal priority, and a wider turning radius at intersections.

Enhanced Greenway Corridors

Enhanced Greenway Corridors are designed to provide a network of scenic low-stress connections that prioritize walking and/or bicycling and often include natural features as well as innovative urban design and place-making elements.

Dual Classification: Streets may have an Enhanced Greenway Corridor classification in addition to another street design classification. When developing or retrofitting these streets, incorporate Enhanced Greenway Corridor design elements within the corridor.

Land Use: Enhanced Greenway Corridors connect parks, open spaces, and singular attractions throughout the City to each other and to surrounding neighborhoods via a network of scenic and low-stress walking and/or bicycling routes. They can run through a variety of different land use contexts, including residential neighborhoods, natural areas, industrial areas, and employment centers.

Design Elements: Enhanced Greenway Corridor design can take many forms, and should use flexible design treatments appropriate to adjacent land use context. Design elements may include: neighborhood greenways; traffic calming; motor vehicle diversion; multi-use paths; wide sidewalks; boardwalks; trails; separated bikeways; broad-canopy trees and landscaping; scenic views; stormwater management; underground utilities; special lighting; and way-finding. Where appropriate, pedestrian and bicycle routes may use separate parallel routes or streets along a corridor.

Greenscape Streets

Greenscape Street designs are applied to arterials where natural or informal landscapes dominate the adjacent areas and the right-of-way, such as lower-density residential areas in wooded settings.

Dual Classification: Where streets have a Greenscape Street design designation and another street design designation, consider the natural characteristics of the street during the design and implementation of street improvements.

Design Treatment: During improvement projects, consider the use of vegetated stormwater treatment techniques; minimizing impervious surfaces; preservation of existing vegetation, topography, vistas and viewpoints, driver perception, street lighting, and sight distance requirements. Vegetation may be landscaped or native, depending on the existing and desired character.

Local Streets

Local Streets are designed to complement planned land uses and reduce dependence on arterials for local circulation.

Land Use: Local Streets are multimodal, but are not intended for trucks (other than local deliveries) in residential areas. Local Streets are important for local circulation of trucks in commercial and industrial areas.

Design: Local Street design typically includes frequent street connections, sidewalks, on-street parking, stormwater facilities, and planting of street trees and ground covers (where planting strips are included). A shared street design without sidewalks may be appropriate where traffic volumes are sufficiently low.

Classification: All streets not classified as Urban Throughways, Urban Highways, Industrial Roads, Civic Main Streets, Neighborhood Main Streets, Civic Corridors, Neighborhood Corridors, Regional Corridors, or Community Corridors are classified as Local Streets for street design.

Emergency Response Classification Descriptions

Emergency Response Streets are intended to provide a network of streets to facilitate prompt emergency response.

Major Emergency Response Streets

Major Emergency Response Streets are intended to serve primarily the longer, most direct legs of emergency response trips.

Improvements: Design treatments on Major Emergency Response Streets should enhance mobility for emergency response vehicles by employing preferential or priority treatments.

Traffic Slowing: Major Emergency Response Streets that also have a Local Service or Neighborhood Collector traffic classification are eligible for speed cushions, subject to the approval of Portland Fire and Rescue. Major Emergency Response Streets that also have a District Collector or higher traffic classification are not eligible for traffic slowing devices in the future. Existing speed bumps on Major Emergency Response Streets may remain temporarily, and shall be replaced with speed cushions when streets are repaved or undergo other major modifications, subject to the approval of Portland Fire and Rescue. Speed cushions should be designed to achieve a similar level of traffic speed reduction as speed bumps.

Secondary Emergency Response Streets

Secondary Emergency Response Streets are intended to provide alternatives to Major Emergency Response Streets in cases when traffic congestion, construction, or other events occur that may cause undue delays in response times.

Improvements: Design treatments on Secondary Emergency Response Streets should enhance mobility for emergency response vehicles by employing preferential or priority treatments, while also allowing for limited traffic slowing treatments to enhance safety and livability.

Traffic Slowing: Secondary Emergency Response Streets that also have a Local Service or Neighborhood Collector traffic classification are eligible for speed cushions. Secondary Emergency Response Streets that also have a District Collector or higher traffic classification are not eligible for traffic slowing devices in the future. Existing speed bumps on Secondary Emergency Response Streets may remain temporarily, and shall be replaced with speed cushions when streets are repaved or undergo other major modifications. Speed cushions should be designed to achieve a similar level of traffic speed reduction as speed bumps.

Minor Emergency Response Streets

Minor Emergency Response Streets are intended to serve primarily the shorter legs of emergency response trips.

Classification: All streets not classified as Major Emergency Response Streets or Secondary Emergency Response Streets are classified as Minor Emergency Response Streets.

Improvements: Design and operate Minor Emergency Response Streets to allow access to individual properties by emergency response vehicles, but maintain livability on the street.

Traffic Slowing: Minor Emergency Response Streets are eligible for all types of traffic slowing devices.

Traffic Classification Descriptions

Maintain a system of traffic streets that support the movement of motor vehicles for regional, city, district, neighborhood, and local trips. For each type of traffic classification, the majority of motor vehicle trips on a street should conform to its classification description.

Regional Trafficways

Regional Trafficways are intended to serve regional traffic movement that has only one trip end in a City of Portland transportation district or to serve trips that bypass a district completely.

Safety: Regional Trafficways should make safety the highest priority. Safety countermeasures should be employed on Regional Trafficways to address identified safety risks with a focus on eliminating fatal and serious injury crashes.

Land Use/Development: Regional Trafficways should serve the Central City, regional centers, industrial areas, and intermodal facilities and should connect key freight routes within the region to points outside the region.

Connections: Regional Trafficways should connect to other Regional Trafficways, Major City Traffic Streets, and District Collectors. A ramp that connects to a Regional Trafficway is classified as a Regional Trafficway from its point of connection up to its intersection with a lower-classified street. At ramps and along access streets, accommodate safe multimodal movements.

Buffering: Adjacent neighborhoods should be buffered from the impacts of Regional Trafficways.

Dual Classification: A street with dual Regional Trafficway and Major City Traffic Street classifications should retain the operational characteristics of a Major City Traffic Street and respond to adjacent land uses.

Major City Traffic Streets

Major City Traffic Streets are intended to serve as the principal routes for interdistrict traffic that has at least one trip end within a City of Portland transportation district.

Safety: Safety should be the highest priority on Major City Traffic Streets. Safety countermeasures should be employed on Major City Traffic Streets to address identified safety risks with a focus on eliminating fatal and serious injury crashes for all modes. Major City Traffic Streets should provide separation between motor vehicles and people walking, bicycling, and using mobility devices, and provide safe multimodal crossings to destinations.

Land Use/Development: Major City Traffic Streets should provide motor vehicle connections among the Central City, regional centers, town centers, industrial areas, and intermodal facilities. Auto-oriented development should locate adjacent to Major City Traffic Streets, except within designated centers, main streets, station areas, and other areas with high pedestrian demand.

Connections: Major City Traffic Streets should serve as primary connections to Regional Trafficways and serve major activity centers in each district. Traffic with no trip ends within a City of Portland transportation district should be discouraged from using Major City Traffic Streets. Where a Major City Traffic Street intersects with a Neighborhood Collector or Local Service Traffic Street, access management and/or turn restrictions may be employed to reduce traffic delay.

On-Street Parking: On-street parking may be removed and additional right-of-way purchased to provide adequate traffic access when consistent with the street design designation of the street. Evaluate the need for on-street parking to serve adjacent land uses and improve the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists when making changes to the roadway.

Traffic Access Streets

Traffic Access Streets are intended to provide access to Central City destinations, distribute traffic within a Central City sub-district, provide connections between Central City subdistricts, and distribute traffic from Regional Trafficways and Major City Traffic Streets for access within the district. Traffic Access Streets are not intended for through-traffic with no trip ends in the district.

Safety: Safety should be the highest priority on Traffic Access Streets. Traffic Access Streets should provide frequent, safe crossings for people walking, bicycling, and using mobility devices.

Land Use/Development: Traffic Access Streets serve Central City land uses. Traffic management on Traffic Access Streets must accommodate the high-density pattern desired in the Central City.

Connections: Connections to adjoining transportation districts should be to District or Neighborhood Collectors. Intersections of Traffic Access Streets and other streets with higher or similar classifications should be signalized, where warranted, to facilitate the safe movement of traffic along each street as well as turning movements from one street to the other.

Access: Reduction in motor vehicle congestion is given less priority than: supporting pedestrian access and enhancing the pedestrian environment; maintaining on-street parking to support land uses; accommodating transit; or accommodating bicycles. Access to off-street parking is allowed and encouraged to be located on Traffic Access Streets.

Right-of-way acquisition: Right-of-way acquisition should be discouraged on Traffic Access Streets, except at specific problem locations to accommodate traffic movement and vehicle access to abutting properties.

District Collectors

District Collectors are intended to serve as distributors of traffic from Major City Traffic Streets to streets of the same or lower classification or to serve trips that both start and end within a district.

Safety: Safety should be the highest priority on District Collectors. Safety countermeasures should be employed to address identified safety risks with a focus on eliminating fatal and serious injury crashes.

Land Use/Development: District Collectors generally connect town centers, corridors, main streets, and neighborhoods to nearby regional centers and other major destinations. Land uses that attract trips from the surrounding neighbor­hoods or from throughout the district should be encouraged to locate on District Collectors. Regional attractors of traffic such as major shopping centers or arenas should be discouraged from locating on District Collectors.

Connections: District Collectors should connect to Major City Traffic Streets, other collectors, and local streets and, where necessary, to Regional Trafficways. Where a District Collector intersects with a Neighborhood Collector or Local Service Traffic Street, access management and/or turn restrictions may be employed to reduce traffic delay.

Right-of-way acquisition: Right-of-way acquisition should be discouraged on District Collectors, except at specific problem locations to accommodate traffic movement and vehicle access to abutting properties.

Neighborhood Collectors

Neighborhood Collectors are intended to serve as distributors of traffic from Major City Traffic Streets or District Collectors to Local Service Streets or to serve trips that both start and end within areas bounded by Major City Traffic Streets and District Collectors.

Safety: Safety should be the highest priority on Neighborhood Collectors. Safety countermeasures should be implemented on Neighborhood Collectors to address identified safety risks. Neighborhood Collectors should maintain slow vehicle operating speeds to accommodate safe use by all modes.

Land Use/Development: Neighborhood Collectors should connect neighborhoods to nearby centers, corridors, station communities, main streets, and other nearby destinations. New land uses and major expansions of land uses that attract a significant volume of traffic from outside the neighborhood should be discour­aged from locating on Neighborhood Collectors.

Connections: Neighborhood Collectors should connect to Major City Traffic Streets, District Collectors, and other Neighborhood Collectors, as well as to Local Service Streets. Where a Neighborhood Collector intersects with a higher-classified street, access management and/or turn restrictions may be employed to reduce traffic delay.

Traffic Calming: Traffic calming tools and traffic slowing devices may be used to improve neighborhood safety and livability, when consistent with other street classifications.

Function: The design of Neighborhood Collectors may vary over their length as the land use character changes from primarily commercial to primarily residential. All Neighborhood Collectors should be designed to operate as neighborhood streets and through traffic should be discouraged.

Right-of-way acquisition: Right-of-way acquisition should be discouraged on Neighborhood Collectors.

Local Service Traffic Streets

Local Service Traffic Streets are intended to distribute local traffic and provide access to local residences or commercial uses.

Safety: Local Service Traffic Streets should maintain slow vehicle operating speeds to accommodate safe use by all modes.

Land Use/Development: Discourage auto-oriented land uses from using Local Service Traffic Streets as their primary access.

Classification: Streets that allow motor vehicles and are not classified as Regional Trafficways, Major City Traffic Streets, Traffic Access Streets**,** District Collectors, or Neighborhood Collectors are classified as Local Service Traffic Streets.

Connections: Local Service Traffic Streets should connect neighborhoods, provide local circulation, and provide access to nearby centers, corridors, station areas, and main streets. Street segments may be closed to through traffic in some cases as long as local access and overall neighborhood connectivity is maintained.

Traffic Calming: Traffic calming tools and traffic slowing devices may be used to improve neighborhood safety and livability or if needed to support a neighborhood greenway.

Function: Local Service Traffic Streets provide local access and circulation for traffic, while often functioning as through routes for pedestrians and bicyclists. In some instances where vehicle speeds and volumes are very low, Local Service Traffic Streets may accommodate vehicles**,** pedestrians**,** and bicyclists in a shared space.

Master Street Plans

The purpose of the Master Street Plans is to increase the efficiency of the transportation system through increased street connectivity and a finer mesh of pedestrian and bikeways. A dense grid of streets helps spread local vehicle trips more evenly over the local street network and reduces congestion on the arterial system. Studies show that improved local street connectivity improves arterial system capacity by as much as 25 percent.

Studies show that distance is one of the most important factors in mode choice. The lack of a dense grid of streets and pedestrian/bicycle connections results in out-of-direction travel that is particularly discouraging to potential pedestrians and bicyclists. The result is increased use of the automobile for trips to nearby (as the crow flies) destinations. Trips need to be relatively short and direct to encourage travel on foot or by bicycle.

Good street connectivity improves emergency response times. Police, fire, and ambulance services can reach their destinations more quickly because there is less out-of-direction travel. Multiple access routes can reduce travel times and provide access options if one route is blocked.

Good local street connections can reduce traffic volumes on other streets by spreading traffic over a denser network. With more intersections, traffic also moves more slowly because side street traffic and stop signs discourage drivers from speeding.

As properties are subdivided and developed, access needs are met primarily through new streets. The City’s local street network has grown over time, as outlying areas became more urbanized or older areas are redeveloped. In the past, development was not always required to address connections to adjacent areas as well as internal circulation. The result has been large areas of the City with poor connectivity, particularly in newer areas where the counties previously regulated development.

State Requirements

Street connectivity must be part of transportation system plans (TSPs) and adopting Ordinances. The Oregon Administrative Rule for State Land Use Goal 12, Transportation, Section 660-012-0020, Elements of Transportation Systems Plans, requires:

A road plan for a system of arterials and collectors and standards for the layout of local streets and other important non-collector street connections… The standards for the layout of local streets shall provide for safe and convenient bike and pedestrian circulation necessary to carry out OAR 660-012-045(3)(b).

The State Transportation Planning Rule (TPR) states that the intent of the requirement is to provide guidance on the spacing of future extensions and connections along existing and future streets that are needed to provide reasonably direct routes for bicycle and pedestrian travel. The rule referenced above goes on to state:

On-site facilities shall be provided which accommodate safe and convenient pedestrian and bicycle access from within new subdivisions, multi-family developments, planned developments, shopping centers, and commercial districts to adjacent residential areas and transit stops, and to neighborhood activity centers within one-half mile of the development. Single-family residential developments shall generally include streets and accessways. Pedestrian circulation through parking lots should generally be provided in the form of accessways.

The TPR also states that local jurisdictions should establish their own standards or criteria for providing streets and accessways consistent with the intent stated above. This may be accomplished through standards for spacing of streets or accessways, and standards for excessive out-of-direction travel. The TPR defines ‘safe and convenient’ access as being:

  • Reasonably free from hazards

  • Meeting the needs of cyclists and pedestrians, considering destination and length of trip

Metro Requirements

The Regional Transportation Functional Plan (RTFP), adopted in 2010 (Ordinance 10-1241B) and updated in 2012, requires jurisdictions to implement two types of street plans:

  1. Conceptual street plans that:
  • Map contiguous areas of vacant and redevelopable parcels of five or more acres planned or zoned for residential or mixed-use development

  • Identify appropriate connections to adjacent areas.

  • Demonstrate opportunities to extend and connect to existing streets, provide direct public right-of-way routes, and limit the potential of cul-de-sac and other closed-end street designs

  1. A street map for new residential or mixed-use development that will require construction of a new street(s) that:
  • Responds to and expands on the conceptual street plan map

  • Provides for street connections no further apart than 530 feet, except where prevented by barriers such as topography, railroads, freeways, pre-existing development, or water features where regulations do not allow construction of or prescribe different standards for streets

  • Provides bicycle and/or pedestrian connections when full street connections are not possible, no further apart than 330 feet, except where prevented by barriers as noted above

  • Limits the use of cul-de-sac or closed street systems

  • Includes street cross-sections

Areas meeting connectivity requirements

Many areas of Portland meet the RTP connectivity standards or are not required to have master street plans. Areas not required to meet connectivity standards include industrial sanctuaries, open space, and protected environmental areas.

Existing Master Street Plans

Master Street Plans retained by the TSP

The TSP retains the following street plans, which were not changed since the Transportation System Plan was last updated in 2007:

  • Bridgeton Neighborhood Street Plan

  • Airport Way Street Plan

  • Southwest District Master Street Plan

  • South Portland Circulation Study

  • St. Johns Town Center Master Street Plan

  • Multnomah County Unincorporated Urban Pockets

Master Street Plans updated or added since 2007

The following Master Street Plans were completed or updated since the TSP was last updated in 2007; they have since been adopted into the Comprehensive Plan. Although they are not specifically intended to meet the State and regional requirements, they do function as Master Street Plans. These plans cover the following areas:

  • Gateway Regional Center

  • Airport Way (Columbia Corridor)

  • Bridgeton (Northeast district adjacent to Marine Drive)

  • South Portland (west end of the Ross Island Bridge)

  • South Waterfront (Central City)

  • River District (Central City)

  • Cully Local Street Plan

  • Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan

  • Tryon-Stephens Headwaters Neighborhood Street Plan

Each plan or study is summarized below, along with maps derived from the original documents.

South Waterfront District Street Plan, Criteria, and Standards

Background

In 1996, the Portland City Council accepted the City Engineer’s Report titled North Macadam District Street Plan, which identified and classified a street system for the North Macadam District. On January 20, 2003, City Council adopted amendments to the Central City Plan and updated the District’s special design guidelines and the zoning code. At the same time, City Council changed the North Macadam District name to South Waterfront District (the District). By authority of the City Engineer under Title 17 City Code, the South Waterfront Street Plan, Criteria and Standards was amended in 2007 providing updated design criteria and standard details for the District’s public rights-of-way. The 2009 document update amends the North District (the area south of Sheridan St and north of Gibbs St) rights-of-way alignment and standards to accommodate future light rail and property development, as well as expanded streetcar service and bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

The South Waterfront District of the Central City of Portland lies along the Willamette River and south of downtown. The district boundaries are the River, Interstate 5, the Marquam Bridge and SW Hamilton Court. Adopted City policy envisions this as a mixed-use neighborhood with significant residential development along the River and commercial development focused along transit corridors. With just over one mile of River frontage the District contains approximately 140 acres. Some land is developed or being developed and some land is vacant land or has redevelopment potential.

The primary development constraint in the District is transportation access to and from regional highway and transit systems. The South Waterfront Plan of January 20, 2003 includes a vision, policies and an Urban Design Plan that promotes high density housing and commercial development with a full range of businesses that contribute to the region’s job growth. The vision also includes frequent public connections to the river, limiting the size and amount of surface parking lots, and integrating development and services.

In 1998 the North Macadam District Street Design Standards and Criteria Plan: Transportation Report considered and analyzed South Waterfront’s limited access and adjacency to I-5 and Ross Island Bridge ramps. The analysis included the three district portal intersections: River Parkway and Harbor Drive (north), Curry and Macadam (center) and Bancroft and Macadam (south). The analysis was based on the District’s 20-year goals for accommodating 10,000 jobs and 3,000 housing units and a 30 percent mode split. The housing goal has since been increased to 5,000 units.

Conclusions were:

  • Bancroft and Macadam portal improvements would accommodate traffic growth and transit access at acceptable levels of service. South Waterfront (North Macadam District) became part of the Central City in 1988.

  • Moving the central portal from Gibbs to Curry and improving the Curry and Macadam intersection would better accommodate traffic operation, growth and access from I-5 to the District.

  • As the District’s growth nears 10,000 jobs and 5,000 housing units, portal access will degrade and as a result function at a marginally acceptable level.

  • River Parkway and Harbor Drive would operate at acceptable levels although backups on I-5 and Naito Parkway could interfere with operations on a more frequent basis in the future.

The 1998 transportation analysis demonstrated that while the District will experience increased congestion over time, the portal capacity with the identified portal improvements and increased transit service should continue to provide acceptable levels of service to the District and the regional transportation system.

Since the 1998 report, plans for portal improvements have been altered. Through the South Portal Study, conducted in 2006, the recommended south portal shifted south to Hamilton St and Macadam. In addition, the planned central portal improvements at Curry have been scaled back and north portal improvements at River Parkway and Harbor Drive have been added. In fact, in 2009 the Portland Bureau of Transportation updated the technical analysis through the North Macadam Transportation Development Strategy (resolution no. 36696 adopted April 8, 2009). The report identified multi-modal project priorities and a funding strategy to guide project implementation necessary to support continued development of the urban renewal area, including portal improvements.

The 2007 update of the South Waterfront District Street Plan, Criteria and Standards primarily responded to development in the Central District and completion of infrastructure projects, including the Portland Streetcar extension to Lowell St and the Portland Aerial Tram to Oregon Health Sciences University. Transportation studies, such as the 2004 South Waterfront District Transportation Improvements Evaluation and 2006 South Portal Study had also been completed. Major updates included changes to the street lighting design standards, certain street furniture standards, and the modification of the street plan based on the recommendations of the South Portal Study and the new Greenstreet Policy (Resolution no. 36500 adopted in April of 2007). Other changes included modest refinements to various street dimensional standards developed through preliminary engineering and construction of these streets and to refinements of various performance criteria.

South Waterfront 2009 Update

Since the 2007 update, the City of Portland has endorsed the Locally Preferred Alternative (LPA) for the Portland to Milwaukie Light Rail alignment. This alignment extended light rail south into the North District and included bus service and streetcar utilizing the same alignment. In addition, the OHSU Schnitzer Campus master plan and the North Macadam Transportation Development Strategy report, with a prioritized list of multi-modal projects and a funding strategy, have been completed. These activities generated the need to refine and update various elements of the Street Plan. Major updates include changes to the street alignments and designations in the Concept Street Plan Map, updates of some street widths in the Right-of-Way Width Map changes to street descriptions in the Street Classification and Function Table, and adjustments to the Standard Street Sections.

Specific changes made to the Concept Street Plan map are as follows:

  • Bond Ave extends north through the District.

  • Bond Ave is one-way northbound through the District.

  • Moody Ave is one-way southbound for vehicular traffic through the District; and one-way southbound for streetcar south of Woods St.

  • Moody Ave remains two-way streetcar north of Woods St.

  • Moody Ave includes a two-way bike path along the west-side to minimize bike/streetcar interactions.

  • The grades of Moody Ave and Porter St are raised to a level consistent with the Willamette River Crossing Partnership findings necessary for light rail.

  • Porter St carries light rail, streetcar and bus in two directions only; private vehicles are not accommodated on this street.

  • River Pkwy (south of the Marquam Bridge) terminates at Woods St.

  • Alignments are adjusted for local east-west streets north of Gibbs St.

  • “Special Design Area” beneath the Ross Island Bridge has been relocated to reflect the location of the potential active-use park. Grover St is aligned on either side of the Ross Island Bridge.

Gateway Regional Center Street Plan

Background

The 2040 Growth Concept identifies the Gateway regional center as the only regional center in Portland. Planning for Gateway began with the Outer Southeast Community Plan and continued with the Opportunity Gateway Concept Plan and Redevelopment Strategy. City Council accepted Opportunity Gateway in February 2000 (Resolution No. 35867). The Outer Southeast Community Plan resulted in a plan district and transit-supportive zoning

The Central Gateway portion of the Gateway District Master Street Plan was amended in 2009. This amendment was based on a recommendation in the Central Gateway Redevelopment Strategy, which was adopted by the Portland Development Commission in August 2007. The Central Gateway Redevelopment Strategy concluded that the street plan for Central Gateway should be updated, with the goal of increasing connectivity in Central Gateway, providing greater certainty to developers about street requirements and opening up parcels to redevelopment.

Street Connectivity

A discontinuous network of streets and sidewalks, high volumes of through-traffic, and underutilized property characterize Gateway regional center. Access to the transit stations in Gateway’s northwest corner and at 102^nd^ and Burnside is problematic. Discontinuous streets discourage walking and bicycling, resulting in significant out-of-direction travel for all modes.

Increasing street connectivity would disperse trips among many alternate routes, thereby reducing congestion, shortening trip lengths, and increasing the mode split for alternatives to the automobile.

Concept Plan Map

The Opportunity Gateway Concept Plan and Redevelopment Strategy is intended to serve as the ‘appropriate vision’ for the redevelopment of Gateway as a regional center. The concept plan map is a picture of the regional center’s redevelopment potential and build-out in 2019. While the plan map affixes buildings and parks to specific locations, the reality is that new construction will appear somewhat differently. While new streets and connections are identified, they are also subject to change to respond to development opportunities. The Opportunity Gateway report states: “It is rigid enough to be a statement of what is and is not desirable in the Regional Center, and flexible enough to be useful even as redevelopment circumstances change.” The map graphically depicts the vision described in the report.

The concept plan map calls for a traditional block configuration, which will help unify the regional center’s character. Some of the proposed new connections would greatly change existing circulation patterns. Northeast Multnomah between Fred Meyer’s and Mervyn’s at the Gateway Shopping Center is shown as a fully functional street, intended to help disperse traffic associated with the transit center. In the southern part of the regional center, several new public streets are shown in the Mall 205 and Plaza 205 properties, breaking up what are now large expanses of parking. Pedestrian pathways connect important routes and destinations where full streets are not possible or appropriate, such as between SE 105^th^ and the Adventist Medical Center.

As the major north-south arterial, 102^nd^ Avenue is the spine of the district and is targeted for improvements for all modes. Changes to 99^th^ Avenue would allow it to act as an additional north-south carrier, improving access for development projects and creating a new local identity the length of the district. Major east-west streets (Stark/Washington, Halsey/Weidler, Burnside, and Glisan) will continue to carry significant volumes of through-traffic. Better local north-south street connections will link the two main large shopping areas together, and improved connectivity will be provided within each of these shopping areas.

Central Gateway Street Plan 2009

The Central Gateway Master Street Plan revision was developed to provide flexibility for connections while maintaining larger parcels for redevelopment, recognizing existing parcel lines, provide connections on the local network without altering the district or neighborhood collectors and to foster redevelopment in the City’s only Regional Center. Criteria were established for consideration in the proposed plan. Other goals of the plan included aligning streets on parcel boundaries for shared investment in right-of-way improvements; consider common or multiple parcel ownership; minimize parcel impacts and maintain reminder parcels; preserve some large parcels or contiguous ownership parcels; discourage cut-through traffic while providing access; discourage off-set intersections; consider potential spacing of crosswalks or signals.

With these criteria and goals, a revised street plan for Central Gateway was developed. The revised street plan provided needed multi-modal connections within the Central Gateway area without changing the function of the major traffic streets and collectors surrounding the area, such as 102nd Ave., Glisan, Burnside, and Stark.

Characteristics of the revised street plan:

  • East-west connections between 97th Ave. and 102nd Ave. on Flanders St. and Davis St. North-south connection on 100th Ave. between Oak St. and Burnside and also between Oregon St. and Pacific St.

  • North–south connection on 101st Ave. between Stark St. and approximately Flanders St., improving multi-modal access to the light-rail station on 102nd and Burnside.

  • Internal connection on Oregon St. approximately Hoyt St., Coach St., and 101st Ave.

  • Vacating portions of 97th Ave. to allow developable parcels near I-205. This would continue to allow multi-modal access to the parcels.

  • Maintaining existing large parcels for development and redevelopment while also providing public bicycle and pedestrian access ways. Large parcels would have the option to have public bike and pedestrian access ways on the site rather than full streets, as was required in the prior master street plan. Public bike and pedestrian access ways will be required on certain blocks such that spacing of public connections shall be no more than 330 feet where full street connections are more than 530 feet. Additionally, pedestrian connections would be required throughout Central Gateway.

Because large parcels were maintained for development and redevelopment, the revised street plan does not include some of the proposed streets that were in the previous in the street plan for the Gateway District. These include:

  • Extension of Oregon St. between 97th Ave. and 98th Ave. However, the revised street plan proposes to keep the Irving St. alignment as existing between 97th Ave. and 100th Ave., whereas the prior plan showed this segment as vacated.

  • Full street connection of Hoyt St. between 97th Ave. and 104th Ave.

  • Full street connection of roughly the Davis St. alignment between 97th Ave. and 103rd Ave. The revised street plan proposes that some portions of the alignment would be full street while other portions would be pedestrian connection.

  • Extension of 101st Ave. between Washington St. and Pacific St. The revised street plan proposes a mix of full streets and pedestrian connections on some portions of the 101st Ave. alignment. Other portions of the alignment would not have connections. Unlike as in the prior plan, the revised street plan does not intend for 101st Ave. to become a neighborhood collector. Rather, 99th Ave. would be a through street, with 100th Ave. also providing significant connectivity.

  • Extension of 100th Ave. between Oak St. and Washington St. The revised street plan does not include any connectivity at this location. Vehicles, pedestrians, and bicycles could access the area from connections at 97th Ave., and 101st.

Cully Neighborhood Local Street Plan (2012)

The Cully Commercial Corridor and Local Street Plan was adopted by Resolution 36952 in August 2012. Its development was funded by a Transportation Growth Management Grant from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Its recommendations were also influenced by the Portland Plan (April 2012) which had recommendations related to alternative right-of-way improvements, developing new options for unimproved rights-of-way and accelerating the creation of safe pedestrian connections. The Cully Neighborhood Local Street Plan identified new street or pedestrian/bicycle connections to improve street connectivity and address gaps in transportation networks.

River District Master Street Plan

Revisions to the River District Master Street Plan were adopted by City Council on May 24^th^ 2018.

Southwest and Far Southeast

The City completed master street plans for the Southwest and Far Southeast transportation districts in June 2001. These two master street plans satisfy the State and regional requirements to identify the location and type of new local street connections. The methodology and criteria used to develop the plans are described briefly below. The SW and Far SE Master Street Plan – Final Report and Recommendations contains quarter-section level maps and tables that detail the recommended connections. The report identifies three objectives to be met:

  • Reduce the uncertainty in the development review process regarding when and where new street connections will be an issue.

  • Provide for better coordination of the local street system development.

  • Comply with the mandates of the State Transportation Planning Rule and Regional Transportation Plan for street connectivity.

The Southwest and Far Southeast master street plans were developed through a number of steps, with mapping associated with each step:

Step One

  • Define blocks in the study area that meet the spacing standard.

  • Define areas being excluded (areas where streets are complete or underway; parcels zoned as park, open space, or industrial; religious or educational institutions).

Step Two

  • Define remaining areas that have development or redevelopment potential (land value greater than improvement value; different Comprehensive Plan and zoning designations; two-acre or larger parcels).

  • Define development constraints (street spacing not met, but parcels don’t meet development potential).

Step Three

  • Define blocks with barriers to connectivity (environmentally constrained).

Step Four

  • Group the remaining areas into focus areas.

Step Five

  • Define locations of new connections.

  • Determine specificity of connections – specific points or along a block face.

  • Apply type of connection – street or pedestrian/bicycle.

The plans’ recommendations include information about the location, level of alignment specificity, type of connection, barriers, presence of environmental zones, traffic impacts, field notes, and comments from the public or technical staff.

While the master street plans identify a number of future connections, the absence of a connection does not mean a connection is not needed or feasible. All areas within the study areas are still subject to relevant policy and spacing standards.

Far Southeast Portland Master Street Plans

Study Area

The Far Southeast Portland Master Street Plan includes nearly all of the Far Southeast Transportation District, from I-205 east to the City limit, and from Burnside south to the City limits. Some portions of this area are excluded from the plan: the Gateway regional center because a street plan already exists, and Burnside light rail station areas (102^nd^ to 162^nd^, NE Glisan to SE Stark), where master street plans will be completed as part of TSP refinement plans.

Land Use

The Far Southeast is predominantly in residential use, with interspersed commercial/retail uses. Commercial/retail uses are located in strip commercial development along arterials such as 122^nd^ and Division or in malls such as Mall 205 or the San Rafael Shopping Center. Institutions, such as colleges, hospitals, and schools, can create barriers, but offer limited opportunities for street connections. Cemeteries and parks also occupy significant tracts of land in the district. There are only a few pockets of industrial uses, principally near the Lents town center.

Zoning

The Far Southeast Master Street Plan Study area includes virtually all of the various City commercial zones, except some designed specifically for the Central City. The area includes nearly all the residential zones, excluding only the most dense zones. The employment and industrial zoning currently in place is confined primarily to the southern edge of the district. Significant tracts of open space zoning exist, with Powell Butte the largest. Environmental overlays are applied to areas with steep slopes and near streams and wetland areas, principally in the southeast portion of the district.

Area Character

Terrain and the density of development largely determine the area’s character. Some less developed areas display a rural appearance, with open fields and large out-buildings. The majority of the district has a more suburban appearance, with large tracts of single-dwelling homes on medium to large lots. Some areas display a more urban character, with smaller lots and buildings closer to the street. Steep slopes with numerous streams and gullies are located in the southern portion of the area, along Johnson Creek and in Pleasant Valley.

Long-term county stewardship, along with recent population growth, has resulted in relatively few public streets in some areas, and large redevelopable parcels of land. Many of the area’s local service streets and collectors are not fully improved. The lack of sidewalks results in a street system that is not particularly pedestrian friendly. The lack of public streets contributes significantly to out-of-direction travel patterns, and very wide major arterials carry many local trips as well as through-trips.

Issues and Constraints

Barriers (such as terrain, streams, and existing development) will continue to limit a connected street system, including bicycle/pedestrian accessways, in Far Southeast Portland. With expected increases in the number of households and dwelling units in the area, however, completion of the local street system will be needed even more to provide multimodal access to areas of new development and from those areas to neighborhood activity centers, transit, and arterials.

Outer Powell Blvd Conceptual Plan Design (2012)

The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation, in coordination with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), developed a conceptual design plan for Outer SE Powell Blvd. from the I-205 to SE 174th Ave (city limits). This stretch of SE Powell Blvd is designated State Highway No. 26. Therefore, ODOT has jurisdiction along SE Powell Blvd.

The plan addressed the needs for Outer Powell Blvd in a 20-year time frame. The plan identified improvements and right-of-way width needs that will allow Outer SE Powell Blvd to serve vehicle traffic movement while also improving the safety, accessibility and the aesthetic environment for pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders. The Outer Powell Blvd Conceptual Plan Design was adopted by Resolution 36931 in February 2013.

A component of the plan was improving local connectivity around Powell Blvd. A Local Streets and Access-ways Report identified additional connections in the area.

Six types of connections were identified in the Local Streets and Accessways Report.

  • Separated In-Roadway Bicycle Facilities. Facilities that separate the bicycle travel lane from the motor vehicle lane with striping or a physical barrier. Examples are a standard bike lane, buffered bike lane, and cycle track.

  • Bicycle Boulevards/Advisory Bike Lanes. Facilities on low traffic volume streets where through movement of bicycles is given priority over motor vehicles Advisory bike lanes include dashed bike lane striping and single motor vehicle lane. Vehicles are allowed to enter bike lanes to pass each other.

  • Pedestrian and Bicycle Pathways. These facilities are outside of the roadway right-of way and fully separated from the roadway.

  • Street Connections. New local streets built to City standards. Sidewalks accommodate pedestrian travel and bike travel share the roadway with vehicles.

  • Pedestrian and Bicycle Crossings. Two types of crossings were identified. The first type is provided by the existing traffic signals. New signals were not recommended. The second crossing type is shown at generally desired locations between signalized intersections. Specific design treatments were not determined (e.g. pedestrian refuge island, HAWK signal, etc.)

  • Potential Street Realignment. Opportunities to realign existing streets through future redevelopment. The objective is to align intersections on opposite sides of Powell Boulevard to improve pedestrian crossings or access to transit stops.

Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan

(Adopted by Resolution No. 37157 October 15, 2015)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), in partnership with the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability and Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), developed the Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan. The Division-Midway Neighborhood Street Plan was developed to help improve local street and pathway connectivity in several East Portland neighborhoods. The project area is centered on SE Division Street, a designated “Main Street” in the Metro Region 2040 Growth Concept Plan and the study area was bounded by SE 112th Ave, SE 148th Ave, SE Stark and SE Holgate and includes portions of the Hazelwood, Mill Park, Centennial and Powellhurst Gilbert neighborhoods.

Goals and Objectives: The overall goal is to develop a Neighborhood Street Plan that can better increase street connectivity and multi-modal travel options within the project area. Objectives:

  • Establish a more connected local street and path network

  • Create safer walking and bicycling routes to neighborhood destinations, transit and the regionally designated SE Division Main Street

  • Define the range of options for improving local streets, including use of Portland Street By Street design options.

  • Inform future improvements to be built over-time by property owners, developers and the City.

The Street Plan identified implementation methods for introducing new street and pathway connections and options for improving deficient local streets. The plan recommended adding New Future Public Connections across Existing Private Property.

Southwest Portland Master Street Plans
Tryon-Stephens Headwaters Neighborhood Street Plan

(Adopted by Resolution No. 37162, November 2015)

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) and the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) developed the Tryon-Stephens Headwaters Neighborhood Street Plan to create a strategy to complete the transportation network and stormwater system within the study area. The Tryon-Stephens plan provides a strategy for enhancing neighborhood access to local destinations by looking comprehensively at street and drainage issues. The Tryon-Stephens Street Plan sets a framework for tailoring improvements to individual streets based on the adjacent land use, street character, and natural setting.

The plan recommends modifying the City of Portland’s Southwest Master Street Plan (2001) to add future local street/pathway connections in two locations within the study area, as shown on the following map (page 52 of the Tryon-Stevens plan). Recommended new connections are in the Hillsdale neighborhood linking SW Nevada Court to SW Vermont Street between SW 26th Avenue and Capitol Hill Road, and in the Markham Neighborhood linking SW Marigold Street between SW 23rd and SW 26th Avenues.

Areas not covered by Master Street Plans

Master Street plans have not been completed for all or parts of the North, Northeast, Far Northeast, Southeast, Northwest, and Central City districts. Other areas were excluded from the Southwest and Far Southeast Master Street Plans: the east light rail corridor (102nd to the city limits, NE Glisan to SE Stark), the Hillsdale town center, and the West Portland town center. Master Street plans for these areas will be completed as refinement plans of the TSP. Until such plans are completed, the location and implementation of new street and pedestrian/bicycle connections will be governed by Title 17: Public Improvements, and Title 33: Planning and Zoning, requirements in City Code. Title 17 regulations govern developing or redeveloping sites that do not include a land division, and Title 33 regulations govern developing or redeveloping sites that do include a land division. The spacing standards in each title are 530 feet for full street connections and 330 feet for pedestrian/bicycle connections where full street connections are not feasible.

Modal Plans

Motor Vehicle

Comp Plan policies were adopted that address motor vehicles. Specific policies include Policy 9.6 Transportation for People Movement; 9.7 Moving goods and delivery services. Policy 9.38 Automobile Transportation which states: Maintain acceptable levels of mobility and access for private automobiles while reducing overall vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and negative impacts of private automobiles on the environment and human health. This is a new policy specific to motor vehicles in the 2016 Comp Plan.

Public Transportation

TriMet Service Enhancement Plans

PBOT worked with Trimet, riders, residents, neighborhood groups, governments, schools and businesses to plan improvements to transit service. The long-term vision developed identifies and prioritizes opportunities to improve bus service as well as pedestrian and bike access to transit.

[http://news.trimet.org/category/service-enhancement-plans/]{.underline}

Growing Transit Communities Plan (GTC)

The Growing Transit Communities Plan is an effort to identify and prioritize the most beneficial improvements that would make getting to the bus and using the bus, a safer and more convenient option along sections of 3 bus lines 87, 77, and 20. The purpose of the GTC Plan is to determine a package of transportation investments on a corridor level that would best create transit-oriented neighborhoods, places where transit (along with walking and bicycling for short trips) is truly the mode of choice for getting to and from work, school, shops, or other destinations. Frequent transit service is one essential component of a transit-oriented community, but other components include safe access to transit, bus stop quality, sidewalk and bikeway network connections, crossings of busy streets, and the overall built environment. Deficiencies in these other factors often lead to lower ridership, and make frequent service less viable to implement.

The Portland Plan and the Climate Action Plan have established a mode split goal of 25% of all trips on transit by 2035, and the 2035 Regional Transportation Plan includes a goal of tripling transit mode share over 2005 levels. Increasing transit service frequency and targeted investments in access to transit are ways to increase transit ridership. Implementation of this Plan will help the City reach these policy goals and accommodate future growth.

Data from Metro’s 2011 Travel Activity Survey indicates that 6.6% of trips in Portland are currently on transit, increasing only 20% between 1994 and 2011. Additional support for transit is needed, as the current growth trend is not aggressive enough to meet mode share targets and accommodate the transportation needs of expected population and employment growth. The Comprehensive Plan, prioritizes transit-oriented centers and corridors to accommodate expected population and employment growth while minimizing traffic growth. TriMet developed its Service Enhancement Plans to present long-term visions for the future development of the transit system. These two planning efforts combined work together to provide high-frequency and high-capacity transit to areas identified for high-density residential and employment land uses. This coordination results in a concentration of compact, 20-minute neighborhoods where transit is the mode of choice for longer trips to other parts of the City or region.

Transit and higher density zoning alone are not sufficient to produce the levels of development and transit use to meet regional goals. Without safe pedestrian and bicycle access to transit, high-quality transit stops, fast and reliable transit operations, parking management, and effective demand management, the automobile will likely be the preferred mode. TriMet’s future investment and improving and expanding the frequent transit network will be prioritized based on the level of local access investments, transit-supportive policies, and priority treatments. TriMet and the City will work together to update corridors with transit-supportive investments to help support both frequent transit service and transit-oriented development. Targeted investments in access to transit, stop amenities, transit priority treatments, and demand management are ways to increase transit ridership. This project will help the City reach the adopted Climate Action Plan goal of achieving a 25% transit mode share by 2035. Making early investments before anticipated development will ensure future residents and employees find transit to be an attractive travel choice when they are moving or changing jobs and are most receptive to a change in mode choice. Transit-supportive investments have additional benefits by improving pedestrian and bicycle networks and enhancing transit service used by a wider population than those who work and live along the corridor. These investments will also help corridors meet TriMet’s criteria for frequent service expansion, allowing the City to leverage investments for increased transit service hours.

For more information please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/68193

Recent Transit Improvements

Streetcar Loop

Since first opening service from NW 23rd Avenue to Portland State University in 2001, PBOT and Portland Streetcar, Inc. have worked together to continuously fine tune and improve the efficiency and reliability of Portland Streetcar. A subcommittee of the Citizen Advisory Committee created a list of projects that could reduce travel times and improve reliability. The next suggestion on the list is the consolidation of stops.

https://portlandstreetcar.org/news/2016/01/track-to-the-future

Light Rail

The Orange and Green Lines were built to connect to Clackamas Town Center (Green) and Downtown Milwaukee (Orange). The Orange line opened in September 2015 with the addition of the Tilikum Crossing, a bridge that does not accommodate motor vehicles but is for bikes, peds and transit.

Southwest Corridor Plan (SWC)

A key part of the Southwest Corridor Plan is a proposed 12-mile MAX light rail line from downtown Portland to Tigard and Bridgeport Village in Tualatin, along with numerous walking, biking and roadway projects to help people access stations. This plan has been created as a partnership of seven cities, Washington County and the Metro Council, along with TriMet and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The Southwest Corridor Plan includes:

  • A new 12-mile MAX line from downtown Portland to Tigard and Bridgeport Village in Tualatin Learn more

  • Roadway, bicycle and pedestrian projects to help people get to transit

  • A strategy to promote equitable development in the corridor when light rail is constructed

  • A specific equitable housing strategy for Tigard and Portland along the light rail line

  • A Shared Investment Strategy for transportation improvements that connect the corridor’s communities well beyond the proposed light rail line

http://www.oregonmetro.gov/public-projects/southwest-corridor-plan

Division Transit Project

The Division Transit Project will improve travel between Downtown Portland, Southeast and East Portland and Gresham with easier, faster and more reliable bus service. Metro began planning for the project in 2014 by convening a project Steering Committee and holding a series of public open houses and meetings. Metro transferred project leadership to TriMet on December 20, 2016. The Division Transit Project will include design elements such as improved pedestrian crossings at stations, and coordination with other efforts, such as the City of Portland’s Outer SE Division Near-Term Safety Strategy and the Powell-Division Transit and Development Project (Powell-Division), to make Division safer for all users.

https://trimet.org/division/index.htm

Fareless Square discontinued

Fareless Square was created in 1975 to reduce emissions and auto traffic in the downtown area. In 2010, TriMet voted to eliminate free bus service in Fareless Square, which did cover downtown, Old Town, the convention center and Lloyd Center.

Streetcar plan and extensions

Adopted by Portland City Council on September 9, 2009, the Portland Streetcar System Concept Plan (SSCP) identifies potential corridors that will build upon the success of the existing streetcar system and expand service to best serve Portland’s neighborhoods and business districts. The streetcar is a key element in the city’s plan for more sustainable future growth.

Streetcar System Concept Plan Mission Statement

The Portland Streetcar System Concept Plan can play a key role in shaping the City by:

  • Reinforcing walkable and economically diverse neighborhoods and vibrant main streets.

  • Encouraging sustainable and equitable development and infrastructure.

  • Supporting reduction of vehicle trips.

  • Supporting greater accessibility, housing options, employment, and economic development.

Streetcar System Concept Plan Goals

A successful streetcar system will:

  1. Help Portland achieve its peak oil and sustainability strategies;

  2. Provide an organizing structure and catalyst for Portland’s future growth along streetcar corridors; and

  3. Integrate streetcar corridors into Portland’s existing neighborhoods.

Successful streetcar corridors need to:

1. Be a viable transit option with adequate ridership.

2. Have (re)development potential.

3. Demonstrate community support to make the changes necessary for a successful streetcar corridor

The SSCP project has expanded the conversation about streetcar from a downtown incrementally-growing transit mode into citywide strategic economic development tool and neighborhood circulator.

For more information please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/321180

TSP: Transit Classification Descriptions

Transit Classification Descriptions and Maps were updated as part of TSP3, Section 4.

Pedestrian

Comp Plan Policies

Comp Plan policies 9.6 and 9.17-19 are pedestrian policies. There are additional policies in Chapter 8, 3 and 4 that address pedestrian infrastructure and services.

Pedestrian Master Plan (PedPDX)

PedPDX is Portland’s citywide pedestrian plan. It will prioritize sidewalk and crossing improvements and other investments to make walking safer and more comfortable across the city. The plan will identify the key strategies and tools we will use to make Portland a truly great walking city.

PedPDX is an update of the 1998 Pedestrian Master Plan (PMP). Since 1998, the PMP has guided pedestrian-friendly design and policies in Portland, and has served as a model across the country. The PMP developed a project list that has guided investment over the past 18 years.

There is more we can do to make Portland a great walking city. Despite consistent investment in the pedestrian network, significant gaps and deficiencies remain, and new policy questions have emerged. An incomplete pedestrian network limits the City’s ability to absorb growth and meet the livability and access needs of residents, including safe walking access to public transit and essential services. The 1998 Pedestrian Master Plan has served inner Portland well, but has often struggled to provide adequate guidance for areas such as East Portland and Southwest Portland that present environmental challenges and right-of-way constraints.

PedPDX will reflect changes to pedestrian policy and design best practices that have emerged since the original Pedestrian Master Plan was adopted, including an emerging understanding of transportation equity and a Vision Zero approach to pedestrian safety. The updated plan will ensure that the City continues to lead the way in walkability, and will allow Portland to absorb growth in a sustainable way that encourages residents to walk, whether for commuting, shopping, going to school, or recreation.

The PedPDX citywide pedestrian plan will:

  • Establish a clear plan vision, goals, and objectives

  • Identify gaps and needs in Portland’s pedestrian network (including needs for new sidewalks, crossings, and other pedestrian improvements)

  • Prioritize needs to ensure that we are directing funding to locations with the greatest needs first (project prioritization will reflect the City’s commitment to improving equity outcomes and reaching our Vision Zero goal)

  • Articulate the strategies, actions, and tools we will use to improve walking conditions within prioritized areas, and across the city

  • Identify context-sensitive design solutions for various part of the city

  • Update the City’s pedestrian classifications and designations, which help drive pedestrian design requirements

  • Identify the performance measures we will use to track our progress implementing the plan over time

Future phases of PedPDX will update the 1998 Pedestrian Design Guide.

For more information please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/72504

Other Pedestrian Programs and Projects

Other pedestrian programs, planning efforts and improvements include:

  • Sunday Parkways

  • Safe Routes to School

  • VisionZero

  • City Trails Program

  • SW Trails

  • ADA Transition Plan

  • ADA Curb Ramp Program

  • Safety Programs

  • Educational Programs

  • Connected Centers

  • Local Connectivity Plans

  • Tilikum Crossing (bridge)

Bicycle

Comp Plan Policies

Comp Plan policies 9.6 and 9.20 - 9.21 are bicycle policies. There are additional policies in Chapter 8, 3 and 4 that address bicycle infrastructure and services.

Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030

The Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030 was adopted unanimously by Portland’s City Council on February 11, 2010. The Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030 aims to make bicycling a critical component of our city’s overall transportation system and a significant element of our sustainable green economy. More than an update of the 1996 plan, it proposes fundamental changes to city policy, to bikeway design, to the density of our bikeway network and to an array of supporting efforts and programs. The Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030 also identifies the many benefits that will accrue to Portland as a result of its implementation.

Key principles of the Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030:

  • Attract new riders

  • Strengthen bicycle policies

  • Form a denser bikeway network

  • Increase bicycle parking

  • Expand programs to support bicycling

  • Increase funding for bicycle facilities

Bicycling creates safer streets, reduces the causes of global climate change, promotes a healthy environment, and limits the effects and health care costs related to inactivity. It provides equity and access to viable, affordable transportation options and creates fun, vibrant, and livable neighborhoods. It supports Portland’s economy and is a sound investment.

Projects identified in the Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030 have been added into the 2016 TSP list of projects.

For more information please visit https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/44597

Other Bicycle Programs and Projects

Other bicycle programs, planning efforts and improvements include:

  • BikeTOWN; Portland’s Bike Share system plus Adaptive Bikes

  • City Greenway Plan and Implementation

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  • BetterNaito

  • Protected bike lanes

  • Sunday Parkways

  • Central City MultiModal Project

  • Bikeway Missing Links

  • Tilikum Crossing (bridge)

  • Safety Programs

  • Educational Programs

Freight

Comp Plan Policies

Comp Plan policies 9.7 and 9.30 - 9.36 are freight policies. There are also freight related policies in Chapter 6: Economic Development.

Freight Master Plan

The City of Portland Freight Master Plan was adopted May 10, 2006 and provided a roadmap for managing freight movement and commercial delivery of goods and services in Portland, today and into the future. The goal is to foster a freight system that works for the community. The Freight Master Plan objectives center around three main themes: mobility, livability, and healthy economy. After 10 years, a new update of the Freight Master Plan is underway.

The Portland area has historically been a center of trade and commerce in the Pacific Northwest and, because of its connections to the interstate highway network, marine and rail terminals and an international airport, is the fourth largest freight hub for domestic and international trade on the west coast; behind the Los Angeles, Seattle and San Francisco regions.

Portland’s freight hub is characterized by its 12,500 acres of industrial land surrounding the Portland Harbor and the Portland International Airport, which accommodates most of the region’s heavy industrial activities - marine terminals, rail yards, large manufacturing and warehousing.

  • The City of Portland completed its first Transportation System Plan (TSP) in 2002. During this process, the City recognized the need to better understand freight-related issues in order to:

  • Ensure Portland’s transportation network can support the projected increased demand for freight movement.

  • Balance freight mobility needs with community impacts and other transportation modes (bicycle, pedestrian, transit, auto).

  • Take advantage of economic opportunities and changes in the global economy by capitalizing on Portland’s inherent geographic advantage and existing multimodal freight transportation system (marine, rail, air, highway, pipeline).

  • Based on the 2002 Port of Portland Commodity Flow Forecast, demand for freight tonnage into, out of, and within the Portland area will grow from 260 million tons with a total value of $352 billion in 1997 to 522 million tons with a combined value of $827 billion by 2030.

  • The volume of freight tonnage in the Portland area is projected to grow at an annual rate of 2.1%. The overall share of freight tonnage by year 2030 is projected to be: Truck (73%), Rail (11%), Ocean and Barge (10%), Pipeline (6%), and Air (<1%).

What Does the Freight Master Plan Do?

  • The Freight Master Plan is part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan - the policy guide for City growth and development - and one of the modal elements of the City’s Transportation System Plan, which elevates freight to the same level as the other modal plans (bicycle, pedestrian, motor vehicle, transportation demand management, transit) by addressing the unique characteristics, needs and impacts of freight movement.

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  • Established the Portland Freight Committee, which brought together a diverse group of members representing various multi-modal freight service providers, shippers, trade associations, and businesses involved in freight activities as well as public agency representatives from the local, state, and federal levels. The Portland Freight Committee serves as an advisory group to the Mayor, Portland City Council and the Portland Bureau of Transportation on freight related issues.

How is the Freight Master Plan Implemented? The capital projects, programs and activities identified in Freight Master Plan were developed based on three core values:

Fact Sheet: Portland Freight Master Plan

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/357102

Other Freight Planning, Projects and Programs

St John’s Transportation Concept Plan

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), in partnership with the Portland Bureau of Planning
and Sustainability, Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, Port of Portland, Metro, TriMet, and the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), has developed a set of location‐specific and programmatic recommendations to address traffic circulation, freight mobility, and pedestrian access issues identified in the St. Johns Truck Strategy. Over a period of over two years, the Portland Bureau of Transportation, with assistance from a consultant team have been developing specific project and programmatic recommendations which advance the objectives identified in the St. Johns Truck Strategy, the St. Johns Lombard Plan, the Portland Transportation Systems Plan, the Portland freight, pedestrian and bicycle master plans, and other guiding documents.

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/650491

Regional Over-Dimensional Truck Route Study

The report documents a study undertaken to better understand how over-dimensional truck freight travels in the tri-county region of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties. The study, conducted between September 2015 and December 2016, sought to identify key routes, challenges, and a range of potential solutions to improve and protect the transportation network for this small but critical user.

The study includes the following elements:

  • Evaluation of permits issued for the region

  • Inventory of existing conditions on priority over dimensional truck corridors

  • Identification of critical barriers to movement

  • Toolbox of solutions to address barriers

  • System-wide and corridor-specific recommendations for improvement

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/73902

Air, Rail, Water, Pipeline

The Airport Futures Plan was adopted in 2010. Policies from the Airport Futures are incorporated into Comp Plan Policies 9.41 - 9.44.

The River Plan and the Central City Plan have policies and recommendations related to the river and river transportation. There are river related policies in the Comp Plan Chapter 6: Economic Development and Chapter 7: Environment and Watershed Health.

Comp Plan Policy 9.28 addresses inter city passenger rail service.

TDM/Parking

Transportation Demand Management

New policies were incorporated into the Comp Plan related to TDM. Policies 9.52 - 9.54 address TDM. PBOT is working with stakeholders and bureau partners on implementation of TDM programs and administrative rules.

Other TDM Programs and Projects

  • SmartTrips

  • Zoning Code Updates

Parking

New parking policies were adopted into the comp plan in 2016. Policies 9.55 - 9.61 address motor vehicle and bicycle parking. Policy 9.56 specifically called out the curb zone as a public space and asset that has value and cost, which is a shift.

Other Parking Programs and Projects

  • Bicycle Parking Code Update (Zoning Code)

  • Parking Kitty (mobile app for parking)

  • Parking structure upgrades

  • Updated parking fee structure (on street and off street)

  • City Wide Parking Tool Kit

  • Centers Parking Strategy

  • Electric Vehicle parking policies

Transportation System Management

There are a number of policies and programs related to TSM.

Glossary

The Transportation System Plan uses clear, everyday language as much as possible. Words and terms in the Glossary have the specific meaning stated below when used in the Comprehensive Plan and TSP, unless the context clearly indicates another meaning. Words not included in this Glossary are defined by their dictionary meaning, or in some cases, by their meaning in state or federal law.

2040 Growth Concept

A concept for the long-term growth management of our region, developed by Metro. It describes the preferred form of regional growth, including where growth should be clustered, what the appropriate densities are for various land use design types, and which areas should be protected as open space. The 2040 Growth Concept was adopted as part of the Regional Urban Growth Goals and Objectives (RUGGOs) in 1995. (Source: 2000 RTP)

Access

The ability to approach or make use of transportation facilities, parks and open space, public infrastructure, or businesses and services that are open to the public. Good access means within close proximity (up to ó mile) that is free from physical barriers for those with limited mobility.

Access Management

Measures regulating access to streets, roads, and highways from public roads and private driveways. Measures may include, but are not limited to, restrictions on the siting of interchanges, restrictions on the type and amount of access to roadways, and use of physical controls (such as signals and channelization, including raised medians) to reduce impacts of approach road traffic on the main facility.

Accessibility

The ability to move easily from one mode of transportation to another mode or to a destination. Accessibility increases when the number and quality of travel choices increases. Accessibility is affected by the mix of land uses and the travel alternatives available.

Accessway

A type of right-of-way, either public or private, that is primarily to provide pedestrian and bicycle linkages consistent with connectivity needs, but may be used for vehicle access to parking or for emergency vehicles. Accessways are typically short in length and are used where full street connections are not needed and/or are not physically feasible.

Active Transportation

Transportation that involves physical activity, including walking, biking and using transit.

Activity Center

A cluster of uses that collectively generates many trips (e.g., school and park, neighborhood commercial district). An activity center can be a single use that generates many trips (e.g., stadium, large commercial outlet, large institution).

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990

Civil rights legislation enacted by Congress that mandates the development of a plan to address discrimination and equal opportunity for disabled persons in employment, transportation, public accommodation, public services, and telecommunications.

Area Permit Parking Program

A Portland Bureau of Transportation program to ensure that on-street parking associated with commercial, industrial, institutional development or large events will not spill over into adjacent residential neighborhoods. The program allows residents and firms a limited supply of permits for on-street parking and restricts on-street parking for other potential users.

Arterial

Any street that is not a Local Service Traffic Street according to the traffic classification maps in the Transportation Element of the Comprehensive Plan. Arterials include Regional Trafficways, Major City Traffic Streets, District Collectors, Neighborhood Collectors, and Traffic Access Streets.

Also: A class of street. Arterial streets interconnect and support the throughway system. Arterials are intended to provide general mobility for travel within the region. Correctly sized arterials at appropriate intervals allow through trips to remain on the arterial system thereby discouraging use of local streets for cut-through travel. Arterial streets link major commercial, residential, industrial and institutional areas. Major arterials serve longer distance through trips and serve more of a regional traffic function. Minor arterials serve shorter, more localized travel within a community. As a result, major arterials usually carry more traffic than minor arterials. Arterial streets are usually spaced about one mile apart and are designed to accommodate bicycle, pedestrian, truck and transit travel.

Attractor

A use that, by its nature, draws large numbers of people to it for special events or regular activities. Regional attractors include uses such as sports arenas and convention centers.

Auto-Oriented Development

Development that is either: 1) auto-related (such as gas stations and auto repair shops) or 2) auto-accommodating (by its design attracts primarily customers and employees arriving by automobile, such as drive-in restaurants).

Benchmark

A specific target or goal to be achieved in a specific timeframe. Benchmarks are used to determine the attainment of performance indicators and performance measures (defined below).

Bicycle

A vehicle having two tandem wheels, a minimum of 14 inches in diameter, propelled by human power, upon which a person or persons may ride. A three-wheeled adult tricycle is considered a bicycle. In Oregon, a bicycle is legally defined as a vehicle. Bicyclists have the same right to the roadways and must obey the same traffic laws as the operators of other vehicles.

Bicycle Boulevard

See Neighborhood Greenway.

Bicyclist

Person riding a bicycle.

Bike Share

Bike Share is an innovative transportation program that provides users access to bicycles on a short-term basis for one-way travel within a designated service area.

Carpool

A motor vehicle carrying two or three (depending on the context) or more people, usually commuting on a regular or semi-regular basis.

Car Sharing

An organization consisting of a group of individuals who share a fleet of cars. The purchase or lease of vehicles, fuel costs, maintenance and repair costs is borne by the organization.

Centers

Places with concentrations of commercial and community services, housing, gathering places, and transit connections. Centers provide services to surrounding neighborhoods and are intended to be enhanced as places because they are a focus of housing and job growth. There are four types of centers with varying functions, levels of activity, and scales and intensities of development:

  • Central City: Corresponds to the Central City plan district, which serves as the region’s premier center, anchoring an interconnected system of centers.

  • Gateway Regional Center: Corresponds to the Gateway plan district, East Portland’s largest center, which is intended to be enhanced as an employment and community service hub within the area and region.

  • Town Centers: Large centers that serve a broad area of the city and have an important role in accommodating growth. They provide a full range of commercial and community services, high-density housing, mid-rise commercial and mid-rise mixed-use buildings (typically up to five to seven stories in height), are served by high-capacity transit connections, and have a substantial employment component. Town Centers provide housing opportunities for enough population to support a full-service business district.

  • Neighborhood Centers: Centers that primarily serve adjacent neighborhoods and provide opportunities for additional housing and low- to mid-rise commercial and mixed-use buildings (typically up to three to five stories in height). They provide a range of local commercial and community services and transit connections. Neighborhood Centers provide housing opportunities for about half the population needed to support a neighborhood business district.

City Greenway

A system of distinctive pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly green streets and trails, enhanced by lush tree canopy and landscaped stormwater facilities that support active living by expanding transportation and recreational opportunities and making it easier and more attractive to reach destinations across the city. City Greenways are a network that includes the following types of infrastructure:

  1. Enhanced greenway corridors are distinctive green streets with extensive tree canopy and landscaped stormwater facilities that provide connections between major centers, schools, parks, natural areas, and the rivers.

  2. Trails are often located along rivers or through natural areas, providing pedestrian and bicycle connections.

  3. Heritage parkways are iconic streets or segments of streets with elements such as linear parkways, scenic views, and distinctive landscaping or street design.

  4. Neighborhood greenways are an extensive network of streets with low volumes of motor vehicle traffic that are prioritized for bicycles and enhanced for pedestrians, working in conjunction with the rest of the City Greenways system to extend the system into all neighborhoods.

Collector of Regional Significance

As designated in the 2000 Regional Transportation Plan, a route that connects the regional arterial system and the local system by collecting and distributing neighborhood traffic to arterial streets. Collectors of regional significance have three purposes: 1) They ensure adequate access to the primary and secondary land use components of the 2040 Growth Concept; 2) They allow dispersion of arterial traffic over a number of lesser facilities where an adequate local network exists; 3) They help define appropriate collector level movement between jurisdictions. (Source: 2000 RTP)

Collector Street

A class of street. Collector streets provide both access and circulation between residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural community areas and the arterial system. As such, collectors tend to carry fewer motor vehicles than arterial streets, with reduced travel speeds. Collector streets are usually spaced at half-mile intervals, midway between arterial streets. Collectors may serve as bike, pedestrian and freight access routes, providing local connections to the arterial street network and transit system. While the focus for collectors has been on motor vehicle traffic, they are developed as multi-modal facilities that accommodate bicycles, pedestrians and transit.

Complete Streets

Complete streets provide accessibility to all users of the right-of-way regardless of age, ability, or mode of transportation. They are designed and operated to make better places and to enhance safe access for all modes, including people walking and bicycling, those using a mobility device, motorists, and transit users.

Community Uses

Community uses in the right of way include but are not limited to temporary uses such as public gathering spaces, events, food production or temporary festivals, etc.

Congestion

A condition characterized by unstable traffic flows that prevents reliable movement on a transportation facility.

Connected Vehicle

A vehicle that communicates with the Internet, other vehicles, wayside systems and/or passengers.

Corridor

1. Corridors (2040 design type) – A type of land use that is typically located along regional transit routes and arterial streets, providing a place for somewhat higher densities than is found in 2040 centers. These land uses should feature a high-quality pedestrian environment and convenient access to transit. Typical new developments would include rowhouses, duplexes and one to three-story office and retail buildings, and average about 25 persons per acre. While some corridors may be continuous, narrow bands of higher-intensity development along arterial streets, others may be more nodal, that is a series of smaller centers at major intersections or other locations along the arterial that have high quality pedestrian environments, good connection to adjacent neighborhoods and transit service.

2. Corridor as defined in the Comprehensive Plan is an area that may be a single major street, or a broad mobility corridor that provides connections for a range of transportation modes (transit, pedestrians, cyclists, freight, motor vehicles, and so forth), not necessarily on the same street. There are three types of corridor:

  • Civic Corridor: These are a prioritized subset of the city’s most prominent transit and transportation streets. They connect centers, provide regional connections, and include segments where commercial development and housing are focused. Civic Corridors are intended to continue their important transportation functions while providing livable environments for people, and evolving into distinctive places that are models of ecological design.

  • Neighborhood Corridor: Main streets that connect neighborhoods with each other and to other parts of the city. They support neighborhood business districts and provide housing opportunities close to local services, amenities, and transit lines. They are streets that include a mix of commercial and higher-density housing development. They have less intense development and transportation function than Civic Corridors.

  • Freight Corridor: Primary routes into and through the city that support Portland as an important West Coast hub and a gateway for international and domestic trade. These facilities are integral to the growth of traded sector businesses such as manufacturing, warehousing, and distribution industries.

Curb Zone

The area of public right-of-way adjacent to the curb that can be used for a wide variety of mobility and access functions, including but not limited to vehicle lanes, bike lanes, curb extensions, transit platforms, street trees, loading zones, on-street parking, bike corrals, and street seats.

Early Bird Parking

Parking that is provided to encourage its use primarily by commuters. Typically, the pricing strategy is to offer a lower all-day rate if the parker arrives before a certain time in the morning.

Electric Vehicle

An electric vehicle (EV), also referred to as an electric drive vehicle, is a vehicle which uses one or more electric motors for propulsion. Depending on the type of vehicle, motion may be provided by wheels or propellers driven by rotary motors, or in the case of tracked vehicles, by linear motors.

Emergency Response Vehicles

Vehicles employed in responding to emergencies. Examples of emergency response vehicles include fire apparatus, ambulances, and police cars.

Employer Commute Options (ECO)

DEQ ECO program required employers with more than 100 employees to provide commute options to employees designed to reduce the number of cars driven to work in Portland and surrounding areas.

Environmental Impact Statement

An environmental assessment required by the National Environmental Protection Act for “any major Federal action that may significantly affect the environment.”

Faves

Fleet, fully Automated Vehicles that are Electric and Shared.

Freight

Raw and bulk materials and products that require value-adding or warehousing.

Freight Intermodal Facility

An intercity facility where freight is transferred between two or more modes (e.g., truck to rail, rail to ship, truck to air, etc.).

Frequent Service (Trimet)

Bus or MAX Light Rail transit service that runs every 15 minutes or better most of the day, every day.

Functional Plan

A limited-purpose, multijurisdictional plan for an area or activity having significant districtwide impact on the orderly and responsible development of the metropolitan area. A Functional Plan serves as a guideline for local comprehensive plans consistent with ORS 268.390.

Goals

The broadest expressions of a community’s desires. Goals give direction and are concerned with the long term; they often describe ideal situations.

Goods

Finished products, commodities, and wares ready for the final consumer.

Green Infrastructure

Public or private assets — either natural resources or engineered green facilities — that protect, support, or mimic natural systems to provide stormwater management, water quality, public health and safety, open space, and other complementary ecosystem services. Examples include trees, ecoroofs, green street facilities, wetlands, and natural waterways.

Green Street

A green street is a street with a landscaped street-side planter or bioswale that captures stormwater runoff from the street and allows it to soak into the ground as soil and vegetation filter out pollutants. A green street is not the same as a City Greenway, though a City Greenway may include green street elements.

High-capacity Transit

High-capacity transit is public transit that bypasses congestion by making full or partial use of exclusive right of way, a non-exclusive right of way, using transit priority or a combination of both. Vehicles make fewer stops, travel at higher speeds, have more frequent service, and carry more people than local service transit such as typical bus lines. High-capacity transit can be provided by a variety of vehicle types including light rail, commuter rail, streetcar, and bus.

High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV)

Any vehicle carrying two or more persons, including the driver. An HOV could be a transit bus, vanpool, carpool, or any other vehicle that meets the minimum occupancy requirements. Consistent with federal regulations, motorcycles (with or without passengers) are considered HOVs.

Historically Marginalized Communities

Communities included as part of the 2018 RTP Transportation Equity Assessment include: People of Color; People with Lower-Incomes; People with Limited English Proficiency; Older Adults; Young Persons

Home-Based Work Trip Attractions

The trips made by commuters from their homes to their places of work.

Infrastructure

Necessary municipal or public services, provided by the government or by private companies and defined as long-lived capital assets that normally are stationary and can be preserved for a significant number of years. Examples are streets, bridges, tunnels, drainage systems, water and sewer lines, parks, pump stations and treatment plants, dams, and lighting systems. Beyond transportation and utility networks, Portland includes buildings, green infrastructure, communications, and information technology as necessary infrastructure investments that serve the community. See also Public facility.

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)

The application of a broad range of commutations-based information, control and electronics technologies to improve the efficiency and safety of the transportation systems.

Local Improvement District (LID)

A method that allows a group of property owners to share the cost and benefits of public improvements.

Locally Preferred Alternative

The option selected by local jurisdiction(s) following completion of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS).

Main Street

Neighborhood shopping areas along an arterial street or at an intersection that have a unique character that draws people from outside the adjacent neighborhood.

Metro

The regional government and designated metropolitan planning organization (MPO) of the Portland region. It is governed by a seven-member elected Metro Council and is responsible for regional transportation planning activities, such as the preparation of the 2000 Regional Transportation Plan and the planning of regional transportation projects, including light rail.

Mixed-Use Areas

Compact areas of development that include a mix of uses, either within buildings or among buildings, and include residential development as one of the potential components.

Mobility Zone

The area of the right-of-way used primarily for people and/or goods movement.

Multimodal Mixed-Use Area (MMA)

The Multimodal Mixed-Use Area (MMA) is an ODOT designation applied by local governments to downtowns, town centers, main streets or other areas inside Urban Growth Boundaries where the local government determines there is: high quality connectivity to and within the area by modes of transportation other than the automobile; a denser level of development of a variety of commercial and residential uses than the surrounding areas; a desire to encourage these characteristics through development standards and an understanding that increased automobile congestion within and around the MMA is accepted as a potential trade-off.

Mobility

The ability to move people and goods from place to place, or the potential for movement. Mobility improves when the transportation network is refined or expanded to improve capacity of one or more modes, allowing people and goods to move more quickly toward a destination.

Mode Split

The percentage of trips taken by each of the possible modes of travel (motor vehicle, transit, bicycle, walk). Mode split does not refer to the number of trips. For example, the number of trips by a particular mode may increase, but the percentage of trips by that mode may stay the same or be reduced if there is also growth in the overall number of trips for other modes.

Motor Vehicle Level-of-Service (LOS)

A qualitative measure describing operational conditions within a traffic stream. A level-of-service definition generally describes these conditions in terms of such factors as speed and travel time, freedom to maneuver, traffic interruptions, comfort, convenience, and safety. LOS ratings of ‘A’ through ‘F’ describe the traffic flow characteristics on streets and highways and at intersections, as shown on the following table:

Multimodal

Having a variety of modes available for any given trip, such as being able to walk, ride a bicycle, take a bus, or drive to a certain destination. In a transportation system, multimodal means providing for many modes within a single transportation corridor.

National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQs)

Air quality standards for a variety of pollutants.

Neighborhood

For the TSP classification system, a neighborhood is an area bounded by Major City Traffic Streets, District Collectors, and/or Neighborhood Collectors.

Neighborhood Greenway

Neighborhood greenways are an extensive network of streets with low volumes of motor vehicle traffic that are prioritized for bicycles and enhanced for pedestrians, working in conjunction with the rest of the City Greenways system to extend the system into all neighborhoods.

Neighborhood Corridor

Main streets that connect neighborhoods with each other and to other parts of the city. They support neighborhood business districts and provide housing opportunities close to local services, amenities, and transit lines. They are streets that include a mix of commercial and higher-density housing development. They have less intense development and transportation function than Civic Corridors.

Objectives

These are specific statements that carry out a plan in the short term. Objectives help assess incremental progress toward achieving the broader purposes expressed in goals and policies.

Obstruction

Something that hinders from passage, action, or operation.

Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT)

State agency that oversees and maintains the State highway system, under the guidance of the Oregon Transportation Commission.

Oregon’s Statewide Planning Goals

The 19 goals that provide a foundation for the State’s land use planning program. The 19 goals can be grouped into four broad categories: land use, resource management, economic development, and citizen involvement. Locally adopted comprehensive plans and regional transportation plans must be consistent with the statewide planning goals.

Paratransit

On-demand non-fixed route service that serves special transit markets, including disabled populations unable to use regular transit service. Other examples include demand-responsive (e.g., dial-a-ride) and contracted fixed-route service.

Park-and-Ride Facility

A parking lot or structure in association with a light rail station, transit stop, or transit transfer point. Generally, park-and-rides should provide access to regional route service for areas not directly served by transit. Bicycle and pedestrian access, as well as parking and storage for bicycles, should be considered in locating new park-and-ride facilities.

Pattern Areas

Five primary geographies in Portland that have differing physical characteristics, needs, and assets. Each of these areas has unique topographies and natural features, patterns and types of development, street and other infrastructure characteristics, and histories that have shaped their urban form. The five primary Pattern Areas are:

  • Central City: This area corresponds to the Central City plan district and is also a major center.

  • Inner Neighborhoods: This area includes inner portions of the city that originally developed during the streetcar era, prior to World War II. It includes a large part of the city east of the Willamette River, extending roughly to 82nd Avenue, and also the inner westside “flats,” located between the river and the West Hills.

  • Western Neighborhoods: This area includes the West Hills (Tualatin Mountains) and areas to the west.

  • Eastern Neighborhoods: This area includes eastern portions of the city, mostly located east of 82nd Avenue and largely annexed to Portland in the 1980s and 1990s.

  • River: This area includes the land along the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and the Columbia Slough.

Peak Period

The period of the day during which the maximum amount of travel occurs. Peak periods in Portland metro area are generally defined as 7-9 AM and 4-6 PM.

Peak Period Pricing

A transportation management tool that applies market pricing principles to roadway use. Peak-period pricing imposes user surcharges or tolls on congested facilities during peak traffic periods and may allow a reduced price for high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) use.

Pedestrian

A person on foot, in a wheelchair, or in another health-related mobility device.

Performance Indicator

A term that describes a characteristic of the transportation system in order to measure progress towards a specific goal.

Performance Measure

A method used to assign a value to a performance indicator. Performance indicators measure change over time, and the performance measure is a specific activity or physical change that can be measured.

Performance Targets and Standards

A metric to demonstrate progress toward.

Policies

The choices made to carry out goals in the foreseeable futures. Policies should be specific enough to help determine whether or not a proposed project, program, or course of action will advance community values expressed in goals.

Port of Portland

A public agency that owns and maintains five marine terminals, four airports, and seven business parks in the three-county area. The Port is governed by a nine-member commission appointed by the governor.

Protected Bike Lane

Bicycle lanes that are physically separated from motor vehicle and pedestrian travel. A protected bike lane is an exclusive bicycle facility that combines the user experience of a separated path with the on-street infrastructure of a conventional bike lane. A protected bike lane is physically separated from motor traffic and distinct from the sidewalk, using vertical elements such as physical curbs or flexible delineators.

Public Facility

Any facility, including buildings, property, and capital assets, that is owned, leased, or otherwise operated, or funded by a governmental body or public entity. Examples of public facilities include sewage treatment and collection facilities, stormwater and flood management facilities, water supply and distribution facilities, streets, and other transportation assets, parks, and public buildings. See also Infrastructure.

Refinement Plans

Amendments to the Transportation System Plan. Refinement Plans resolve, at a systems level, determinations on function, mode, or general location that were deferred during the transportation system planning process because the detailed information needed to make those determinations was not available during that process. (Source: TPR)

Regional Center (Metro)

Compact, specifically defined areas where high density growth and a mix of intensive residential and commercial land uses exist or are planned. regional centers are to be supported by an efficient transit-oriented, multi-modal transportation system.

Regional Transportation Functional Plan (RTFP)

A regional functional plan regulating transportation in the Metro region, as mandated by Metro’s Regional Framework Plan. The plan directs local plan implementation of the Regional Transportation Plan.

Regional Transportation Plan (RTP)

The 20-year transportation plan developed by Metro to guide transportation in the region. The RTP is the region’s transportation system plan that is required by the Transportation Planning Rule.

Rideshare

A motor vehicle carrying two or more people for any trip purpose, including work, shopping, etc., but not on a regular schedule.

Right-of-Way (ROW)

A public area that allows for the passage of people or goods. Right-of-way includes passageways such as freeways, streets, bicycle and pedestrian off-street paths, and alleys. A public right-of-way is one that is dedicated or deeded to the public for public use and is under the control of a public agency.

Shared Residential Street

Shared residential street is a low-traffic street where all modes of travel mix within the paved roadway.

Shared Roadway Bikeway

Shared roadway bikeway is a facility type identified in the Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030, used on lower volume roadways where bicycles mix with motor vehicles.

State Implementation Plan (SIP)

State plan for achieving air quality goals to ensure compliance with the requirements of the federal Clean Air Act.

Speed Cushion

Speed cushions are either speed humps or speed tables that include wheel cutouts to allow large vehicles to pass unaffected, while reducing passenger car speeds. They can be offset to allow unimpeded passage by emergency vehicles and are typically used on key emergency response routes. Speed cushions extend across one direction of travel from the centerline, with longitudinal gap provided to allow wide wheel base vehicles to avoid going over the hump.

Traffic Calming

Roadway design strategies to reduce vehicle speeds and volumes, prevent inappropriate through traffic and reduce motor vehicle travel speeds while also aimed at improving traffic safety and neighborhood livability. Traffic calming strategies provide speed bumps, curb extensions, planted median strips or round and narrowed travel lanes.

Trails

Designated routes on land or water that provide public access for recreation or transportation purposes, like walking and bicycling. Trails are often located along rivers, through natural areas, or along rail or highway rights-of-way, with connections to and through neighborhoods.

Transit Center

A location where a number of bus and/or high-capacity transit vehicles stop. Generally, transit centers contain waiting areas, transit information, and timed transfer opportunities.

Station Community

Areas generally within a ¼ to 1/2 mile radius of a light rail station or other high capacity transit stops that are planned as multi-modal, mixed use communities with substantial pedestrian and transit supportive design characteristics and improvements.

Streetcar

Fixed guide-way transit service mixed in traffic for locally oriented trips within or between higher density mixed-use centers.

Street Tree

A tree growing within the public right-of-way between the travel lanes and the property line.

Sustainable

Methods, systems, or materials that will not deplete nonrenewable resources or harm natural cycles.

Town Center

Areas of mixed residential and commercial land uses that serve tens of thousands of people.

Transit-Oriented Development

A mix of residential, retail, office, and other uses and a supporting network of streets, bikeways, and pedestrianways oriented to a light rail station or transit service and the pedestrian network. Transit-oriented development should include high-density residential development near transit service to support the neighborhood commercial uses and have a lower demand for parking than auto-oriented land uses.

Transit station areas

Areas within a half-mile of light rail and other high-capacity transit stations. Some transit station areas are located within centers or civic corridors and are subject to policies for those types of places.

Transportation Demand Management (TDM)

Actions taken to change travel behavior in order to improve the performance of transportation facilities, reduce the need for additional road capacity, and reduce impacts on residential neighborhoods. Examples include encouraging the use of alternatives to single-occupant vehicles (SOVs), ridesharing and vanpools, parking management, and trip-reduction ordinances.

Transportation Disadvantaged

Individuals who have difficulty obtaining transportation because of their age, income, disability, or who are transit dependent for other reasons.

Transportation District

For TSP purposes, one of the eight Transportation Districts identified: Central City, North, Northeast, Far Northeast, Southeast, Far Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest.

Transportation Facilities

Any physical facility that moves or assists in the movement of people or goods, but excluding electricity, sewage, and water systems. (Source: Transportation Planning Rule)

Transportation Management Association (TMA)

Groups of businesses or institutions that develop TDM measures in order to reduce the need for commuter and visitor parking. Measures may include carpool-matching services, transit subsidies, shuttle vans, or encouraging alternatives to the automobile.

Transportation Planning Rule (TPR)

The implementing rule of Statewide Planning Goal 12 dealing with transportation, as adopted by the State Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC). Among its provisions, the TPR requires reducing vehicle miles traveled (VMT) per capita by 15 percent in the next 30 years, reducing parking spaces per capita by 10 percent in the next 20 years, and improving opportunities for alternatives to the automobile.

Transportation System Management (TSM)

Strategies and techniques for increasing the efficiency, safety, or level-of-service of a transportation facility without increasing its size. Examples include, but are not limited to, traffic signal improvements, traffic control devices (including installing medians, channelization, access management, and ramp metering), incident response, targeted traffic enforcement, preferential transit measures, and restriping for high-occupancy vehicle lanes.

Transportation System Plan (TSP)

A plan for one or more transportation facilities that are planned, developed, operated, and maintained in a coordinated manner to supply continuity of movement between modes and within and between geographical and jurisdictional areas.

TriMet

Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District, the transit agency for most of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties.

Trip

A journey made by any mode between an origin and a destination. Trips can be categorized as follows:

  • Regional trip – A trip that has neither trip origin nor destination within the Portland metro area.

  • Interregional trip – A trip that has one trip end within the Portland region and the other trip end outside the Portland region.

  • Interdistrict trip – A trip that starts in one Transportation District and ends in another\

    Transportation District.

  • Intradistrict trip – A trip that starts and ends within the same Transportation District.

  • Non-local trip --A trip that extends beyond the length of the functional purpose described in a street’s classification description.

Trip End

The origin or destination point of a journey.

Urban Growth Management Functional Plan (UGMFP)

A regional functional plan with requirements binding on cities and counties in the Metro region, as mandated by Metro’s Regional Framework Plan. The plan addresses accommodation of projected regional population and job growth, regional parking management, water quality conservation, and limits on retail uses in employment and industrial areas.

Volume-to-capacity (v/c) Ratio

A measure of potential roadway capacity. A ratio expressing the relationship between the existing or anticipated volume of traffic on a roadway and the designed capacity of the facility.

Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) per Capita

Miles driven in automobiles per person on average. The Transportation Planning Rule requires a 10 percent reduction of VMT per capita within 20 years of adoption of a Transportation System Plan, and an additional 5 percent reduction within 30 years of adoption of the TSP. The VMT per capita reductions mean that individuals will, on average, travel less by automobile than previously but, because the population will continue to grow, it does not mean an overall reduction in the amount of miles driven.

Projects:

TSP ID Lead Agency Facility Owner Project Name Project Location Project Description Estimated Cost Financially Constrained? Estimated Timeframe
10005 Portland Portland Pedestrian Network Completion Program Citywide Gaps and deficiencies in Portland's pedestrian network present significant barriers to pedestrians. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe walking as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the pedestrian network is improved. Example projects include sidewalk gap infill, sidewalk improvements, safer shoulders, shared streets, pathways, trails, crossing improvements, wayfinding improvements, accessibility improvements, and signal modifications. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Pedestrian Districts. $60,200,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10006 Portland Portland Bikeway Network Completion Program Citywide Gaps and deficiencies in Portland's bikeway network present significant barriers to bicyclists. Many of these can be remedied through modest expenditures to address the most critically needed improvements. These projects should contribute to an increase in safe bicycling as disincentives to usage are eliminated and the continuity of the bikeway network is improved. Example projects include new bike lanes and sharrows, improvements to existing bikeways, wayfinding improvements, colored bike boxes and lanes, and signal modifications. This program will coordinate with paving projects to ensure that new striping designs are developed ahead of time and implemented in conjunction with paving. The program will also work to identify and implement needed improvements in designated Bicycle Districts. $24,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10007 Portland Portland Neighborhood Greenways Program Citywide The Neighborhood Greenway system provides a network of safe and comfortable pedestrian/bicycle priority routes on low-volume, low-speed streets. The Neighborhood Greenway network will be improved and expanded over time through inexpensive treatments that lower speeds, reduce automobile volumes, create safer crossings of busy streets, and provide wayfinding. Example project elements include speed bumps, sharrows, signage, diverters, curb ramps, lighting, and improved crossings. $19,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10008 Portland Portland High Crash Corridor Program Citywide High Crash Corridors are streets in Portland with a high concentration of crashes. The High Crash Corridor program uses relatively inexpensive education, enforcement and engineering solutions to address crash problems in a short period of time. Example projects include improved crossings, lane reorganizations, curb extensions, median islands, speed reader boards, and speed/crosswalk enforcement. $67,100,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10009 Portland Portland Safe Routes to School Program Citywide Portland Safe Routes to School is a partnership of the City of Portland, schools, neighborhoods, community organizations and agencies that advocates for and implements programs that make walking and biking around our neighborhoods and schools fun, easy, safe and healthy for all students and families while reducing our reliance on cars. The Portland Safe Routes to School program currently provides Education, Encouragement, Engineering, Enforcement, and Evaluation in an Equitable manner (6 ‘E's) to support students in schools to be safe, have fun, grow healthy and get there. $71,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10010 Portland Portland Transit Priority Program Citywide Improve transit speed, reliability, safety, and access along major transit corridors. Example projects include sidewalk infill, crossing improvements, stop improvements, stop consolidation or relocation, signal priority, queue jumps, and transit-only lanes. The program will coordinate with TriMet and other transit agencies to identify and implement these improvements. $9,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10011 Portland Portland Freight Priority Program Citywide Improve freight speed, reliability, safety, and access along major freight routes. Example projects include signal priority, freight-only lanes, queue jumps, loading zones, and turning radius improvements. The program will coordinate with the Port of Portland and other freight-related organizations to identify and implement these improvements. $9,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10012 Portland Portland Transportation System Management Program Citywide Transportation System Management (TSM) seeks to identify improvements to enhance the capacity of existing system through operational improvements.  Through better management and operation of existing transportation facilities, these techniques are designed to improve traffic flow, air quality, and movement of vehicles and goods, as well as enhance system accessibility and safety. Example projects include corridor signal timing, electronic message boards, variable speed limits, traveler information services, traffic cameras, bluetooth readers, and other intelligent transportation system (ITS) elements. $9,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10013 Portland Portland Transportation & Parking Demand Management Program Citywide Transportation & Parking Demand Management (TDM) seeks to better utilize existing capacity in the transportation system and parking supply by reducing single-occupant automobile trips through demand management strategies. This is achieved by encouraging people through education, outreach, incentives and pricing to choose other modes, share rides, travel outside peak times, and telecommute, among other methods. TDM program elements include SmartTrips outreach, TDM Plan requirements for new development, and parking management planning and implementation. TDM is often implemented in partnerships with community organizations, neighborhood and business assocations, developers and property managers. $19,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
10014 Portland Portland Alternative Street Design Program Citywide Many streets in the City of Portland do not meet full City standards. Unimproved and substandard streets cause safety, access and mobility issues for all users and fail to manage stormwater runoff. The Alternative Street Design Program will plan and implement lower-cost alternative design treatments that enhance safety, access, and mobility when funds are lacking for more extensive upgrades. Ideally, these design treatments would be concurrent with stormwater improvements. Example projects include “shared street” improvements to gravel streets, new connections through undeveloped rights-of-way, and improvements to substandard paved streets.  The program could be funded by a combination of Local Improvement Districts, development impact fees, local transportation funds (e.g. Our Streets), Bureau of Environmental Services (BES) stormwater funds, and other grant and community investment opportunities. $20,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 20
20002 Portland Portland / ODOT I-405 Corridor ITS 14th/16th, NW (Glisan - Burnside); 13th/14th, SW (Burnside - Clay) ITS improvements at six signals between Clay and Glisan including communications infrastructure; closed circuit TV cameras, variable message signs for remote monitoring and control of traffic flow. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20005 Portland Portland Fields Park Pedestrian / Bicycle Bridge 10th, NW (Overton - Naito Parkway) Construct a pedestrian/bicycle bridge over the railroad tracks. $2,300,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20007 Portland Portland / ODOT South Portal Intersection Improvements Bancroft / Hood / Macadam, SW Improve the South Portal to the North Macadam District (intersection of Bancroft, Hood, and Macadam) to address safety and capacity issues. $8,138,078 Yes Years 1 - 10
20010 Multnomah County Multnomah County Broadway Bridge Rehabilitation Broadway Bridge Rehabilitate mechanical system, approach structure, corrosion control, phase 1 seismic. $22,700,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20011 Multnomah County Multnomah County Burnside Bridge Rehabilitation, Phase 1 Burnside Bridge Rehabilitate mechanical system, approach structure, corrosion control, phase 1 seismic. $25,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20012 Portland / Multnomah County Portland / Multnomah County Burnside Bridge Access Improvements Burnside Bridge, E/W Construct a stairway and elevator to provide access from the Burnside Bridge to Waterfront Park. Construct an elevator alongside existing staircase to provide an accessible connection between the Eastbank Esplanade and the Burnside Bridge. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20014 Portland Portland W Burnside Corridor Improvements Burnside St, W (NW 15th to NW 23rd) Design and construct boulevard improvements including pavement reconstruction, wider sidewalks, curb extensions, safer crossings, new traffic signals, and traffic management. $4,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20016 Portland Portland / ODOT Central City TSM Central City Implement Central City TSM improvements to arterials. $3,250,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20040 Portland Portland South Waterfront Street Connections Multiple Streets, SW (River Parkway - Moody) New streets will be constructed in phases according to the South Waterfront District Street Plan as development occurs. $5,250,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20049 Portland Portland North Portal Street Improvements Sheridan St, SW (Water - Bond); Water / Corbett Ave, SW (Sheridan - Kelly) Improve access into the northern end of the North Macadam District by improving SW Corbett and SW Sheridan Street, including their connections with SW Kelly Way, SW Harbor Drive, and SW River Parkway. $9,250,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20050 Portland Portland / ODOT Southern Triangle Access Improvements Powell Blvd, SE (8th - 17th) Improve traffic access to the Southern Triangle district from eastbound Powell Blvd. $4,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20057 Portland Portland Willamette Greenway Trail Extension Willamette Greenway Trail, SW (Marquam Br - Hamilton) Provide two paths in order to separate bicyclists from pedestrians in remaining gaps of South Waterfront's Willamette Greenway trail. $2,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20063 Portland Portland Central Eastside Belmont/Morrison Bikeway Belmont/Morrison St, SE (Water - 12th) Design and implement an east-west bikeway along the Belmont/Morrison corridor from Water to 12th. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20065.1 Portland Portland Interstate Semi-viaduct Replacement Interstate Ave, N (North of Broadway Bridge) Replace the existing weight-restricted, poor-condition Interstate Semi-viaduct (Bridge #152). Provide enhanced bicycle facilities on new structure if feasible. $2,150,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20065.2 Portland Portland Interstate-Larrabee Overpass Interstate-Larrabee Ramp, N (Tillamook - Broadway) Remove the existing weight-restricted, low-clearance, poor-condition Interstate to Larrabee southbound flyover ramp (Bridge #153) and replace with a new overpass including a multi-use path to connect the future N Portland Greenway Trail to the Broadway Bridge. Assess the costs and benefits of providing vehicle access on the new structure as part of project development. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20068 Portland Portland NE 12th Ave Bridge Replacement 12th Ave, NE (over I-84 and railroad tracks) Replace the existing fracture critical and seismically deficient 12th Ave bridge (Bridge #025) over I-84 and railroad tracks with a new structure. Provide multimodal transportation improvements on the new structure. $13,236,245 No N/A
20069 Portland Railroad NW Marshall Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge Marshall, NW (9th - Naito Parkway) Construct a pedestrian/bicycle bridge over the railroad tracks, potentially connecting to Broadway Bridge. $3,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20070 Portland Portland NW Naito/Front Safety Improvements Naito Pkwy / Front Ave, NW (9th - 21st) Construct multimodal safety and capacity improvements including a lane reconfiguration, pedestrian improvements, and bicycle facilities. $2,600,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20073 Portland Portland Stark / Washington Safety and Access Improvements Stark / Washington, SE (Water - Sandy) Improve freight and bicycle connectivity and mobility by reconfiguring traffic flow and turning movements on Stark and Washington Streets between Water and Sandy. Requires signals and/or crossings at Grand and MLK (see project 20205). Consider protected intersections at Sandy & Washington and Sandy & Stark during project design. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20075 Portland Portland Water Ave Corridor Improvements Water Ave, SE (Stark - Clay) Remove rails from roadway, repair pavement, build sidewalks, and enhance existing bikeway. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20077 Portland Portland Sullivan's Crossing Pedestrian/Bicycle Bridge 7th Ave, NE (over I-84) Construct a pedestrian/bicycle bridge across Interstate 84 connecting the Lloyd District to the Central Eastside Industrial District. Supports future Green Loop project. $12,548,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20078 Portland Portland Lloyd District Streetscape Improvements 7th/9th Ave, NE (Broadway - Lloyd Blvd) Construct sidewalk improvements, mid-block crossings, and other enhancements to create a more pedestrian-oriented streetscape. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20079 Portland Portland Sullivan’s Gulch Trail: Lloyd Blvd. Alignment Lloyd Blvd, NE (Easbank Esplanade - 12th) Design and construct a multi-use path or two-way protected bikeway on the south side of Lloyd Blvd, connecting to Sullivan's Crossing ped/bike bridge and future Sullivan's Gulch Trail. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20089 Portland Portland W Burnside/Couch Corridor Improvements, Phase 1 Burnside/Couch, W/NW (Burnside Bridge - NW 15th) Construct transportation improvements including pavement reconstruction, traffic signals, turn lanes, curb extensions, bicycle network improvements, and crossing improvements. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20091 Portland Portland W Burnside/Couch Corridor Improvements, Phase 2 Burnside/Couch, W/NW (Burnside Bridge - NW 15th) Implements a one-couplet design including new traffic signals, widened sidewalks, curb extensions, bike lanes, on-street parking and street trees. This project will be coordinated with ODOT to address potential impacts to the I-405 interchanges, overcrossings and ramps. $70,000,000 No N/A
20097 Portland Portland Flanders Crossing and Neighborhood Greenway Flanders St, NW (24th - Steel Bridge) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway from the Steel Bridge to NW 24th, including a pedestrian/bicycle bridge over I-405, signal at 16th, signal at Broadway, improved crossing at Naito, and other crossing and traffic calming improvements as needed. $8,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20102.1 Portland Portland Bond Ave Extension, Phase 1 Bond Ave, SW (River Parkway -Porter) Extend SW Bond one-way northbound from Porter to River Parkway. $9,569,600 Yes Years 1 - 10
20102.2 Portland Portland Bond Ave Extension, Phase 2 Bond Ave, SW (Porter - Whitaker) Extend SW Bond one-way northbound from SW Whitaker to Porter, extend Portland Streetcar service north of the Tram, and convert Moody to one-way southbound operation to form a couplet. $16,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20105 Portland Portland NW 14th Ave Bikeway and Crossing Improvements 14th Ave, NW (Burnside - Thurman) Construct improved crossings at neighborhood greenway crossings of NW 14th Ave. Enhance existing bikeway at major intersections and explore feasibility of providing a southbound bikeway on 14th or a parallel street. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20107 Portland Portland SW 4th Ave Corridor Improvements 4th Ave, SW (Sheridan - Madison) Improves the street environment on SW 4th Avenue adjacent to Portland State University by adding bicycle facilities, curb bulb-outs, enhanced pedestrian crossings, traffic signals, and green street features. As part of the project, reconfigure 4th Ave from Sheridan to Lincoln to enhance and extend the bike lane over I-405, and modify the signal at Lincoln to improve bicycle access. $2,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20108 Portland Portland SW Broadway Bikeway and Streetscape Improvements Broadway, SW (Clay - Sherman) Enhances the existing protected bikeway and sidewalks on SW Broadway adjacent to Portland State University. Includes the construction of a raised bikeway, sidewalk amenities, green street features, ADA improvements, pedestrian islands, curb bulb-outs, and a full signal at Harrison. Enhance the existing bikeway on SW Broadway from Jackson to Sherman across I-405 to improve safety and comfort. $1,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20109 Portland Portland Moody Ave Extension Moody Ave, SW (Bancroft - Hamilton Ct) Extend SW Moody Ave from Bancroft to Hamilton Ct to improve circulation within the South Waterfront neighborhood. $34,168,374 No N/A
20110 Portland Railroad / ODOT Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 1 Banfield Corridor, NE (Eastbank Esplanade - 21st) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles within the Banfield (I-84) Corridor from the Eastbank Esplanade to NE 21st Ave. $40,000,000 No N/A
20112 Portland Portland NE Multnomah Protected Bikeway Improvements Multnomah St, NE (Interstate - 16th) Construct permanent improvements to the NE Multnomah St protected bikeway. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20113 Portland Portland NE Broadway Corridor Improvements, Phase 1 Broadway/Weidler, N/NE (Broadway Bridge - 24th) Enhance existing bike lanes and improve pedestrian/bicycle crossings. Add traffic signals, improve signal timing, improve transit stops, and construct streetscape improvements. $9,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20116 Portland Portland / ODOT I-405 Safety and Operational Improvements 15th/16th/Burnside/Couch, NW (at I-405 interchange) Improve pedestrian and bike access from NW Portland to Central City across I-405 at Burnside and Couch. Improves traffic operations for I-405 off-ramp. $2,240,094 Yes Years 1 - 10
20117 Multnomah County Multnomah County Morrison Bridge Rehabilitation Morrison Bridge Rehabilitate mechanical system, approach structure, corrosion control, phase 1 seismic. $45,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20118 Multnomah County Multnomah County Hawthorne Bridge Rehabilitation Hawthorne Bridge Rehabilitate mechanical system, approach structure, corrosion control, phase 1 seismic. $13,300,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20119 ODOT ODOT Broadway/Weidler Interchange, Planning and PE Interstate 5, N/NE (I-405 - I-84) Conduct planning, preliminary engineering and environmental work to improve safety and operations on I-5, connection between I-84 and I-5, and access to the Lloyd District and Rose Quarter. $44,400,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20120 ODOT ODOT Broadway/Weidler Interchange, Right-of-Way Interstate 5, N/NE (I-405 - I-84) Acquire right-of-way to improve safety and operations on I-5, connection between I-84 and I-5, and access to the Lloyd District and Rose Quarter. $40,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20121 ODOT ODOT Broadway/Weidler Interchange, Construction Interstate 5, N/NE (I-405 - I-84) Construct improvements to enhance safety and operations on I-5, connection between I-84 and I-5, and access to the Lloyd District and Rose Quarter. Project includes a pedestrian/bicycle bridge across I-5 at Clackamas St. $127,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20122 Portland Portland NE 9th Ave Bikeway 9th Ave, NE (Lloyd - Broadway) Design and implement separated bicycle facilities from Lloyd Blvd to Broadway. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20123 Portland / ODOT Portland / ODOT SW Broadway Traffic Improvements Broadway, SW (Grant - 5th) Make improvements on SW Broadway and/or other city streets to reduce the vehicle queue on the I-405 SB Exit Ramp that connects to SW Broadway. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20124 Portland / ODOT Portland / ODOT I-405 / Glisan Traffic Improvements I-405 / Glisan, NW (southbound off-ramp) Make improvements on city streets near the I-405 SB Exit Ramp to reduce the queue on the exit ramp. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20125 Portland Portland Portland Streetcar Operational Improvements Central City Design and implement projects to improve the operational efficiency of Portland Streetcar. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20126 Portland Portland 1st / 2nd / 3rd Ave Bikeway 1st / 2nd / 3rd Ave, SW (Arthur - Flanders) Design and implement bikeways on 1st / 2nd / 3rd from Arthur to Flanders to create a safe and comfortable north-south bicycle connection through the Central City. Project includes a traffic signal at SW 2nd & Clay. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20127 Portland Portland Naito Parkway Corridor Improvements Naito Pkwy, NW/SW (Steel Bridge - Harrison) Improve roadway and provide separated pedestrian and bicycle facilities along the eastside of Naito Parkway. Add or upgrade crossings at Montgomery, Clay, Jefferson, Main, Davis, and Everett. Improve pedestrian and bicycle access across Naito, including detection and signal timing adjustments where appropriate. Signalize the top of the ramp from Naito to Hawthorne Bridge to improve traffic flow. $10,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20128 Portland Portland Broadway Multimodal Streetscape Improvements Broadway, NW/SW (Hoyt - Clay) Enhance the existing bikeway on Broadway. Includes the construction of a protected bikeway, signal improvements, short-term parking and loading zones, and shorter pedestrian crossings. Consider a protected intersection at Broadway/Burnside and a northbound bicycle facility from Oak to Hoyt during project design. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20129 Portland Portland South Park Blocks Bikeway 9th / Park Ave, SW (Clifton - Oak) Design and implement a bikeway, with traffic calming and improved crossings as needed. Supports future Green Loop project. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20130 Portland Portland SW 12th Ave Bikeway 12th Ave, SW (Montgomery - Stark) Design and implement a bikeway on 12th Ave to provide a safe and comfortable northbound bicycle connection through the Central City. $750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20131 Portland Portland Jefferson / Columbia Bikeway Jefferson / Columbia St, SW (Naito - 18th) Design and implement a bikeway on SW Columbia St and enhance existing bikeway on SW Jefferson St to create a safe and comfortable east-west bicycle connection through the Central City. $1,250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20132 Portland Portland Salmon / Taylor Bikeway Salmon / Taylor, SW (Naito - 16th) Design and implement bikeways on Salmon and Taylor Streets to create a safe and comfortable east-west bicycle connection through the Central City. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20133 Portland Portland SW Main / Madison Bikeway and Transit Improvements Main / Madison St, SW (1st - 5th) Enhance and extend bikeways on Main and Madison to create a safe and comfortable east-west bicycle connection in the Central City. Reconfigure roadway to add a bus-only lane on SW Madison from 5th to 1st, with right turns allowed where necessary. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20135 Portland Portland / MultCo Hawthorne Bridgehead Pedestrian Improvements Hawthorne Bridgehead, SW Add improved crossings at Naito/Jefferson and Naito/Main. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20136 Portland Portland / MultCo Morrison Bridgehead Pedestrian Improvements Morrison Bridgehead, SW Add missing crosswalks at 2nd & Alder and 2nd & Washington to improve pedestrian safety and connectivity. Convert dual left-turn lanes to single left-turn lanes at 3rd & Washington and 4th & Alder to improve pedestrian crossing safety. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20138 Portland Portland Burnside / 10th Pedestrian Improvements Burnside / 10th, SW Convert the "jughandle" left turn lane at Burnside & 10th into public space. Improve pedestrian safety at the intersection. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20139 Portland Portland Burnside / Broadway Pedestrian Improvements Burnside / Ankeny / Broadway, SW Reconfigure the section of Broadway between Burnside, Pine, and Ankeny to improve pedestrian safety and provide public space. Consider closing Ankeny to vehicle traffic. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20140 Portland Portland Burnside / 20th Pedestrian Improvements Burnside / 20th Place, SW Convert the slip lane at Burnside & 20th Pl into public space. Improve pedestrian safety at the intersection. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20141 Portland Portland Collins Circle Public Space Improvements Jefferson / Columbia / 18th, SW Improve Collins Circle to make the public space more accessible and engaging for the community. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20142 Portland Portland Firefighters Park Public Space Improvements 18th / 19th / Alder, SW Improve Firefighters Park to make the public space more accessible and engaging for the community. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20143 TriMet TriMet Goose Hollow Bike Hub Goose Hollow/SW Jefferson MAX Station Establish a west-side commuter bike hub at the Goose Hollow/SW Jefferson MAX station, accommodating the needs of transit riders transferring to or from bicycles at this location. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20144 Portland Portland Goose Hollow Ped/Bike Connectivity Improvements Goose Hollow Improve bicycle and pedestrian connectivity throughout Goose Hollow, including connections on SW 16th Ave through the Lincoln High School site. $500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20146 Portland Portland NW 18th/19th/Alder Bikeway 18th / 19th Ave, NW (Alder - Glisan); Alder St, SW (14th - 18th); Alder / Washington, SW (14th - Broadway) Design and implement separated bike lanes to extend the 18th/19th Bikeway and connect to Alder. Provide bike lanes in both directions along Alder from 18th to 14th, and add bike lanes on the Alder/Washington couplet from 14th to Broadway. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20147 Portland Portland SW Jefferson Main Street Improvements Jefferson St, SW (14th - 20th) Construct streetscape improvements to enhance SW Jefferson as a Main Street for the Goose Hollow neighborhood. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20148 Portland ODOT SW Salmon/Taylor Pedestrian Improvements Salmon / Taylor / I-405, SW Pedestrian improvements at the SW Salmon / I-405 off-ramp area and SW Taylor / I-405 on-ramp area, including adding pedestrian facilities on the south side of the Salmon and Taylor overpasses between 13th and 14th Avenues. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20149 Portland Portland Vista Bridge Renovation Vista Bridge, SW Renovate the structurally deficient Vista Bridge (Bridge #036). $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20151 Portland Portland / MultCo Inner Burnside Multimodal Improvements Burnside St, W/E (SW Park - SE 12th) Reconfigure lanes from SW Park Ave to SE 12th Ave to reduce transit delay and improve pedestrian and bicycle safety. Enhance existing bike lanes across the bridge to provide climbing lanes and more physical separation from traffic. Extend bike lanes west to SW 4th Ave and improve pedestrian crossing at SW 2nd Ave. Project may include signal modifications to improve transit operations and pedestrian safety. Explore feasibility of eastbound bus-only lane as part of project design. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20152 Portland Portland SW Ankeny Pedestrian Street Improvements Ankeny St, SW (Naito - Park) Develop SW Ankeny as a pedestrian-oriented street, including some pedestrian-only segments providing public space and outdoor seating. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20153 Portland Portland North Park Blocks Bikeway 8th / Park Ave, NW/SW (Oak - Glisan) Design and implement a bikeway, with traffic calming, signals, and improved crossings as needed. Supports future Green Loop project. $750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20154 Portland Portland NW 9th Ave Bikeway 9th Ave, NW (Hoyt - Naito) Design and implement a separated bikeway to provide a safe and comfortable bicycle connection from the Pearl District to Naito Parkway. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20155 Portland Portland NW 12th Ave Bikeway 12th Ave, NW (Burnside - Pettygrove); 13th Ave, NW (Burnside - Davis) Design and implement a bikeway, with traffic calming, signals, and improved crossings as needed. $750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20156 Portland Portland NW 15th Ave Walkway / Bikeway 15th Ave, NW (Johnson - Savier) Restripe NW 15th Ave to provide a striped pedestrian walkway on the west side of the street and bicycle sharrows in the travel lanes. Remove abandoned railroad tracks from the roadway as part of the project. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20158 Portland Railroad NW 13th Ave Ped/Bike Bridge 13th Ave, NW (Raleigh - Naito) Construct a pedestrian and bicycle bridge over the railroad tracks to connect the North Pearl District to Naito and the waterfront. $2,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20159 Portland Portland NW Davis St Neighborhood Greenway Davis St, NW (Naito - 13th) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway, with traffic calming, signals, and improved crossings as needed. $250,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20160 Portland Portland North Park Blocks Festival Streets Davis St, NW (Park - 8th); Flanders St, NW (Park - 8th) Redesign streets crossing the Park Blocks with special designs and traffic calming to enhance the pedestrian environment and complement the function of the park. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20162 Portland Portland NW Hoyt St Bikeway Hoyt St, NW (9th - Broadway) Redesign NW Hoyt Street to provide bike lanes in both directions. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20165 Portland Portland NW Northrup Traffic Signals Pearl District, NW Construct new traffic signals at Northrup & 11th, Northrup & 12th, Northrup & 13th, Northrup & 14th, Northrup & 15th, and Northrup & 16th to improve traffic flow and streetcar operations. $1,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20166 Portland Portland Harrison / Montgomery Bikeway Harrison St, SW (Naito - 11th); Montgomery St, SW (11th - 14th) Design and implement bikeways along SW Harrison St from Naito to 4th to complete the bicycle connection between the Tilikum Bridge and PSU. Improve pedestrian crossings of Harrison from Naito to 4th. Continue bikeway through PSU campus along Harrison and Montgomery. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20167 Portland Portland SW 6th & Jackson Crossing Improvement 6th & Jackson, SW Enhance safety at existing pedestrian crossing. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20168 Portland ODOT / TriMet SW 6th Ave & I-405 Multimodal Improvements Broadway, SW (4th - 6th); 6th Ave, SW (Broadway - Jackson); Jackson St, SW (6th - Park) Restripe SW Broadway to direct two lanes of traffic onto the freeway on-ramp. Reconfigure intersection of SW 6th, Jackson, and freeway off-ramp to provide a signalized pedestrian crossing and allow westbound buses on Jackson to access 6th Ave northbound. Extend sidewalk and build a bus platform on east side of 6th Ave south of Jackson. Enhance and extend the bike lane on 6th north to Jackson and south to Broadway. Design and implement a bikeway on Jackson St from 6th to Park. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20169 Portland Portland 1st Ave / I-405 Crossing Improvements 1st Ave / I-405, SW Add improved pedestrian crossings of 1st Ave on either side of I-405. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20170 Portland Portland SW Naito Pkwy Multi-use Path Naito Pkwy, SW (I-405 - Lincoln) Extend multi-use path on east side of Naito from Lincoln to I-405, with a connection to Caruthers and/or Grant to allow southbound bicycle access to Gibbs Street Bridge and Tilikum Crossing. $500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20171 Portland Portland SW 15th/16th Ave Bikeway 15th/16th Ave, SW (Burnside - Salmon) Design and implement a bikeway couplet, with traffic calming and crossing improvements as needed. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20172 Portland ODOT Upper I-405 Trail I-405 (Water - 4th) Design and implement a pedestrian and bicycle connection along the I-405 off-ramp to 4th & Lincoln. Supports future Green Loop project. $2,800,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20173 Portland Portland SE 9th Ave Crossing Improvements 9th Ave, SE (at Hawthorne, Madison, Belmont, Morrison, Stark, Sandy) Provide enhanced pedestrian crossings at major intersections to improve safety and reduce pedestrian delay. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20174 Portland Portland SE Salmon Neighborhood Greenway Improvements Salmon St, SE (Eastbank Esplanade - 12th) Improve existing neighborhood greenway by installing improved crossings at 7th, 11th, and 12th. Once traffic signals are constructed at MLK/Grand (see project 20073), extend the Salmon neighborhood greenway from 7th to the Eastbank Esplanade. $400,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20175 Portland Portland SE Ankeny Neighborhood Greenway Improvements Ankeny St, SE (3rd - 12th); 3rd Ave, SE/NE (Ankeny - Couch) Once traffic signals are constructed at MLK and 11th/Sandy (see project 20073), extend the Ankeny neighborhood greenway to 3rd Ave, along 3rd north to Couch Ct, and connecting to the Burnside Bridge. $100,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20176 Portland Portland 11th/12th Ave Multimodal Safety Improvements 11th/12th Ave, SE (Burnside - Clinton) Enhance pedestrian and bicycle safety and access by installing improved crossings at Ankeny, Salmon, Madison, Clay, and Harrison. Design and implement improvements to enhance bicycle travel on 11th and 12th. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20177 Portland Portland SE Harrison Neighborhood Greenway Harrison St, SE (7th - Ladd Circle) Extend the Harrison Neighborhood Greenway from Ladd Circle to 7th, including traffic calming and improved crossings at 7th, 11th, and 12th. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20181 Portland MultCo Inner Hawthorne Multimodal Corridor Improvements Hawthorne Blvd, SW/SE (SW Naito - SE 12th) Signalize the top of the ramp from SW Naito to Hawthorne Bridge to improve safety and capacity for all modes. Construct an eastbound protected bikeway with transit islands to improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and comfort as well as transit operational efficiency. Explore feasibility of eastbound bus-only lane as part of project design. $2,600,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20184 Portland Portland SE Yamhill / Taylor Couplet Yamhill / Taylor, SE (Water - Grand) Improve traffic safety and capacity by converting Yamhill and Taylor to couplet operation between Water and Grand Ave, including new traffic signals at Yamhill / MLK, Yamhill / Grand, and Taylor / Water. As part of the project, reconfigure the ramp from Belmont viaduct to MLK. $3,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20185 Portland TriMet Gideon Street Pedestrian / Bicycle Bridge Clinton MAX Station Construct a pedestrian / bicycle bridge over the railroad and light rail tracks to connect the Clinton MAX Station with the adjacent neighborhood. $10,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20186 Portland Portland NE 7th Ave Bikeway Improvements 7th Ave, NE (Lloyd - Broadway) Enhance the existing bikeway on 7th from Lloyd to Broadway to improve safety and comfort, including protected bikeway elements where needed, separation from traffic, and crossing improvements. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20187 Portland / ODOT Portland / ODOT Yamhill & Water Traffic Improvements Yamhill / Water, SE Install signal at the SE Yamhill St / SE Water Ave intersection with turn lane and queue detection treatments on the I-5 NB Exit Ramp to reduce queue length and/or provide advanced warning sign of queue on the exit ramp. $750,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20188 Portland Portland Lloyd District Grand / MLK Traffic Signals Grand / MLK, NE (Lloyd - Broadway) Improve multimodal safety and traffic flow by constructing additional traffic signals at intersections along Grand and MLK. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20189 Portland Portland Oregon / Grand Streetcar Turnaround Oregon / Grand, NE Construct a streetcar turnaround to enable east-west streetcar service between NW 23rd and the Lloyd District. $750,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20190 Portland Portland Grand / Weidler Streetcar Turnaround Grand / Weidler, NE Construct a streetcar turnaround to enable standalone north-south streetcar service on the Eastside. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20191 Portland ODOT Freeway Underpass Improvements Lloyd Blvd / Multnomah St / Holladay St / Oregon St / Russell St, N/NE (under I-5) Enhance the pedestrian and bicycling environment under the I-5 freeway at Lloyd Blvd, Multnomah, Holladay, Oregon, and Russell. Improve the appearance of publicly owned storage yeards located under and adjacent to the I-5 and I-405 freeways. $100,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20192 Portland Portland N River St Reconstruction River St, N (Tillamook - Essex) Rebuild N River Street from the Tillamook overpass to Essex Street. $750,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20193.1 Portland Portland Post Office Blocks Transportation Improvements, Phase 1 Johnson St, NW (9th - Station Way); Park Ave, NW (Hoyt - Johnson); 9th & Everett; 9th & Glisan Extend Johnson St as an east-west multimodal street through the Post Office Blocks redevelopment site, including diverter at 9th Ave. Extend Park Ave north to Johnson. Add traffic signals at 9th/Everett and 9th/Glisan. Create pedestrian connections throughout the site. $16,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20193.2 Portland Portland Post Office Blocks Transportation Improvements, Phase 2 NW 9th to Broadway; NW Lovejoy to Hoyt Extend the Green Loop through the Broadway Corridor redevelopment site from North Park Blocks to Broadway Bridge. Enhance existing bike lanes along Broadway and Lovejoy viaducts. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20194 Portland Portland Central Eastside 7th Ave Corridor Improvements 7th Ave, SE (Flanders - Division) Design and implement a bikeway from I-84 to Division, connecting to Sullivan's Crossing ped/bike bridge, with separated bikeway segments, neighborhood greenway segments, pedestrian improvements, and crossing improvements as needed. Includes enhancement of existing bicycle facilities on 7th Ave from Sandy to Division Consider a protected intersection design at 7th/Washington/Sandy. Supports future Green Loop Project. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20196 Portland Portland Grand & I-84 Transit Improvements Grand Ave, NE (Burnside - Lloyd) Adjust streetcar track alignment, reconfigure lanes, and modify signals to reduce bus and streetcar delay due to freeway on-ramp queue. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20197 Portland Railroad / ODOT Steel Bridge Transit Improvements Steel Bridge Design and implement transit priority improvements to reduce transit delay on the Steel Bridge and its approaches. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20198 TriMet / Portland TriMet / Portland Rose Quarter Transit Center Redesign Rose Quarter Transit Center Redesign the Rose Quarter Transit Center and Steel Bridge to improve transit system capacity and operations, improve customer experience and ease transfers, minimize conflicts with other modes and provide areas for community spaces, enhanced facilities for pedestrians and cyclists and redevelopment. $300,000,000 No N/A
20199 TriMet Portland SW 1st Ave Light Rail Turnaround Morrison St & 1st Ave, SW Develop a turnaround to allow eastbound light rail trains to turn westbound to improve transit operations. $10,000,000 No N/A
20200 Portland Portland SW/NW 4th Ave Bikeway 4th Ave, SW/NW (Madison - Flanders) Design and implement a protected bikeway on 4th Ave to provide a bikeway couplet with Broadway connecting PSU, Downtown, and Old Town / Chinatown. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20201 Portland Portland Central Eastside Sandy Blvd Corridor Improvements Sandy Blvd, SE (Washington - Burnside) Enhance existing bicycle facilities to improve safety and comfort. Modify intersections to improve pedestrian crossing safety. Consider a protected intersection design at 7th/Washington/Sandy and Stark/Sandy. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20202 Portland Portland Bicycle / Rail Safety Improvements Central City Install pavement markings and signage on rail streets where needed to improve bicycle safety and comfort. $250,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20203 Portland Portland Union Station, Phase 3 Union Station Core building improvements, operational improvements, and railside improvements for Union Station. $150,000,000 No N/A
20204 Portland / ODOT Portland / ODOT Broadway / Weidler Interchange Area Multimodal Improvements Broadway / Weidler / I-5 Construct multimodal transportation improvements supporting the ODOT Broadway / Weidler (Rose Quarter) Interchange Project, including enhancements of surface streets, lids over the freeway, and a new ped/bike bridge over I-5 at Clackamas St, consistent with the adopted N/NE Quadrant Plan and Broadway / Weidler Facility Plan. Supports future Green Loop project. $10,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
20205 Portland Portland Central Eastside Access and Circulation Enhancement Project Central Eastside Improve access and circulation in the Central Eastside by adding new signals and crossings at Hawthorne & Clay ramp, Salmon & Grand, Salmon & MLK, Washington & Grand, Washington & MLK, Ankeny & MLK, Ankeny & Sandy, 16th & Irving, modifying signals at Stark & Grand, Clay & Grand, Mill & MLK, and reconstructing SE Clay St from Water to Grand. $5,400,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
20206 Portland Portland SE Water Ave Realignment, Phase 2 Water Ave, SE (Clay – 2nd Pl) Realign Water Ave to the east along railroad tracks to support OMSI area redevelopment. $8,000,000 Yes Years 1-10
30001 Portland Portland Ainsworth Bridge Pedestrian/Bicycle Improvements Ainsworth St, N (Bridge over I-5) Construct improvements to the bridge to create a safe and pleasant crossing for pedestrians and bicyclists over I-5. $1,375,950 No
30004 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd Pedestrian Improvements Columbia Blvd, N (Swift - Portland Rd; Argyle Way - Albina) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $4,213,209 No
30005 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd / Railroad Bridge Replacement Columbia Blvd, N (bridge over railroad tracks) Replace the existing fracture critical Columbia Blvd bridge (#078) over railroad tracks with a new structure, and perform seismic upgrades on parallel bridge (#078A). $3,839,995 Yes Years 1 - 10
30006 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd Noise Walls Columbia Blvd, N (Oswego - Denver) Install noise walls on the south side. $1,000,000 No
30008 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd ITS Columbia Blvd, N/NE (I-205 - Burgard) Communications infrastructure including closed circuit TV cameras, truck priority detection, variable message signs for remote monitoring and control of traffic flow for six signals. $390,059 Yes Years 1 - 10
30010 ODOT ODOT I-5 Delta Park, Phase 2 Denver Ave, N (Victory - Argyle) Construct shared-use path; rehabilitate, resurface and restripe Denver Ave for buffered bike lanes; connect shared-use path to Columbia Slough levee trail. $10,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30014 Portland Portland Failing Street Neighborhood Greenway Shaver St, N (Concord - Montana); Montana Ave, N (Shaver - Failing); Failing St, N/NE (Concord - 19th); Ridgewood Dr, NE (19th - 26th) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway from Concord to 26th & Regents. Construct street improvements to provide a safe and pleasant connection between the Overlook MAX station and the Mississippi District, including pedestrian/bicycle way-finding and festival street treatments. Redesign intersection of 26th & Regents to improve traffic flow and safety. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30015 Portland Portland Going St ITS Going St, N (Interstate - Greeley) Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $557,250 Yes Years 1 - 10
30016 Portland Portland Going/Greeley Interchange Improvements Going/Greeley, N Redesign Going/Greeley interchange including climbing lane on Going to improve truck movement between Swan Island, Lower Albina, and I-5.
$16,750,000 No
30018 Portland Portland Hayden Island Street Network Improvements, Phase 1 Hayden Island, N Implement street plan for Hayden Island to improve circulation and access for all modes. $1,834,600 Yes Years 11 - 20
30020 ODOT ODOT Columbia River Crossing I-5, N (Victory Blvd - Washington border) Replace I-5/Columbia River bridges and improve interchanges on I-5. $2,982,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30028 Portland Portland Killingsworth Street Improvements Killingsworth St, N/NE (Interstate - MLK Jr) Construct street improvements to improve pedestrian connections to Interstate MAX LRT and to establish a main street character promoting pedestrian-oriented activities. $3,728,869 Yes Years 1 - 10
30030 Portland Portland N Killingsworth Streetscape Improvements Killingsworth St, N (Greeley - Denver) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, transit stops, and signals. $1,851,960 No
30033 TriMet TriMet Portland Vancouver Light Rail Expo Center - Vancouver, WA Extend light rail service from Expo Center to Vancouver, WA. $1,075,965,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
30035 Portland ODOT Lombard St ITS Lombard St, N/NE (MLK Jr - Philadelphia) Communications infrastructure including closed circuit TV camera, Bluetooth detection, improved bus priority variable message signs for remote monitoring and control of traffic flow at the intersections with MLK Jr, Interstate, Greeley, Portsmouth, Philadelphia/Ivanhoe. $673,440 Yes Years 11 - 20
30037 Portland / ODOT ODOT N Lombard Corridor Improvements Lombard St, N (Woolsey - MLK) Design and implement transportation and streetscape improvements to improve safety and promote pedestrian-oriented uses along the corridor and to create a safe, pleasant pedestrian link over I-5, including intersections improvements at Montana & Lombard and an improved pedestrian crossing of the Interstate 5 on-ramp.The project will be coordinated with ODOT to address potential impacts to Lombard and the I-5 interchange. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30038 Portland Portland Marine Dr ITS Marine Dr, N/NE (Portland Rd - 185th) Install CCTV at N Portland Rd and changeable message signs at Portland Rd, Vancouver and 185th $238,510 Yes Years 1 - 10
30039 Port Railroad Marine Dr Rail Overcrossing Marine Dr, N (at Rivergate West) Reroute rail tracks and construct an above-grade rail crossing at Rivergate West entrance to improve safety and reduce vehicle and rail traffic conflicts. $13,644,200 Yes Years 1 - 10
30042 Portland TriMet MLK Jr Blvd Transit Improvements MLK Jr Blvd, NE (Broadway - Lombard) Provide capital improvements that enhance the frequent bus service along MLK Jr Blvd. $1,926,330 Yes Years 11 - 20
30050 Portland ODOT St Johns Pedestrian Improvements St Johns Pedestrian District, N Enhance pedestrian access to transit, improve safety, and enhance the streetscape such as better lighting and crossings. Improvements including realigning the "ivy" island, curb extensions, a new traffic signal at Richmond/Lombard, and pedestrian connections between St. Johns and the riverfront based on the St Johns/Lombard Plan. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30055 Region Railroad North Portland Junction: Undoing the "X" North Portland Junction, N Eliminate the at-grade crossing of UPRR and BNSF tracks at North Portland Junction. $33,598,000 No
30056 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd Protected Bikeway Columbia Blvd, N/NE (MLK Jr Blvd - Lombard St) Design and implement a protected bikeway or multi-use path. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $6,000,000 No
30059 Portland ODOT N Lombard Main Street Improvements Lombard, N (N Tyler - N Woolsey) Implement main street improvements along N Lombard consistent with the St Johns/Lombard Plan, including curb extensions and street lighting. Provide separated in-roadway bicycle facilities from Ida to Portsmouth. $1,834,600 Yes Years 1 - 10
30063 Region Railroad Railroad Bridge and Track Improvements BNSF Mainline at Willamette and Columbia River Bridges, N Improve rail track conditions on approaches to Willametter River and Columbia River bridges to increase railroad speed and capacity. $10,751,000 No
30065 Region Railroad North Portland Junction Crossover Improvements North Portland Junction, N Upgrade rail track with revised crossovers, centralized traffic control tie-in, and increased turning radius to accommodate higher rail speeds and capacity.
$23,600,000 No
30066 Region Portland Columbia Blvd Rail Overcrossing Columbia Blvd & Peninsula Junction, N Grade separate Columbia Blvd at Penn Junction to eliminate three at-grade rail crossings. $28,935,000 No
30068 Portland Portland Burgard St Viaduct Replacement Burgard, N (Bridge over UPRR) Replace the existing N Burgard St Viaduct (#001) over the UPRR tracks. Include pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $3,045,241 Yes Years 1 - 10
30069 Region Railroad Columbia Slough Rail Bridge Terminal 6 - South Rivergate (across Columbia Slough) Construct a rail bridge across Columbia Slough to provide rail connection to South Rivergate from Terminal 6.
$10,840,000 No
30070 Portland Portland St Johns Truck Strategy, Phase 2 Lombard St, N (Bruce - St Louis); Fessenden, N (Columbia Way - St Louis); St Louis, N (Lombard - Fessenden); Columbia Blvd & Portland Rd (intersection) Address pedestrian safety, bicycle safety and neighborhood livability impacts associated with cut-through truck traffic on N St Louis Ave and N Fessenden St. Construct pedestrian crossing safety and traffic calming improvements, such as curb extensions and median islands, and redesign the Columbia/Portland intersection as outlined in the St Johns Truck Strategy Phase II. $3,346,126 Yes Years 1 - 10
30072 Portland/Port Portland Rivergate ITS Rivergate, N Connect real-time information to ODOT's Highway ITC systems. $480,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30076 Region Railroad Columbia River Rail Bridge Improvements BNSF Rail Bridge (over Columbia River) Replace existing swing span with lift span and relocate position to mid-river channel. Project creates wider and quicker opening, reduces I-5 lifts, eases river navigation, and could accommodate a third rail track. $35,548,800 No
30077 Port Railroad Barnes Yard to Terminal 4 Rail Access Barnes Yard - Terminal 4, N Add dedicated track for Terminal 4 through Barnes Yard and add new track from Barnes Yard to Terminal 4. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30080 Portland Portland Burgard/Lombard Corridor Improvements Burgard/Lombard, N (UPRR Bridge - Columbia Blvd) Improve the intersection of Burgard & Time Oil Rd to add turn lanes and construct a multi-use path along Burgard. $2,635,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30081 Portland Portland N Argyle Corridor Improvements Argyle Way, N (Columbia - Denver) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities on N Argyle from N Columbia Blvd to N Denver Ave. Construct safety and connectivity improvements at the Columbia, Brandon, and Denver intersections. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30083 Portland Portland Hayden Island Street Network Improvements, Phase 2 Hayden Island, N Implement street plan for Hayden Island to improve circulation and access for all modes. $1,834,600 No
30084 Portland Portland Columbia Blvd / Columbia Way Bridge Replacement Columbia Blvd, N (bridge over Columbia Way) Replace the existing structurally deficient Columbia Blvd bridge (#079) over Columbia Way with a new structure. $6,993,958 No
30086 Portland Portland Swan Island Active Transportation Improvements Swan Island, N Improve access and mobility on Swan Island by constructing the recommended bikeway and trail network in the Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030, including an improved bikeway connection from Basin to Going Ct. $9,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
30087 Portland Portland North Portland Greenway Trail, Segment 1 Kelley Point Park - Columbia Blvd, N Build a multi-use trail connecting Kelley Point Park to N Columbia Blvd at Chimney Park.
$9,559,102 Yes Years 11 - 20
30088 Portland Portland North Portland Greenway Trail, Segment 2 Columbia Blvd - Cathedral Park, N Build a multi-use trail connecting Chimney Park, Pier Park, Baltimore Woods, Cathedral Park, and St Johns. $2,083,874 Yes Years 1 - 10
30089 Portland Portland North Portland Greenway Trail, Segment 3 Cathedral Park - Swan Island, N Build a multi-use trail connecting the Cathedral Park with Swan Island via University of Portland and
Willamette Cove. $14,787,630 Yes Years 11 - 20
30090 Portland Portland North Portland Greenway Trail, Segment 4 Swan Island - Going St, N Build a multi-use trail connecting Waud Bluff Trail to N Going Street through Swan Island.
$5,256,420 Yes Years 11 - 20
30091 Portland Railroad North Portland Greenway Trail, Segment 5 Albina Yard from Swan Island to Rose Quarter Build a multi-use trail along the Albina Yard connecting Swan Island to the Rose Quarter. $7,306,910 Yes Years 11 - 20
30092 Portland / Port Portland / Port Rivergate Blvd Overcrossing Rivergate Blvd, N (over railroad tracks) Build an over-crossing to grade-separate N Rivergate Blvd from the railroad tracks in the Rivergate Industrial Area. Install ITS communication infrastructure including advance notification systems for rail blockage and CCTV cameras to monitor truck and rail traffic in the South Rivergate Industrial District. $14,200,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30093 Portland Portland NoPo Greenway Trail: Columbia Blvd Bridge Columbia Blvd, N (at Chimney Park) Construct a pedestrian/bicycle bridge over Columbia Blvd and adjacent connections. Connects North Portland Greenway Trail segments 1 and 2. $2,612,381 Yes Years 1 - 10
30094 Region Railroad N Fessenden St Bridge Replacement Fessenden St, N (over railroad cut) Replace existing structurally-deficient, weight-restricted bridge (owned by BNSF) over railroad cut. $4,700,000 No
30095 Region Railroad N Willamette Blvd Bridge Replacement Willamette Blvd, N (over railroad cut) Replace existing structurally-deficient, weight-restricted bridge (owned by BNSF) over railroad cut. $9,750,000 No
30096 Portland Portland N Willamette Blvd Semi-Viaduct Replacement Willamette Blvd, N (semi-viaduct on bluff near Chase Ave) Replace existing poor-condition, weight-restricted semi-viaduct (#007) to ensure continued use by transit and emergency response. $532,751 Yes Years 1 - 10
30097 Port Port T6 Internal Overcrossing Marine Dr - Terminal 6, N Construct an elevated roadway between Marine Dr and Terminal 6. $3,649,084 Yes Years 11 - 20
30098 Port Port T6 Modernization Terminal 6 Provide improvements to container terminal including crane electronics and stormwater improvements. $8,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30099 Port Port T4 Modernization Terminal 4 Renovate operation areas at T4 to create intermodal processing areas. Rail spur relocation and expansion, grain elevator demolition, wharf removal. $14,906,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30100 Port Port T6 Second Entrance from Marine Drive Terminal 6 Construct 2nd entrance from Marine Drive and internal rail overcrossing to Terminal 6. $12,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30101 Port Port T6 Suttle Road entrance Terminal 6 Access to T6 off the terminus of Suttle Road, improvements to existing Suttle Road. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30102 Port Port Terminal 6 Rail Support Yard Improvements Terminal 6, N Increase Terminal 6 rail capacity. $10,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30103 ODOT ODOT I-5 Delta Park, Phase 3 Denver Ave, N (Argyle-Schmeer) Construct highest priority improvements consistent with the Delta-Lombard Environmental Assessment. Replace Denver Viaducts over Columbia Slough and Columbia Blvd / UPRR. $30,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
30104 Port Railroad Bonneville Rail Yard Build Out Bonneville Rail Yard Construct two interior yard tracks at Bonneville Yard and complete the double track lead from the wye at the east end of the yard to UP Barnes Yard. Add rail staging capacity for South Rivergate. $3,600,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30105 Port Port Ramsey Yard Utilization Ramsey Yard Connect the existing set out track along the west side of the main lead with the industrial lead near the south end to provide a location to store a unit train. $1,700,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30106 Port Port Time Oil Road Reconstruction Time Oil Rd, N (Lombard - Rivergate) Reconstruct Time Oil Road $9,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30107 Portland/Port Railroad Cathedral Park Quiet Zone Cathedral Park UPRR Tracks, N Address rail switching noise related to the Toyota operations at T-4 by improving multiple public rail crossings in the St. Johns Cathedral Park area.
$9,324,497 Yes Years 11 - 20
30108 Portland Portland N Hayden Island Dr Ped/Bike Improvements Hayden Island Dr, N Construct a multi-use path on one side of N Hayden Island Dr, and install pedestrian/bicycle crossing improvements. $3,000,000 No
30109 Region Region Willamette River Channel Deepening Willamette River Deepen the portions of the Willamette River with deep draft infrastructure to ~43' where appropriate. Allow Willamette River terminals to also benefit from the Columbia River's new controlling depth. $200,000,000 No
30110 Portland Portland Willamette Blvd Bikeway Willamette Blvd, N (Interstate - Menlo); Amherst / Yale, N (Woolsey - Peninsular Crossing Trail) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway from Interstate to Rosa Parks, enhance existing bikeway from Rosa Parks to Woolsey, and provide a neighborhood greenway on Yale and Amherst. $750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
30111 Portland Portland Hayden Island Bridge Oregon Slough west of I-5 Design and construct an arterial bridge from Expo Center to East Hayden Island. Explore feasibility of designs that would prioritize transit, bikes, and emergency vehicle access, and not facilitate cut-through traffic for vehicles that do not have origins or destinations on the island. $80,000,000 No
40001 Region Portland 11th/13th Ave Rail Overcrossing 11th/13th Ave, NE (over Kenton Line railroad) Construct roadway overcrossing at NE 11th/13th over Kenton line. $35,000,000 No
40006 Portland Portland Marine Dr & 33rd Intersection Improvements Marine Dr & 33rd Ave, NE Signalize intersection to improve freight operations. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40007 Portland Portland NE 42nd/47th Ave Bridge & Corridor Improvements 42nd/47th Ave, NE (Killingsworth - Columbia) Replace the weight-restricted NE 42nd Ave Bridge (#075) over NE Portland Hwy and the adjacent railway, and add pedestrian and bicycle facilities to the bridge and the roadway from Killingsworth to Columbia. This project will remove the weight restriction, maintain vertical clearance for over-dimensional freight, and provide pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $10,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40009 Portland Portland NE 47th Ave Corridor Improvements 47th Ave, NE (Columbia - Cornfoot) Improve street and reconfigure intersections between Columbia and Cornfoot to better facilitate freight access to industrial areas. Street improvement will include pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $4,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40012 Portland Portland NE 72nd Ave Pedestrian Improvements 72nd Ave, NE (Thomas Cully Park - Prescott) Construct sidewalks, curbs, and storm drainage improvements along 72nd and improve pedestrian crossings.. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40013 Portland ODOT 82nd Ave Corridor Improvements 82nd Ave, NE/SE, (Killingsworth -Clatsop) Design and implement multimodal improvements to sidewalks, crossings, transit stops, striping, and signals to enhance ped/bike safety, access to transit, and transit operations. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40016 Portland ODOT NE 82nd Ave Ped/Bike Improvements, Phase 2 82nd, NE (Alderwood - Columbia Blvd) Construct pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $3,603,402 Yes Years 11 - 20
40018 Portland ODOT Killingsworth/I-205 Interchange Improvements Killingsworth/I-205, NE Widen the southbound on-ramp to three lanes. $750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40020 Portland Portland NE 92nd Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 92nd Ave, NE (Fremont - Halsey) Construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit, and design and implement bicycle facilities. $2,750,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40023 Port Port Airport Way Return and Exit Roads PDX Terminal Area Relocate Airport Way exit roadway and construct new return roadway (Terminal Access Study, projects R4 and R5; to be scoped by PDX Master Plan). $6,400,900 Yes Years 1 - 10
40025 Port Port 82nd & Airport Way Grade Separation 82nd Ave & Airport Way, NE Construct a grade-separated overcrossing to allow for uninterrupted flow along Airport Way and remove at-grade light rail crossing. $50,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40027 Portland/Port Portland Alderwood Bikeway, Phase 2 Alderwood St, NE, (Cornfoot - Columbia Blvd) Design and implement a multi-use path along the west side of Alderwood Rd. $2,491,662 Yes Years 1 - 10
40028 Portland Portland NE Argyle Street Extension Argyle, NE (14th - MLK Jr) Extend NE Argyle to provide a more connected street grid. This street will serve as a collector/distributor for industrial businesses and reduce traffic congestion at the MLK/Columbia intersection. $11,397,579 No
40032 Port Portland Columbia/Alderwood Intersection Improvements Columbia/Alderwood, NE Reconstruct intersections to provide left turn pockets, enhance turning radii, and improve circulation for trucks serving expanding air cargo facilities south of Portland. Improve traffic operations and freight mobility on Columbia Blvd between Cully and Alderwood. $5,527,760 Yes Years 1 - 10
40036 Portland/Port Portland Cornfoot Rd Corridor Improvements Cornfoot Rd, NE (47th - Alderwood) Construct a multi-use path on the north side of Cornfoot Rd and install missing guardrail segments on the south side. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $3,626,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40037 Portland Portland Cully Blvd Safety Improvements, Phase 2 Cully Blvd, NE (Columbia - Killingsworth; Prescott - Fremont) Construct sidewalk infill on both sides of street, provide new bicycle facilities (Columbia - Killingsworth), and enhance existing bicycle facilities (Prescott - Fremont). $4,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40039 Portland Portland NE Fremont Streetscape Improvements Fremont St, NE (42nd-52nd) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, transit stops, and signals. $7,446,133 No
40042 Portland Portland Halsey St Bridge Seismic Retrofit Halsey St, NE (67th - 68th) Retrofit existing seismically vulnerable bridge across I-84 (#021) to ensure emergency response and economic recovery in the event of an earthquake. $7,670,501 No
40045 Portland Portland Hollywood Town Center Safety Improvements Hollywood Town Center, NE Implement multimodal safety improvements including traffic signals, restriping, improved pedestrian crossings, and connections to transit center. $7,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40046 ODOT ODOT I-205 Northbound Auxiliary Lane I-205, NE/SE (I-84 - Killingsworth) Construct an auxiliary lane $15,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40053 Portland Portland NE Killingworth Safety Improvements Killingsworth St, NE (Williams - 33rd) Design and implement traffic calming and pedestrian crossing improvements. $900,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40058 Portland Portland Grand/MLK ITS Grand/MLK, NE/SE (Columbia Blvd - Clay) Install ITS infrastructure (communication network, enhanced bus detection, Bluetooth detection, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system consistent with our policies of moving people more effectively. $989,115 Yes Years 11 - 20
40059 Portland ODOT MLK Jr Blvd Freight Improvements MLK Jr, NE (Columbia - Lombard) Expand roadway to provide better connection between streets for improved freight movement in and through the area. $12,605,000 No
40061 Portland Portland Columbia/MLK Intersection Improvements, Phase 1 Columbia/MLK, NE Intersection and signalization improvements with right turn lane from westbound Columbia to northbound MLK. $3,850,187 Yes Years 1 - 10
40062 Portland Portland N Mississippi Streetscape Improvements Mississippi Ave, N (Fremont - Skidmore) Construct streetscape improvements to enhance the area as a Pedestrian District. $2,500,000 No
40065 Portland Portland NE Prescott Safety Improvements Prescott St, NE (81st - 122nd) Construct bicycle facilities, sidewalks, and crossing improvements for pedestrian and bicycle safety and to improve access to transit. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40068 Portland Portland Sandy Blvd Corridor Improvements, Phase 2 Sandy Blvd, NE (47th - 101st) Retrofit existing street with multi-modal street improvements including bicycle facilities, redesign of selected intersections to improve pedestrian crossings, streetscape, and safety improvements. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $6,481,860 Yes Years 1 - 10
40069 Portland Portland Sandy Blvd ITS Sandy Blvd, NE (82nd - Burnside) Install ITS infrastructure (communication network, enhanced bus detection, Bluetooth detection, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system consistent with our policies of moving people more effectively. $519,110 Yes Years 1 - 10
40071 Portland Portland Mason Neighborhood Greenway Mason St, NE (Michigan - Sandy) Design and implement a bikeway using neighborhood greenway and/or separated in-roadway treatments, with crossing improvements as needed. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40073 Port Port SW Quad Access Southwest Quad, NE (at 33rd) Provide street access from NE 33rd Ave into the SW Quad property. $5,917,500 Yes Years 1 - 10
40074 Portland Portland Twenties Bikeway 20s and 30s Aves, NE/SE (Lombard - Crystal Springs) Design and implement a bikeway from Lombard to Crystal Springs & 45th using neighborhood greenways and bike lanes with a varying alignment along the NE/SE 20s and 30s Avenues. $3,353,690 Yes Years 1 - 10
40079 Portland Portland Marine Dr Intersection Improvements Marine/Bridgeton and Marine/Faloma/6th, NE Intersection improvements at NE Bridgeton Rd and NE Faloma & 6th. $1,866,706 No
40081 Port Port/TriMet PDX Light Rail Station/Track Realignment PDX Terminal Area Realign light rail track into airport terminal building to accommodate terminal expansion plans. $16,330,700 Yes Years 11 - 20
40082 Portland Portland NE Seventies Bikeway 70s Aves, NE (Thomas Cully Park - I-84) Design and implement a bikeway using neighborhood greenway and/or separated in-roadway treatments, with crossing improvements as needed at major streets. Construct a multi-use path on the east side of NE 72nd Dr through the golf course. $1,409,019 Yes Years 1 - 10
40085 Region Railroad Kenton Rail Line Upgrade Kenton Line, N/NE Upgrade existing track to second main track with new double track from Peninsula Junction to I-205 and increase track speeds between North Portland, Peninsula Junction, to Reynolds on UP's Kenton Line. Part of triangle project with ODOT. $48,165,537 Yes Years 1 - 10
40086.1 Portland Portland Halsey St Bikeway, Phase 1 Halsey St, NE (67th - 81st) Implement a lane reconfiguration including bicycle facilities, with improved pedestrian/bicycle crossings and connections to other pedestrian/bicycle routes. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40086.2 Portland Portland Halsey St Bikeway, Phase 2 Halsey St, NE (81st - I-205) Design and implement bicycle facilities and improved crossings. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40091 Port / Portland Port / Portland PIC Ped/Bike Improvements 92nd Dr, NE (Columbia - Alderwood); Portland International Center, NE Construct bicycle and pedestrian facilities as shown in the PDX Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan. $1,163,835 Yes Years 1 - 10
40093 Port Portland/Port Airtrans/Cornfoot Intersection Improvements Airtrans/Cornfoot, NE Add signals and improve turn lanes at AirTrans Way / Cornfoot Rd. $650,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40097 Port Portland Airport Way Braided Ramps Airport Way, NE (I-205 - Mt Hood Ave) Construct braided ramps between I-205 interchange and Mt Hood interchange. $59,000,000 No
40100 Portland Portland NE 33rd Ave Bridge Replacement 33rd Ave, NE (over railroad tracks and Columbia Blvd) Replace the existing seismically vulnerable 33rd Ave bridge (#009) over railroad tracks and provide pedestrian and bicycle facilities on the new structure. Improve and signalize the intersection of 33rd & Columbia, and remove the seismically vulnerable, fracture critical ramp over Columbia (#009A). Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $9,200,443 Yes Years 11 - 20
40102 Portland/Port Portland Columbia Blvd Freight Improvements Columbia Blvd, NE (60th - 82nd) Construct street and intersection modifications to improve freight reliability and access to industrial properties. This project will be refined through the proposed Columbia Corridor Access Study. $14,859,000 No
40104 Portland Portland Connected Cully Killingsworth, NE (42nd - Cully); Prescott, NE (42nd - Cully); 60th, NE (Prescott - Portland Hwy); 72nd, NE (Emerson - Killingsworth); 54th/55th (Prescott - Killingsworth); 66th/67th (Sandy - Prescott) Make improvements to calm traffic, fill in the missing sidewalks along transit routes, and increase walking and bicycling by creating new north/south connections to schools. $3,337,372 Yes Years 1 - 10
40106 Portland Portland Inner Sandy Blvd Bikeway Sandy Blvd, NE (12th - 47th) Design and implement separated in-roadway or protected bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $4,476,520 Yes Years 11 - 20
40107 Portland Portland Outer Alberta Neighborhood Greenway Alberta St, NE (72nd - I-205 Path) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40108 Portland Portland NE Broadway Corridor Improvements, Phase 2 Broadway, NE (24th - 42nd) Design and implement bicycle facilities and improve pedestrian/bicycle crossings. Construct traffic signals, improve transit stops, and construct streetscape improvements. $5,618,659 Yes Years 11 - 20
40109 Portland Portland NE 14th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 14th Ave, NE (Halsey - Lombard) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $774,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40110 Portland Portland Upper NE 22nd Ave Neighborhood Greenway 22nd Ave, NE (Tillamook - Lombard) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $685,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40111 Portland Portland NE Simpson St Neighborhood Greenway Simpson St, NE (33rd - Portland Hwy) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $560,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40112 Portland/Port Portland Columbia/Cully Intersection Improvements Columbia / Cully, NE Construct northbound right turn lane on NE Cully and signalize the intersection of NE Cully Blvd & NE Columbia Blvd. Construct pedestrian and bicycle facilities around intersection. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40113 ODOT ODOT Columbia/MLK Intersection Improvements, Phase 2 Columbia/MLK, NE Intersection and signalization improvements with a dedicated northbound right turn lane, a second dedicated southbound left turn lane, wider sidewalks adjacent to the roadway, and improvements to the geometry of the existing southbound through/right turn lane. $12,000,000 No
40114 Portland Portland / Port Columbia Slough Trail Gaps Columbia Slough Trail, N/NE Close gaps in Columbia Slough Trail: North Portland Greenway to North Portland Rd; Vancouver to 47th; Elrod to Marine Dr; I-205 to 158th. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40115 Portland Portland 60th Ave MAX Station Area Improvements 60th Ave MAX Station Area, NE Implement pedestrian and bicycle improvements in the 60th Ave MAX Station Area identified in the Eastside MAX Station Area Communities Project. $7,570,723 Yes Years 1 - 10
40116 Portland Portland NE 7th/9th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 7th/9th Ave, NE (Weidler - Holman) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway along the NE 7th/9th Ave corridor from Weidler to Holman (alignment to be determined during design phase), using traffic calming treatments as needed to meet recommended performance guidelines for neighborhood greenways and adjacent local streets. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40117 Portland Railroad/ODOT Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 2 Banfield Corridor, NE (21st - Hollywood) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles within the Banfield (I-84) Corridor from 21st Ave to the Hollywood Transit Center. $7,700,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
40118.1 Portland Railroad Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 3 Banfield Corridor, NE (Hollywood - Broadway) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles within the Banfield (I-84) Corridor from the Hollywood Transit Center to NE Broadway. $9,200,000 No
40118.2 Portland Portland Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 4 Broadway / Jonesmore / Schuyler, NE (62nd - 92nd) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles along Broadway and Jonesmore adjacent to the I-84 sound wall, with an improved crossing of 74th Ave. Provide neighborhood greenway bikeway connections west to 62nd & Hancock and east to 92nd & Schuyler, with an improved crossing of 82nd Ave.. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40118.3 Portland Railroad Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 5 Banfield Corridor, NE (Jonesmore - Halsey) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles within the Banfield (I-84) Corridor from Jonesmore to Halsey. $3,600,000 No
40119 Portland ODOT Sullivan's Gulch Trail, Segment 6 Banfield Corridor, NE (92nd - I-205 Path) Construct a multi-use trail for pedestrians and bicycles underneath the I-205 structure, connecting to the I-205 Path and Gateway Green. Provide a bikeway connection to 92nd Ave via NE Halsey St Frontage Road. $3,377,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40120 Port Port Airport Way Terminal Entrance Roadway Relocation PDX Terminal Area Relocate and widen Airport Way northerly at Terminal entrance (to be scoped by PDX Master Plan). $12,818,000 No
40121 Port Port PDX Transportation Demand Management (TDM) PDX and PIC, NE Implement strategies at PDX and PIC properties that reduce auto trips in the airport area. Programs to be undertaken with other area businesses/developers to maximize effectiveness; possible administration through a transportation management association. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40122 Port Port Airport Way East Terminal Access Link Roadway PDX Construct Airport Way East Terminal access link roadway. Facilitates direct East Terminal Access, preventing failure of Main Terminal Roadway $19,092,300 Yes Years 11 - 20
40123 Region Portland Cully Blvd Rail Overcrossing Cully Blvd, NE (over Kenton Line railroad) Construct roadway overcrossing at NE Cully Blvd. over Kenton line. $35,000,000 No
40124 Port Port Northside Redevelopment PDX Airport Construct a new apron for business aviation. $5,800,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40125 Port Port Terminal Exit Roadway Lanes PDX Airport Add new lanes at Post Office Curves and Parking Plaza to provide additional capacity for anticipated growth in passenger traffic. $2,604,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40126 Port Port Airport Way Westbound Approaching Return Road PDX Airport Add new lane to provide additional capacity for anticipated growth in passenger traffic. $1,080,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40127 Port Port Terminal Deplaning Curbside Roadway Lanes PDX Airport Add new lane to provide additional capacity for anticipated growth in passenger traffic. $2,976,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40128 Port Port Terminal Enplaning Rdwy Expansion PDX Airport Add one lane on the approach and one lane on the exit to the terminal upper roadway $3,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
40129 Port Port Airport Way Outbound Roadway Widening PDX Airport Add new lane in outbound direction east of 82nd to provide additional capacity for anticipated growth in passenger traffic. $3,335,000 No
40130 Portland Portland MLK Streetcar Extension MLK Jr Blvd, NE (Broadway - Killingsworth) Public outreach, planning, design, engineering, and construction for future streetcar extension from Lloyd District to NE Portland. $65,000,000 No
40131 Portland Portland Hollywood Streetcar Extension Sandy Blvd, NE (14th - 42nd); Burnside St, E (Grand - 14th); Broadway/Weidler, NE (Grand - 42nd) Alternatives analysis, public outreach, planning, design, engineering, and construction for future streetcar extension from Central City to Hollywood Town Center via either Sandy Blvd or Broadway/Weidler. $70,000,000 No
50001 Portland Portland Parkrose Connectivity Improvements 102nd and 109th, NE (Killingsworth - Sandy); Killingsworth, NE (109nd - 102nd) Supplement access route for commercial properties in Parkrose by creating a loop road connection serving truck access functions, pedestrian, and bike connections. $10,612,379 No
50003 Portland Portland 102nd Ave Streetscape Improvements, Phase 3 102nd Ave, SE (Burnside - Washington) Implement Gateway regional center plan with boulevard design retrofit, new traffic signals, improved pedestrian facilities and crossings, street lighting and new bicycle facilities. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50004 Portland Portland NE 102nd Ave Corridor Improvements 102nd Ave, NE (Sandy - Weidler) Construct sidewalks and improved crossings, install bicycle facilities, and make traffic safety improvements. $5,224,878 Yes Years 1 - 10
50005 Portland Portland 122nd Ave ITS 122nd Ave, NE/SE (Airport Way - Powell) Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $515,703 Yes Years 1 - 10
50009 Portland Portland NE 148th Ave Safety Improvements 148th Ave, NE (Airport Way - Sacramento) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities, including intersection crossing improvements at 148th & Sandy. Improve traffic safety by addressing line of sight issues just north of I-84. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50012 Portland Portland NE 162nd Ave Bikeway 162nd Ave, NE (Sandy - Thompson) Design and implement separated in-roadway bicycle facilities. $4,107,779 Yes Years 11 - 20
50014.1 Portland Portland Gateway 99th Ave Streetscape Improvements 99th Ave, NE (Stark - Pacific) Construct streetscape improvements including wider sidewalks, lighting, street trees, center turn lane, bike lanes, and new signals. $26,947,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50014.2 Portland Portland Gateway Pacific St Streetscape Improvements Pacific St, NE (99th - 102nd) Construct streetscape improvements including wider sidewalks, lighting, street trees, center turn lane, bike lanes, and new signals. $7,540,000 No
50015 Portland Portland Gateway 99th/96th Streetscape Improvements 99th/96th Ave, SE (Stark - Market) Construct streetscape improvements including wider sidewalks, lighting, street trees, center turn lane, bike lanes, and new signals. $4,209,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50016 Portland Portland Airport Way ITS Airport Way, NE (I-205 - 158th) Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $278,251 Yes Years 1 - 10
50019 Portland Portland Gateway Local Street Improvements, Phase 1 Gateway Regional Center, NE/SE High priority local street and pedestrian improvements in regional center. $8,418,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50020 Portland Portland Gateway Local Street Improvements, Phase 2 Gateway Regional Center, NE/SE High priority local street and pedestrian improvements in regional center. $8,418,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50022 Portland Portland Gateway Regional Center TSM Gateway Regional Center, NE/SE Implement a comprehensive traffic management plan throughout the regional center to reduce cut-through traffic on residential streets and improve traffic flow on regional streets. Project includes utility improvements. $1,944,558 Yes Years 11 - 20
50024 Portland Portland Gateway--Glisan Streetscape Improvements Glisan St, NE (I-205 - 106th) Implement Gateway regional center plan with boulevard design retrofit, new traffic signals, bike facilities, improved pedestrian facilities and crossings, and street lighting. $3,240,930 Yes Years 1 - 10
50025 Portland Portland Outer Glisan Safety and Streetscape Improvements Glisan St, NE (122nd - City Limits) Install bicycle facilities on existing street. Install street trees (requires sidewalk widening, curb extensions, and/or bioswales). Install a signal at 131st Pl to improve pedestrian and vehicular access to Glisan St. $1,963,022 Yes Years 11 - 20
50027 Portland Portland San Rafael Pedestrian Improvements Halsey - San Rafael & 118th - 132nd, NE Improve pedestrian access to the San Rafael Shopping Center, including street trees. $500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50028 Portland Portland Outer Halsey Pedestrian Improvements Halsey St, NE (122nd-162nd) Construct sidewalks, crossing improvements for pedestrian travel, and access to transit improvements. $6,389,475 Yes Years 11 - 20
50030 Portland Portland Marine Dr & 122nd Intersection Improvements Marine Dr & 122nd, NE Signalize and widen dike to install left turn lane on Marine Drive. $2,361,249 Yes Years 1 - 10
50032 Portland Portland Parkrose Pedestrian Improvements 105th Ave, NE (Sandy - Skidmore) Construct sidewalk and crossing improvements to provide access to transit and schools. $1,277,895 Yes Years 11 - 20
50035 Portland ODOT Outer Sandy Blvd Corridor Improvements Sandy Blvd, NE (141st - City Limits) Widen street to three lanes with a sidewalk and bike lanes. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $2,751,900 Yes Years 11 - 20
50037 Portland Portland San Rafael/Tillamook Neighborhood Greenway San Rafael/Tillamook, NE (108th - 148th) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway, with improved crossings at major streets. $1,777,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50038 Portland Portland Parkrose Heights Pedestrian Improvements San Rafael, NE (111th-122nd); 111th Ave/Dr, NE (Klickitat - Halsey) Construct a sidewalk and crossing improvements to provide access to transit and schools. $5,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50039 Portland Portland Halsey/Weidler Streetscape Improvements Halsey/Weidler, NE (I-205 - 114th) Implement Gateway Regional Center Plan boulevard design including new traffic signals, improved pedestrian facilities and crossings and street lighting. $16,000,000 No
50041 Portland Portland Marine Drive Trail Gaps Marine Dr, N/NE (I-5 - 185th) Close gaps in Marine Dr Trail. $1,077,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50044 Portland Portland Parkrose Neighborhood Greenway Fremont St/Ct, NE (102nd - 115th); 115th Ave, NE (Fremont Ct - Sandy); New trail (I-205 Path - Fremont) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. Project includes a multi-use path and bridge from I-205 Path to NE Fremont St and sidepath along the south side of NE Fremont St. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50045 Portland Portland Woodland Park Neighborhood Greenway Multnomah St, NE (Gateway Transit Center - 99th); 99th Ave, NE (Multnomah - Halsey); Halsey St, NE (99th - 100th); 100th/Weidler/101st/Bell/102nd, NE (Halsey - Tillamook); Tillamook St, NE (102nd - 108th) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. Project potentially includes cycle tracks on 99th, Halsey, and 102nd. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50046 Portland Portland Knott/Russell Neighborhood Greenway Knott/Russell/Brazee/Sacramento/Thompson, NE (102nd - 162nd) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. Project includes crossing improvements at 102nd, 122nd, and 148th. $292,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50047 Portland Portland Holladay/Oregon/Pacific (HOP) Greenway Holladay/Oregon/Pacific, NE (Gateway TC - East Holladay Park) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. Project includes crossing improvements at 102nd and 122nd and improvement of gravel streets at Oregon (110th - 111th) and Holladay (118th - 119th). $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50049 Portland Portland 122nd Ave Corridor Improvements 122nd Ave, NE/SE (Sandy - Foster) Design and implement multimodal improvements to sidewalks, crossings, bicycle facilities, transit stops, striping, and signals to enhance ped/bike safety, access to transit, and transit operations. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $8,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
50050 Portland Portland East Fremont Bikeway Fremont St, NE (122nd - 141st) Design and implement bicycle facilities, with traffic calming elements as needed. $951,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50051 Portland Portland East Shaver Bikeway Shaver St, NE (I-205 Path - 141st Dr) Design and implement bicycle facilities, with traffic calming elements as needed. $529,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
50053 Portland Portland NE 148th Ave Sidewalk Infill 148th Ave, NE (Halsey - Glisan) Construct a 6-foot curb-tight sidewalk on the west side of the street. $891,332 Yes Years 1 - 10
50054 Portland / Gresham Portland / Gresham Gresham-Fairview Trail, Phase 5 Sandy - Marine, NE (on or near 185th Ave) Design and construct a multi-use path connecting Sandy Blvd and Marine Dr (Segment E in Gresham Fairview Trail Master Plan). $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
60004 Portland Portland / ODOT NW Bridge Ave Multi-use Path Bridge Ave, NW (St Helens Rd - St Helens Rd) Construct a multi-use path along Bridge Avenue between both St Helens Rd intersections. $1,447,178 Yes Years 11 - 20
60005 Portland Portland Barnes & Burnside Intersection Improvements Barnes/Burnside, NW Install a signal or 4-way stop at Barnes & Burnside near the Wildwood Trail and Pittock Mansion entrance. $458,650 No
60006 Portland Portland Outer W Burnside Corridor Improvements Burnside St, W (23rd - Skyline) Widen street to add bicycle facilities, improve sidewalks, lighting, and crossings. $11,723,745 No
60007 Portland Portland Cornell Bikeway Cornell, NW (30th - City Limits) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $19,171,451 No
60008 Portland Portland NW Everett/Glisan Corridor Improvements Everett/Glisan, NW (Broadway - 23rd) Install improved pedestrian crossings, remodel traffic signals, improve signage at freeway crossings, install new and/or enhance existing bicycle facilities, and provide additional improvements along the corridor to improve safety at high crash locations. $4,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
60012 Portland Portland Kittridge Bridge Seismic Retrofit Kittridge Ave, NW (Front - Yeon) Retrofit existing seismically vulnerable bridge (#010) across railroad tracks to ensure emergency response and access to petroleum supplies located along the Willamette River in the event of an earthquake. $15,249,213 No
60015 Portland Portland Skyline Bikeway Skyline, NW (Hwy 26 - City Limits) Widen street in order to add bicycle facilities and gravel shoulders. $8,088,812 No
60018 Portland ODOT / Railroad Willbridge Industrial Area Rail Overcrossing Willbridge Industrial Area, NW (St Helens Rd - Front Ave) Provide an alternative crossing of the BNSF Railroad to improve connectivity and safety between US 30 and the industrial properties served by NW Front Avenue in the Willbridge area of the NW Industrial District. $23,113,022 No
60019 Portland ODOT NW St Helens Rd Safety Improvements St Helens Rd, NW (107th - Kittridge) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
60023 Portland ODOT Yeon/St Helens ITS Yeon/St Helens, NW (US30) Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $885,499 Yes Years 11 - 20
60024 Portland Portland Wildwood Trail Bridge Wildwood Trail & Burnside, W Construct a pedestrian overcrossing or signalized at-grade pedestrian crossing where Burnside intersects the Wildwood Trail. $2,126,948 Yes Years 1 - 10
60025 Portland Portland Fairview Blvd Bikeway Fairview Blvd, SW (Kingston - Skyline) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $13,479,832 No
60027 Portland Portland / ODOT Con-way Access Improvements 20th Ave, NW (Upshur - Raleigh); 23rd & Vaughn, NW Extend and improve NW 20th Ave from Upshur to Raleigh and improve the intersection of 23rd & Vaughn in accordance with the adopted Northwest Master Plan for Con-way Site. $4,300,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
60029 Portland Multnomah County NW Miller Rd Bikeway Miller, NW (Stark - Cornell) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $5,392,035 No
60030 Portland Portland NW/SW 20th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 20th Ave, NW/SW (Mill - Raleigh) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway, with traffic calming and improved crossings as needed. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
60031 Portland Portland W Burnside & Skyline Intersection Improvements Burnside/Skyline, NW/SW Construct intersection improvements at both legs of the double intersection to improve safety for all modes. $1,850,716 Yes Years 1 - 10
60033 Port Port T2 Redevelopment Terminal 2 Construct rail, rail scale, and crane modernization. $4,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
60034 Port Port T2 Track Reconfiguration and Siding Terminal 2 Construct rail loops and support siding. $8,900,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
60035 Portland Portland Montgomery Park Streetcar Extension NW 18th/19th Ave to Montgomery Park (various route options) Public outreach, planning, design, engineering, and construction for future streetcar extension from NW 18th/19th Ave to Montgomery Park. $35,000,000 No
70001 Portland Portland SE 13th Ave Streetscape Improvements 13th Ave, SE (Malden - Tacoma) Plan and implement streetscape and transportation improvements, including crossing improvements, to increase opportunities to walk and enhance the main street character. $2,223,555 No
70005 Portland Portland Cesar Chavez Corridor Improvements Cesar Chavez Blvd, NE/SE (Sandy - Woodstock) Repair street, upgrade sidewalks, and add pedestrian/bicycle crossing improvements. Upgrade signals and make striping changes to improve traffic safety and transit operations. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70006 Portland Portland 60th Ave Corridor Improvements 60th Ave, NE/SE (Glisan - Belmont) Design and implement signal and intersection improvements to improve safety. Includes the intersections with Belmont, Stark, Burnside, and Glisan. $2,000,000 No
70008 Portland Portland SE 92nd Ave Bikeway 92nd Ave, SE (Holgate - Woodstock) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70009 Portland Portland Belmont Streetscape Improvements Belmont St, SE (25th - 43rd) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, transit stops, and signals. $5,722,698 No
70010 Portland Portland Inner E Burnside Ped/Bike Improvements Burnside St, E (28th - 82nd) Design and implement bicycle facilities and improve pedestrian crossings to provide access to schools and transit. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70013 Portland Portland Inner Division Corridor Improvements, Phase 2 Division St, SE (Cesar Chavez - 60th) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, access to transit, transit stops, and signals. Add separated in-roadway bicycle facilities (52nd - 60th). $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70014 Portland Portland Inner Division Corridor Improvements, Phase 3 Division St, SE (60th - I-205) Construct improvements that enhance access to transit, improve safety and enhance the streetscape such as traffic signals, lighting, bus shelters, benches, and crossings. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70015 Portland TriMet SE Division St Transit Improvements Division St, SE (7th - City Limits) Provide capital improvements that benefit frequent bus service along Division from downtown Portland to Gresham. $5,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70017 Portland Portland Ellis Ped/Bike Improvements Ellis St, SE (92nd - Foster) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $2,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70019 Portland Portland Flavel Dr Roadway Improvements Flavel Dr, SE (45th - Clatsop) Fully improve street from SE 45th to Clatsop Street with travel lanes, curbs, swales, sidewalks, and separated in-roadway bicycle facilities from 52nd to Clatsop. $7,294,088 No
70020 Portland Portland SE Flavel St Pedestrian Improvements Flavel St, SE (82nd - 92nd) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements. $1,277,895 Yes Years 1 - 10
70021 Portland Portland Foster Road Corridor Improvements Foster Rd, SE (Powell - 90th) Improve sidewalks, lighting, crossings, bus shelters, and benches on Foster and improve pedestrian crossings to benefit access to transit. Install separated in-roadway bicycle facilities and widen substandard sidewalks. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70024 Portland Portland Lents Town Center Improvements, Phase 2 Foster/Woodstock, SE (94th - 101st) Implement Lents Town Center Business District Transportation Plan with new traffic signals, pedestrian amenities, wider sidewalks, pedestrian crossings, and street lighting. $11,510,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70027 Portland Portland Harney Dr Bikeway Harney Dr, SE (52nd - Flavel) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,252,000 No
70028 Portland Portland Harold St Bikeway Harold St, SE (52nd - Foster) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,414,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70030 ODOT ODOT SE McLoughlin Blvd Roadway Improvements McLoughlin Blvd, SE (Ross Island Bridge - Tacoma) Provide access management, operational improvements, and safety improvements from Ross Island Bridge to Harold. Widen to six lanes from Harold to Tacoma and construct pedestrian and bike facilities. $96,500,000 No
70031 Portland Portland Middle Holgate Bikeway Holgate Blvd, SE (52nd - I-205) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70032 Portland Portland Holgate Blvd Corridor Improvements Holgate Blvd, SE (39th - 52nd) Reconstruct pavement structure and stormwater drainage facilities, improve corner curb ramps to ADA standards, improve pedestrian crossings, and add bicycle facilities. $3,995,925 Yes Years 11 - 20
70033 Portland Portland Inner Holgate Bikeway Holgate Blvd, SE (McLoughlin - 39th) Design and implement bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70034 Portland/ODOT ODOT I-205 Multi-use Path Crossings I-205 Multi-Use Path & Glisan, NE; I-205 Multi-Use Path & Stark/Washington, SE Improve crossings and access to I-205 multi-use path at Glisan, Stark/Washington, and other intersections as needed. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70041 Portland Portland Inner Milwaukie Streetscape Improvements Milwaukie Ave, SE (Gideon - Mall) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, transit stops, and signals. $4,838,299 Yes Years 11 - 20
70042 Portland Portland Outer Milwaukie Streetscape Improvements Milwaukie Ave, SE (Yukon - Tacoma) Design and implement streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, transit stops, and signals. $5,386,378 No
70044 Portland Portland Mt Scott Blvd Ped/Bike Improvements Flavel / Mt Scott Blvd, SE (92nd - 112th) Build a continuous walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit with crossing improvements at transit stop locations. Design and implement bicycle facilities. $4,676,654 No
70045 Portland ODOT Inner Powell Blvd Corridor Improvements Powell Blvd, SE (Ross Island Bridge - 50th) Retrofit existing street with multimodal safety improvements including enhanced pedestrian and bicycle crossings, pedestrian and bike activated signals, median islands with trees, redesign of selected intersections and stormwater management facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $7,997,100 Yes Years 11 - 20
70046 Portland ODOT Inner Powell Bikeway Powell Blvd, SE (71st - I-205) Design and implement bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $4,767,667 Yes Years 11 - 20
70047 Portland TriMet Foster Rd Transit Improvements Foster Rd, SE (Powell - 90th) Construct improvements that enhance frequent bus service along Foster Rd. $667,784 Yes Years 1 - 10
70049 Portland Portland Reedway Ped/Bike Overcrossing Reedway St, SE (23rd - 26th) Construct a pedestrian/bicycle overcrossing of McLoughlin Blvd, light rail, and railroad tracks. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70050 Multnomah County Multnomah County Sellwood Bridge Replacement Sellwood Bridge, SE/SW Replace weight-restricted bridge. $88,776,380 Yes Years 1 - 10
70052 Portland Portland SE Seventies Bikeway 74th to 80th Aves, NE/SE (I-84 - Clatsop) Design and implement a bikeway using neighborhood greenway and/or separated in-roadway treatments, with crossing improvements as needed at major streets. $2,818,037 Yes Years 1 - 10
70053 Portland Portland Springwater Gap Trail Springwater Corridor, SE (Umatilla - 19th) Construct trail-with-rail multi-use path between Umatilla and 19th to fill in the "Springwater Gap." $3,032,411 Yes Years 1 - 10
70055 Portland Portland Tacoma Main Street Improvements Tacoma St, SE (Sellwood Bridge - McLoughlin) Implement boulevard design based on Tacoma Main Street study recommendations and incorporate McLoughlin Neighborhoods Project recommendations. $5,842,113 Yes Years 11 - 20
70057 Portland Portland Tacoma St ITS Tacoma St, SE (Sellwood Bridge - 45th/Johnson Creek) Communications infrastructure; closed circuit TV cameras, variable message signs for remote monitoring and control of traffic flow for four signals. $231,495 Yes Years 11 - 20
70059 Portland Portland Inner Glisan Bikeway Glisan St, NE (47th - I-205) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $5,352,131 Yes Years 11 - 20
70070 Portland Portland SE 14th/15th Neighborhood Greenway 14th/15th Ave, SE (Ellis - Linn) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway including jogs on Malden, Tolman, and Ellisa. $688,530 Yes Years 11 - 20
70071 Portland Portland Sixties Neighborhood Greenway 60s Aves, NE/SE (Hancock - Springwater Trail) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70072 Portland Portland SE Washington Bikeway Gap Washington St, SE (76th - 92nd) Design and implement bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $783,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70073 Portland Portland SE 34th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 34th Ave, SE (Gladstone - Burnside) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $540,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70074 Portland Portland Inner SE Steele Bikeway Steele St, SE (33rd - 52nd) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,077,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70075 Portland Portland Knapp/Ogden Neighborhood Greenway Knapp/Ogden, SE (27th - 92nd) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway. $882,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70076 Portland ODOT PMLR Active Transportation Improvements Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Corridor, SE Construct a shared-use path along SE McLoughlin Blvd from 17th Ave to the Springwater Corridor Trail and build a bicycle parking center at the Tacoma/Springwater light rail station. This project will be coordinated with ODOT to determine the alignment along McLoughlin Blvd. $8,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70077 Portland Portland SE 9th Ave Bikeway 9th Ave, SE (Division - Center); Center St, SE (9th - 17th) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway on 9th Ave, with separated bicycle facility segments and crossing improvements as needed. $500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70078 Portland Portland/ODOT I-84 Active Corridor Management I-84/Powell/Glisan/Sandy This project expands traveler information and enables incident management techniques that reduce traveler delay and improve safety through the I-84 corridor. $1,207,937 Yes Years 1 - 10
70079 Portland Portland Glisan St Bridge Replacement Glisan St, NE (over abandoned railroad at 90th Ave) Replace existing poor-condition, weight-restricted bridge (#033) to ensure continued use by trucks, transit, and emergency response. $975,800 Yes Years 1 - 10
70080 ODOT ODOT Interstate 205 Southbound Auxiliary Lane I-205, NE/SE (I-84 - Stark/Washington) Extend existing auxiliary lane. $8,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70081 Portland Portland SE 21st Ave Bikeway 21st Ave, SE (Clinton - Gladstone) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
70083 Portland Portland Thorburn / Gilham Safety Improvements Thorburn St, SE (62nd - 74th); Gilham Ave, SE (Burnside - Thorburn) Design and implement a pedestrian walkway, improved crossings, and traffic calming elements. $3,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
70084 Portland Portland Belmont/Morrison Bikeway Belmont/Morrison St, SE (12th - 34th) Design and implement an east-west bikeway along the Belmont/Morrison corridor from 12th to 34th. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80001 Portland Portland Cherry Blossom/112th/111th Ped/Bike Improvements Cherry Blossom / 112th Ave / 111th Ave, SE (Washington - Mt Scott Blvd) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $2,070,127 Yes Years 1 - 10
80004 Portland Portland SE 136th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 136th Ave, SE (Division - Foster) Construct missing sidewalks on both sides of the street and add bicycle facilities. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80005 Portland Portland SE 148th Ave Pedestrian Improvements 148th Ave, SE (Division - Powell Butte Park) Construct sidewalks, curbs, and drainage improvements. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80009 Portland Portland Outer Division Corridor Improvements Division St, SE (I-205 - 174th) Construct streetscape improvements to enhance sidewalks, lighting, crossings, bus shelters and benches, and bicycle facilties. $5,710,912 Yes Years 1 - 10
80010 Portland Portland Outer Foster Rd Pedestrian Improvements Foster Rd, SE (102nd - Foster Pl) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements to facilitate pedestrian travel and access to transit. $1,403,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80012 Portland Portland Outer Holgate Ped/Bike Improvements Holgate Blvd, SE (92nd - 136th) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements to facilitate pedestrian travel and access to transit. Extend bicycle facilities from 130th to 136th. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80014 Portland Portland Mill Park Pedestrian Improvements Market St, SE (96th - 130th); Mill St, SE (130th - 148th); 101st Ave, SE (Market - Division); 117th Ave, SE (Stark - Division); 130th Ave, SE (Stark - Division) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements to enhance pedestrian travel and access to transit and schools. $10,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80015 ODOT/Portland ODOT Outer Powell Blvd Corridor Improvements, Phase 1 Powell Blvd, SE (116th - 136th) Widen street to three lanes (inclusive of a center turn lane) with sidewalks and buffered bike lanes or other enhanced bike facility. Add enhanced pedestrian and bike crossings. $24,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80016 Portland Portland Powellhurst/Gilbert Pedestrian Improvements Ramona St, SE (122nd - 136th); Harold St, SE (102nd-128th); Boise St, SE (116th - 127th); 103rd/104th Ave, SE (Powell-Foster); 130th Ave, SE (Powell - Holgate) Construct sidewalks, curbs, and drainage, as well as crossing improvements to enhance pedestrian travel and access to transit and schools. $10,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80017 Portland Portland Outer Stark Ped/Bike Improvements Stark, SE (108th - City Limits) Construct sidewalks and crossing improvements and provide bicycle facilities. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $8,209,130 Yes Years 1 - 10
80018 Portland Portland Gateway--Stark/Washington Streetscape Improvements Stark/Washington, SE (92nd - 111th) Implement Gateway regional center plan with boulevard design retrofit including new traffic signals, improved pedestrian facilities and crossings, and street lighting. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $6,157,767 Yes Years 1 - 10
80020 Portland Portland 4M Bikeway Market / Mill / Millmain / Main, SE (I-205 - 174th) Design and implement a bikeway, with improved crossings at major streets. $1,750,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80021 Portland Portland SE Clatsop St Corridor Improvements Clatsop, SE (Deardorf / 132nd - 162nd) Design and implement multimodal improvements based on Pleasant Valley Concept and Implementation Plan recommendations. $7,013,394 No
80023 Portland Portland 162nd & Clatsop Intersection Improvements 162nd & Clatsop, SE Install a signal at the intersection. $500,000 No
80024 Portland Multnomah Co / Clackamas Co Clatsop Street Extension Clatsop, SE (162nd - Cheldelin Rd) Extend street east into Pleasant Valley based on the Pleasant Valley Implementation Plan. $4,202,582 No
80025 Portland Portland Pleasant Valley Foster Rd Extension Foster Rd, SE (Jenne - Giese Rd) Design and implement multimodal improvements based on the Pleasant Valley Implementation Plan recommendations. $2,525,400 No
80026 Portland Portland SE 162nd Ave Corridor Improvements 162nd, SE (Foster Rd - Clatsop) Construct multimodal improvements based on the Pleasant Valley Concept and Implementation Plan recommendations. $6,421,100 No
80028 Portland Portland SE/NE 135th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 135th Ave, SE/NE (Division - Pacific) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $914,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80029 Portland Portland SE/NE 146th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 146th Ave, SE/NE (Powell - Glisan) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $562,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80030 Portland Portland Outer Harold Bikeway Harold St, SE (104th - 136th) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,566,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80031 Portland Portland SE/NE 117th Ave Neighborhood Greenway 117th Ave, SE/NE (Springwater Trail - I-84) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $1,289,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80032 ODOT/Portland ODOT Outer Powell Blvd Corridor Improvements, Phase 2 Powell Blvd, SE (99th - 116th; 136th - 174th) Widen street to three lanes (inclusive of a center turn lane), or four lanes from 162nd – 174th if specific traffic conditions are met, with sidewalks and buffered bike lanes or other enhanced bike facility. Add enhanced pedestrian and bike crossings. $67,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
80033 Portland TriMet Eastside MAX Station Pedestrian Improvements 82nd Ave, 148th Ave, & 162nd Ave MAX Stations, NE/SE Retrofit existing streets along eastside MAX and at intersecting streets to include better sidewalks and crossings, curb extensions, bus shelters, and benches at 82nd, 148th, and 162nd stations. $3,156,750 Yes Years 11 - 20
80034 Portland Portland East Portland Access to Transit Division St, SE (I-205 - 174th); 130s Aves (San Rafael - Foster) Construct SE Division St sidewalk infill and 130s Bikeway. $4,472,488 Yes Years 1 - 10
80035 Portland Portland East Portland Access to Employment East Portland This project will build sidewalks and crossing improvements on Powell Blvd, improve sidewalks for access to transit, improve transit stops, improve transit operations, and build the 100s and 150s Neighborhood Greenways. $5,870,072 Yes Years 1 - 10
80036 TriMet TriMet Renew the Blue Station Rehabilitation Eastside MAX Light Rail Stations, NE/SE Construct station improvements at Eastside MAX Stations. $12,315,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80037 TriMet Portland/ODOT Powell-Division Safety and Access to Transit Powell-Division Corridor, SE (22nd - City Limits) Construct improvements for safety, access to transit, and transit operations in the Powell-Division corridor. $2,800,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80038 Gresham Portland/Multnomah Co. SE 174th N/S Improvements 174th Ave, SE (Giese - 174th/Jenne) Construction of new roadway that adds n/s capacity in vicinity of 174/Jenne. This facility will have two travel lanes in each direction (total 4 travel lanes), and a median/turn lane which will be primarily a median, with left turn pockets at the intersection of the New Road/Giese, and also New Road/McKinley. $27,498,638 Yes Years 11 - 20
80039 TriMet Portland Powell/Division HCT--Project Development Powell/Division Corridor (Portland to Gresham) Project Development through ROW acquisition/early construction for High Capacity Transit project between Portland and Gresham. $75,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80040 TriMet Portland/ODOT Powell-Division Corridor HCT--Capital Construction Central City Portland to Gresham Capital construction of High Capacity Transit project between Portland and Gresham along Powell/Division Corridor. $75,000,000 No
80041 ODOT ODOT Interstate 205 Northbound Phase 1 Auxiliary Lane I-205, NE/SE (Powell - Stark/Washington) Extend existing acceleration lane to Washington and construct 2 lane exit. $7,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
80042 ODOT ODOT I-205 Northbound Phase 2: Auxiliary Lane Extension I-205, NE/SE (Division - I-84) Extend existing auxiliary lane. $8,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90001 Portland Portland Montgomery to Vista Bikeway 12th/Broadway/Cardinell/Davenport, SW (Montgomery - Vista) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $4,135,188 No
90002 Portland Portland SW 19th / Capitol Hill Rd Safety Improvements 19th, SW (Barbur - Spring Garden); Capitol Hill Rd, SW (Barbur - Bertha) Design and implement bicycle and pedestrian facilities to create a safe and convenient crossing of I-5, Multnomah Blvd, and Barbur Blvd. Design and implement enhanced shared roadway bicycle facilities on Capitol Hill Rd from Barbur to Bertha. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90003 Portland Portland SW 25th/Kanan Pedestrian Improvements 25th/Kanan, SW (23rd - Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy) Construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $1,597,369 No
90004 Portland Portland 26th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 26th Ave, SW (30th - Taylors Ferry) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90005 Portland Portland SW 30th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 30th Ave, SW (Vermont - Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities, and improve the pedestrian crossing at Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy & 30th. $1,839,333 Yes Years 11 - 20
90006 Portland Portland Inner SW 35th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 35th Ave, SW (Vermont - Multnomah) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $2,500,000 No
90007 Portland Portland Outer SW 35th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 35th Ave, SW (Taylors Ferry - Stephenson); Taylors Ferry, SW (35th - 26th) Add bicycle facilities, sidewalks, crossing improvements, and median islands. $2,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90008.1 Portland Portland SW 45th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 45th Ave, SW (Cameron - Illinois) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $1,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90008.2 Portland Portland SW 45th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 45th Ave, SW (Illinois - Nevada) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90008.3 Portland Portland SW 45th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 3 45th Ave, SW (Nevada - Multnomah) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $1,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90008.4 Portland Portland SW 45th/48th Ave Ped/Bike Improvements 45th Ave / 45th Dr / 48th Ave, SW (Multnomah - Taylors Ferry) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $4,000,000 No
90011 Portland Portland SW Pomona/64th Ped/Bike Improvements Pomona/63rd/64th, SW (61st - Barbur) Construct sidewalks and bicycle facilities. $2,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90012 Portland Portland SW 62nd/61st Ped/Bike Improvements 62nd/61st, SW (Taylors Ferry - Pomona) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $3,250,000 No
90013 Portland Portland SW Arnold Ped/Bike Improvements Arnold, SW (Boones Ferry - 35th) Design and implement bicycle and pedestrian facilities. $3,191,287 No
90014 Portland ODOT Barbur Blvd ITS Barbur Blvd, SW Install intelligent transportation system infrastructure to improve safety and enhance traffic flow. $550,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90016 Portland ODOT Inner Barbur Corridor Improvements Barbur Blvd, SW (3rd - Terwilliger) Construct Improvements for transit, bikes and pedestrians. Transit improvements include preferential signals, pullouts, shelters, left turn lanes and sidewalks. $4,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90017 Portland ODOT Outer Barbur Corridor Improvements Barbur Blvd, SW (Terwilliger - City Limits) Complete boulevard design improvements including sidewalks and street trees, safe pedestrian crossings, enhance transit access and stop locations, traffic signal at Barbur/30th, and bike lanes (Bertha - City Limits). $24,833,100 Yes Years 11 - 20
90018 TriMet ODOT Barbur/OR-99W Safety and Access to Transit Barbur Blvd, SW (Hooker - 53rd) Construct improvements for safety, access to transit, and transit operations in the Barbur corridor. $3,605,001 Yes Years 1 - 10
90019 Portland Portland Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy ITS Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy, SW Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $315,675 Yes Years 1 - 10
90020 Portland Portland Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy Corridor Improvements Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy, SW (Capitol Hwy - 65th) Build new sidewalks, improve crossings, and enhance access to transit. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $3,565,023 Yes Years 1 - 10
90023 Portland Portland Boones Ferry Rd Bikeway Boones Ferry Rd, SW (Terwilliger - City Limits) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $7,015,000 No
90024 Portland Portland SW Broadway Dr Pedestrian Improvements Broadway Dr, SW (Sherwood - Grant) Construct a walkway and crossing improvements. $4,676,654 No
90025 Portland Portland SW Cameron Rd Pedestrian Improvements Cameron Rd, SW (45th - Shattuck) Construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $2,500,000 No
90026 Portland Portland Capitol Hwy Corridor Improvements Capitol Hwy, SW (Multnomah Blvd - Taylors Ferry) Improve SW Capitol Highway from SW Multnomah Boulevard to SW Taylors Ferry Road to include a continuous sidewalk(s), safe crossings and bicycle access along the corridor. $12,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90027 Portland Portland Outer Capitol Hwy Corridor Improvements Capitol Hwy, SW (West Portland Town Center - 49th) Construct curb extensions, medians, improved crossings, and other pedestrian improvements. Make safety improvements including left turn pockets and improved signal timing. $1,553,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90028 Portland Portland B-H Hwy/Bertha/Capitol Hwy Improvements Beaverton-Hillsdale /Bertha/Capitol Hwy, SW Redesign intersection to improve safety. $1,403,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90029 Portland Portland Inner Capitol Hwy Corridor Improvements Capitol Hwy, SW (Terwilliger - Sunset) Construct sidewalks, crossing improvements for access to transit, and bike improvements, and install left turn lane at the Capitol/Burlingame intersection. $2,806,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90031.1 Portland Portland SW Dosch Rd Interim Safety Improvements Dosch Rd, SW (B-H Hwy - Patton) Construct an enhanced shoulder to improve safety for all modes. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90031.2 Portland Portland SW Dosch Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 Dosch Rd, SW (B-H Hwy - Hamilton) Construct a pedestrian walkway and climbing bike lane. $3,000,000 No
90031.3 Portland Portland SW Dosch Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 Dosch Rd, SW (Hamilton - Patton) Construct a pedestrian walkway and climbing bike lane. $3,500,000 No
90033 Portland Portland Garden Home Ped/Bike Improvements Garden Home Rd, SW (Multnomah - Capitol Hwy) Construct pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, including drainage designed for constrained right-of-way. $1,795,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90034.1 Portland Portland Bridlemile Ped/Bike Improvements, Phase 1 Hamilton St, SW (Scholls Ferry - 53rd; 48th - 45th); Shattuck Rd, SW (B-H Hwy - 53rd) Construct a pedestrian walkway, bicycle facilities, and crossing improvements. $3,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90034.2 Portland Portland Bridlemile Ped/Bike Improvements, Phase 2 Hamilton St, SW (53rd - 48th; 45th - Dosch); Shattuck Rd, SW (53rd - Hamilton) Construct a pedestrian walkway, bicycle facilities, and crossing improvements. $4,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90034.3 Portland Portland Bridlemile Ped/Bike Improvements, Phase 3 Shattuck Rd, SW (Hamilton - Patton) Construct a pedestrian walkway, bicycle facilities, and crossing improvements. $2,500,000 No
90038 Portland Portland SW Humphrey Blvd Ped/Bike Improvements Humphrey Blvd, SW (Patton - Scholls Ferry) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $4,000,000 No
90043 Portland Portland SW Lancaster Rd Ped/Bike Improvements Lancaster Rd, SW (Taylors Ferry - Stephenson) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $10,000,000 No
90046 Portland ODOT Macadam ITS Macadam, SW (Bancroft - Sellwood Br) Install needed ITS infrastructure (communication network, new traffic controllers, CCTV cameras, and vehicle /pedestrian detectors). These ITS devices allow us to provide more efficient and safe operation of our traffic signal system. $401,794 Yes Years 11 - 20
90047 Portland ODOT SW Macadam Ped/Bike Improvements Macadam, SW (Bancroft - County line) Improve pedestrian and bicycle crossings of Macadam and connections to the Willamette Greenway Trail. Project design will consider freight movement needs, consistent with policies, street classification(s) and uses. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90048 Portland Portland Markham School Pedestrian/Bicycle Overpass SW 52nd - Markham School (bridge over I-5 and Barbur Blvd) Construct pedestrian/bicycle path and bridge over Barbur Blvd and I-5 to connect SW Alfred and SW 52nd to the rear of Markham School. $4,861,395 Yes Years 11 - 20
90049.1 Portland Portland Marquam Hill Rd Interim Safety Improvements Marquam Hill Rd, SW (Gibbs - Fairmount) Construct an enhanced shoulder to improve safety for all modes. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90049.2 Portland Portland Marquam Hill Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 Gibbs St, SW (13th - 11th) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90049.3 Portland Portland Marquam Hill Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 Marquam Hill Rd, SW (Gibbs - Fairmount) Construct a pedestrian walkway and climbing bike lane. $2,000,000 No
90050 Portland Portland SW Multnomah Blvd Ped/Bike Improvements, Phase 2 Multnomah Blvd, SW (31st - 45th) Provide separated pedestrian and bicycle facilities, along with stormwater management facilities. $5,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90052 Portland Portland SW Palatine Hill / Primrose Bikeway Palatine Hill Rd, SW (Boones Ferry - Palater); Primrose St, SW (Terwilliger - Boones Ferry) Design and implement a bikeway from Terwilliger to Palater, including improved crossings at Primrose & Terwilliger and Primrose & Boones Ferry. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90053 Portland Portland SW Palatine Street Extension Palatine St, SW (27th-Lancaster) Complete neighborhood collector to provide multimodal access to Lancaster Rd. $2,120,098 No
90054.1 Portland Portland SW Patton Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 Patton Rd, SW (Vista - Talbot) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $2,500,000 No
90054.2 Portland Portland SW Patton Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 Patton Rd, SW (Hewett - Shattuck) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $3,000,000 No
90054.3 Portland Portland SW Patton / Talbot Ped/Bike Improvements Patton Rd, SW (Talbot - Hewett); Talbot Rd, SW (Patton - Fairmount) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities, with improved crossings where needed. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90055 Portland Portland SW Pomona St Ped/Bike Improvements Pomona St, SW (35th - Barbur) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $2,476,710 No
90059.1 Portland Portland SW Shattuck Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 Shattuck Rd, SW (B-H Hwy - Cameron) Construct a pedestrian walkway, climbing bike lane, and crossing improvements. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90059.2 Portland Portland SW Shattuck Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 Shattuck Rd, SW (Cameron - Illinois) Construct a pedestrian walkway, climbing bike lane, and crossing improvements. $1,500,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90059.3 Portland Portland SW Shattuck Rd Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 3 Shattuck Rd, SW (Illinois - Vermont) Construct a pedestrian walkway, climbing bike lane, and crossing improvements. $1,000,000 No
90060 Portland ODOT South Portland Corridor Improvements Naito Pkwy, SW (Arthur - Barbur) Reconstruct Naito Pkwy as a two-lane road with bicycle facilities, sidewalks, left turn pockets, and on-street parking. Includes realignment/regrading at intersecting streets; removal of Barbur tunnel, Ross Island Br ramps, Arthur/Kelly viaduct, and Grover pedestrian bridge. This project will be coordinated with ODOT and with the Southwest Corridor Plan, and will consider impacts to ODOT facilities including Naito Parkway and the Ross Island Bridge. $39,695,079 Yes Years 11 - 20
90061 Portland Portland SW Spring Garden St Ped/Bike Improvements Spring Garden/22nd, SW (Taylors Ferry - Multnomah) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities, including improved crossings at 22nd & Barbur and 22nd & Multnomah. $2,500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90062 Portland Portland SW Stephenson Ped/Bike Improvements Stephenson, SW (Boones Ferry - 35th) Construct pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $2,374,408 Yes Years 11 - 20
90063 Portland Portland Sunset Blvd Ped/Bike Improvements Sunset Blvd, SW (Dosch - 18th) Construct a pedestrian walkway and climbing bike lane. $2,300,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90064.1 Portland Portland Outer Taylors Ferry Safety Improvements, Segment 1 Taylors Ferry, SW (Capitol Hwy - 48th) Widen shoulder to provide bicycle climbing lane and construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $2,175,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90064.2 Portland Portland Outer Taylors Ferry Safety Improvements, Segment 2 Taylors Ferry, SW (48th - City Limits) Widen shoulder to provide bicycle climbing lane and construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $3,452,184 No
90065.1 Portland Portland Inner Taylors Ferry Safety Improvements, Segment 1 Taylors Ferry, SW (Macadam - Terwilliger) Widen shoulder to provide bicycle climbing lane and construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $3,530,642 No
90065.2 Portland Portland Inner Taylors Ferry Safety Improvements, Segment 2 Taylors Ferry, SW (Terwilliger - Spring Garden) Widen shoulder to provide bicycle climbing lane and construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $1,883,009 Yes Years 1 - 10
90065.3 Portland Portland Inner Taylors Ferry Safety Improvements, Segment 3 Taylors Ferry, SW (Spring Garden - 26th) Widen shoulder to provide bicycle climbing lane and construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and access to transit. $4,500,000 No
90066.1 Portland Portland SW Terwilliger Corridor Improvements, Segment 1 Terwilliger, SW (Taylors Ferry - Palater) Construct sidewalks and bicycle facilities. Redesign intersection of Terwilliger & Boones Ferry to improve safety for all modes. $4,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90066.2 Portland Portland / Multnomah Co. SW Terwilliger Corridor Improvements, Segment 2 Terwilliger, SW (Palater - County Limits) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $5,000,000 No
90067.1 Portland Portland SW Vermont St Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 1 Vermont St, SW (30th - 36th) Construct multi-modal street improvements including bicycle and pedestrian facilities. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90067.2 Portland Portland SW Vermont St Ped/Bike Improvements, Segment 2 Vermont St, SW (45th - 52nd) Construct multi-modal street improvements including bicycle and pedestrian facilities. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90068 Portland Portland / ODOT West Portland Town Center Pedestrian Improvements West Portland Town Center, SW Improve sidewalks, lighting, crossings, bus shelters, and benches on Barbur, Capitol Hwy, and surrounding neighborhood streets. $7,015,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90069 Portland ODOT West Portland Crossroads Intersection Improvements Barbur / Capitol / Huber / Taylors Ferry, SW Construct safety improvements for all modes at the intersections of Capitol Hwy, Taylors Ferry, Huber, and Barbur, including possible modifications to the I-5 ramps. This project will be coordinated with ODOT because it is within the interchange influence area. $40,000,000 No
90070 Portland Portland Capitol/Vermont/30th Intersection Improvements Capitol Hwy, SW (Vermont - 30th) Realign the Capitol/Vermont/30th intersection and provide sidewalks, bike lanes, and drainage improvements. $1,898,314 Yes Years 1 - 10
90071 Lake Oswego Various Lake Oswego to Portland Trail Willamette River Greenway Trail, SW (Sellwood Bridge - Lake Oswego) 3.15 mile multi-use pathway adjacent to existing Hwy 43 Corridor, increasing ROW. Connects Lake Oswego to Portland at Sellwood Bridge. Part of the Willamette River Greenway Trail. $80,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90072 Portland Portland Lesser Road Ped/Bike Improvements Lesser Rd / Capitol Hwy, SW (49th - Kruse Ridge) Design and implement pedestrian and bicycle facilities. $6,792,853 No
90073 Portland Portland SW Dolph Ct Ped/Bike Improvements Dolph Ct, SW (26th - Capitol Hwy) Construct a walkway for pedestrian travel and install a neighborhood greenway. $2,746,055 No
90077 Portland Portland Capitol Hwy Bridge Seismic Retrofit Capitol Hwy, SW (over Barbur and along hillside) Retrofit existing seismically vulnerable bridge over Barbur (#139) and semi-viaduct along hillside (#140) to ensure emergency response and economic recovery in the event of an earthquake. $3,705,915 Yes Years 11 - 20
90078 Multnomah County Portland Scholls Ferry Multimodal Improvements Scholls Ferry, SW (Humphrey - County line) Add bicycle and pedestrian facilities and make intersection improvements at Patton Road consistent with the Scholls Ferry Road Conceptual Design Plan. $3,226,900 No
90086 Portland Portland Slavin Rd Bikeway Slavin Rd, SW (Barbur - Corbett) Build a bikeway on Slavin Road connecting Barbur to Corbett, and construct an improved pedestrian/bicycle crossing of Barbur at the Capitol Hwy on-ramp. $2,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90087 Portland Portland Hood Ave Pedestrian Improvements Hood Ave, SW (Lane - Macadam) Install sidewalk with barrier along east side and pedestrian crossing at Lane Street. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90088 Portland Portland Marquam Hill Pedestrian Connector Gibbs Street right-of-way, SW (Barbur - Terwilliger) Construct a new pedestrian walkway under the tram within the Gibbs right-of-way through the Terwilliger Parkway. The steep grade and forested area will require lighting and stairs. $3,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90089 Portland ODOT Multnomah Viaduct Safety Improvements Multnomah Blvd, SW (I-5 Crossing) Construct new bicycle and pedestrian facilities at or parallel to Multnomah Blvd viaduct crossing I-5. $1,664,243 No
90090 Portland Portland Barbur to PCC Neighborhood Greenway 53rd Ave, SW (Barbur - PCC) Design and implement a neighborhood greenway connection between Barbur Blvd and PCC. Improve intersection at 53rd and Pomona to increase safety. $850,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90091 Portland Portland Terwilliger Bikeway Gaps Terwilliger, SW Design and implement bicycle facilities to fill in gaps in the Terwilliger Bikeway. $1,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90092 Portland Portland Inner Canby Neighborhood Greenway Canby St, SW (45th - 35th) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $516,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90093 Portland Portland Nevada Ct Neighborhood Greenway Nevada Ct, SW (45th - Capitol Hill Rd) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $653,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90094 Portland Portland Fairmount Blvd Bikeway Fairmount Blvd, SW (loop from Talbot Rd to Talbot Rd) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $845,000 No
90095.1 Portland Portland Montgomery Bikeway, Phase 1 Montgomery St/Dr, SW (Vista - 16th) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $300,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90095.2 Portland Portland Montgomery Bikeway, Phase 2 Montgomery St/Dr, SW (Patton - Vista) Design and implement bicycle facilities. $782,000 No
90096 Portland ODOT US 26 Multi-use Path US 26 (Canyon Ct - Canyon Rd / Murray St) Design and implement a multi-use path. $1,596,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90097 Portland ODOT Lower I-405 Trail I-405 (6th - Montgomery) Design and implement a multi-use path. $1,000,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90098 Portland Portland Capitol Hwy / Bertha Blvd Bridge Replacement Capitol Hwy, SW (bridge over Bertha Blvd) Replace existing weight-restricted bridge over Bertha Blvd (#081) with a new structure with improved vertical clearance. $5,326,682 No
90099 Portland Portland Capitol Hwy / Multnomah Blvd Bridge Replacement Capitol Hwy, SW (bridge over Multnomah Blvd) Replace existing weight-restricted bridge over Multnomah Blvd (#082) with a new structure. $7,156,281 No
90100 Portland Portland SW 30th/Hume/31st Ped/Bike Improvements 30th Ave, SW (Dolph - Hume); Hume St, SW (30th - 31st); 31st Ave, SW (Hume - Troy) Construct a pedestrian walkway and bicycle facilities. $2,800,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90101 Portland Portland Garden Home & Multnomah Intersection Improvements Garden Home Rd & Multnomah Blvd, SW Improve and signalize the intersection of Garden Home & Multnomah. $1,931,033 Yes Years 1 - 10
90102 Portland Portland / ODOT Johns Landing Streetcar Extension Lowell - Willamette Park, SW Corridor Alternatives Analysis, public outreach, planning, design, engineering, and construction for future streetcar extension from Portland to Johns Landing. $80,000,000 No
90104 Portland ODOT Barbur Active Transportation Demonstration Project Barbur Blvd, SW (19th - 26th) Make minor improvements to existing signalized intersections and provide two new enhanced crossings for pedestrians and cyclists along SW Barbur Blvd. $1,999,413 Yes Years 1 - 10
90105 TriMet Portland SW Corridor HCT--Project Development Southwest Corridor (Portland to Tualatin/Tigard) Project Development through ROW acquisition/early construction for High Capacity Transit project between Portland and Tualatin via Tigard. $75,000,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90106 TriMet Portland/ODOT Southwest Corridor HCT--Capital Construction Central City Portland to Tualatin/Tigard Capital construction of High Capacity Transit project between Portland and Tualatin via Tigard. $1,000,000,000 No
90107 ODOT ODOT Barbur Viaducts Reconstruction Barbur Blvd, SW (Vermont and Newbury Viaducts) Reconstruct existing viaducts to address seismic needs and include bicycle and pedestrian facilities on or parallel to the structures. $32,000,000 No
90108 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 1 Red Electric Trail, SW (Dover - Cameron) Construct Segment 1 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $1,565,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90109 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 2 Red Electric Trail, SW (Cameron - 39th) Construct Segment 2 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $3,425,700 Yes Years 11 - 20
90110 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 3 Red Electric Trail, SW (39th - 30th) Construct Segment 3 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $2,348,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90111 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 4 Red Electric Trail, SW (30th - 21st) Construct Segment 4 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $3,207,000 Yes Years 1 - 10
90112 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 5 Red Electric Trail, SW (21st - Terwilliger) Construct Segment 5 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $2,369,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90113 Portland Portland Red Electric Trail, Segment 6 Red Electric Trail, SW (Terwilliger - Willamette Park) Construct Segment 6 of the Red Electric Trail as recommended in the Red Electric Trail Planning Study. $4,739,000 Yes Years 11 - 20
90114 Portland Portland SW Hewett Blvd Bikeway Hewett Blvd, SW (Patton - Scholls Ferry) Design and implement enhanced shared roadway bicycle facilities. $500,000 Yes Years 1 - 10

Published by Portland Bureau of Transportation 2017